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] Re: squeezes of inscriptions

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  • Trudy Kawami
    It is mulberry paper, made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree. It is (was?) easily accessible in fine arts supply houses less than ten years ago. The
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 27, 2013
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      It is mulberry paper, made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree. It is (was?) easily accessible in fine arts supply houses less than ten years ago. The leaves are not part of it, so don't query by mulberry-leaf. Fine arts conservation suppliers should also have it.

      Trudy S. Kawami

      -----Original Message-----
      From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael F. Lane
      Sent: Monday, August 26, 2013 9:13 AM
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [ANE-2] Re: squeezes of inscriptions

      Dear Jimmy, Joe, and Trudy,

      Thanks for the interesting and useful information!

      I think I may forgo photogrammetry for the time being because the budget is too tight to permit rational allocation to such for recording the inscription, and furthermore, the inscription is rather awkwardly located (up a cliff, as I said, across a raised irrigation channel, and facing south into the sun).

      I am especially intrigued by the mulberry-leaf paper option, and I am now trying to source it in the U.S. and Greece.

      All best wishes,

      Michael F. Lane
      University of Maryland Baltimore County

      --
      Prof. Michael Franklin Lane
      Co-Director, AROURA
      Ancient Studies Department
      University of Maryland, Baltimore County Fine Arts Building, Room 452
      1000 Hilltop Circle
      Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
      Tel. +1-410-455-2979 / Fax +1-410-455-1660
      Skype: barrenador
      http://www.umbc.edu/aroura





      ------------------------------------

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    • Michael F. Lane
      Ah, thanks for the correction. Looking around the web, I think I ve seen it before, even if I didn t know its origin. Is it a species of Japanese washi? I ask,
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 27, 2013
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        Ah, thanks for the correction. Looking around the web, I think I've seen
        it before, even if I didn't know its origin. Is it a species of Japanese
        washi? I ask, because as far as I can tell, it is normally referred to as
        Ιαπωνικό χαρτί in modern Greek, and, as it happens, the biggest supplier
        for archives in Greece is out of it (http://www.insituconservation.com). I
        suppose I'll have to try to find a source stateside.

        Cheers!

        Michael F. Lane
        Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County

        > It is mulberry paper, made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree. It
        > is (was?) easily accessible in fine arts supply houses less than ten years
        > ago. The leaves are not part of it, so don't query by mulberry-leaf. Fine
        > arts conservation suppliers should also have it.
        >
        > Trudy S. Kawami
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        > Michael F. Lane
        > Sent: Monday, August 26, 2013 9:13 AM
        > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [ANE-2] Re: squeezes of inscriptions
        >
        > Dear Jimmy, Joe, and Trudy,
        >
        > Thanks for the interesting and useful information!
        >
        > I think I may forgo photogrammetry for the time being because the budget
        > is too tight to permit rational allocation to such for recording the
        > inscription, and furthermore, the inscription is rather awkwardly located
        > (up a cliff, as I said, across a raised irrigation channel, and facing
        > south into the sun).
        >
        > I am especially intrigued by the mulberry-leaf paper option, and I am now
        > trying to source it in the U.S. and Greece.
        >
        > All best wishes,
        >
        > Michael F. Lane
        > University of Maryland Baltimore County
        >
        > --
        > Prof. Michael Franklin Lane
        > Co-Director, AROURA
        > Ancient Studies Department
        > University of Maryland, Baltimore County Fine Arts Building, Room 452
        > 1000 Hilltop Circle
        > Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
        > Tel. +1-410-455-2979 / Fax +1-410-455-1660
        > Skype: barrenador
        > http://www.umbc.edu/aroura
      • Joe Zias
        If it s vertical, high up, you may need to use silicone to make a cast of the insc. which we did and then make a polyester cast and then the squeeze. Silicone
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 27, 2013
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          If it's vertical, high up, you may need to use silicone to make a cast of the insc. which we did and then make a polyester cast and then the 'squeeze. Silicone is expensive.


           
          Joe Zias www.joezias.org

          Anthropology/Paleopathology/Guide

          Science and Antiquity - Jerusalem
          Jerusalem, Israel



          >________________________________
          > From: Michael F. Lane <mflane@...>
          >To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
          >Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 2:15 AM
          >Subject: Re: [ANE-2] ] Re: squeezes of inscriptions
          >
          >
          >Ah, thanks for the correction. Looking around the web, I think I've seen
          >it before, even if I didn't know its origin. Is it a species of Japanese
          >washi? I ask, because as far as I can tell, it is normally referred to as
          >Ιαπωνικό χαρτί in modern Greek, and, as it happens, the biggest supplier
          >for archives in Greece is out of it (http://www.insituconservation.com). I
          >suppose I'll have to try to find a source stateside.
          >
          >Cheers!
          >
          >Michael F. Lane
          >Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County
          >
          >> It is mulberry paper,  made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree. It
          >> is (was?) easily accessible in fine arts supply houses less than ten years
          >> ago. The leaves are not part of it, so don't query by mulberry-leaf. Fine
          >> arts conservation suppliers should also have it.
          >>
          >> Trudy S. Kawami
          >>
          >> -----Original Message-----
          >> From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          >> Michael F. Lane
          >> Sent: Monday, August 26, 2013 9:13 AM
          >> To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
          >> Subject: [ANE-2] Re: squeezes of inscriptions
          >>
          >> Dear Jimmy, Joe, and Trudy,
          >>
          >> Thanks for the interesting and useful information!
          >>
          >> I think I may forgo photogrammetry for the time being because the budget
          >> is too tight to permit rational allocation to such for recording the
          >> inscription, and furthermore, the inscription is rather awkwardly located
          >> (up a cliff, as I said, across a raised irrigation channel, and facing
          >> south into the sun).
          >>
          >> I am especially intrigued by the mulberry-leaf paper option, and I am now
          >> trying to source it in the U.S. and Greece.
          >>
          >> All best wishes,
          >>
          >> Michael F. Lane
          >> University of Maryland Baltimore County
          >>
          >> --
          >> Prof. Michael Franklin Lane
          >> Co-Director, AROURA
          >> Ancient Studies Department
          >> University of Maryland, Baltimore County Fine Arts Building, Room 452
          >> 1000 Hilltop Circle
          >> Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
          >> Tel. +1-410-455-2979 / Fax +1-410-455-1660
          >> Skype: barrenador
          >> http://www.umbc.edu/aroura
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

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