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New article - Jebel Moya: largest pastoral cemetery in sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Mikey Brass
    Dear all, Jean-Luc Schwenniger and I have co-authored a paper released online in Azania which argues for a revised chronology of the largest pastoral mortuary
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 29, 2013
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      Dear all,

      Jean-Luc Schwenniger and I have co-authored a paper released online in
      Azania which argues for a revised chronology of the largest pastoral
      mortuary complex in sub-Saharan Africa. Jebel Moya (Sudan) was
      originally excavated by the founder of the Wellcome Trust which both
      sponsored the dating and also more broadly sponsors my doctoral
      research on the site.

      The url for our Open Access paper is:
      http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0067270X.2013.843258

      The paper will be out in the December issue. The abstract follows below.

      Regards,
      Mike
      Ph.D. candidate in Archaeology
      Institute of Archaeology
      University College London


      Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern
      Meroitic frontier.
      Michael Brass (a) and Jean-Luc Schwenniger (b)
      (a) Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon
      Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom; (b) Research Laboratory for
      Archaeology and the History of Art, University of Oxford, South Parks
      Road, Oxford, OX1 3QY, United Kingdom

      This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel
      Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir
      Henry Wellcome’s original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the
      site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an
      attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and
      (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of
      this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial
      complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state,
      and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference
      point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is
      outlined.
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