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Archaeology sale at www.eisenbrauns.com

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  • jimeisenbraun
    With apologies for cross-posting: April sale: Megiddo and More! Forthcoming, new, and old archaeological volumes 20%-50% off! Eisenbrauns has three
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 18, 2013
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      With apologies for cross-posting:

      April sale: Megiddo and More! Forthcoming, new, and old archaeological volumes 20%-50% off!
      Eisenbrauns has three much-anticipated archaeological volumes in the final stages of production and set to go to press within a couple of months: Sepphoris I, Gezer VII, and the three-volume Megiddo V (published by Eisenbrauns for Tel Aviv University Institute of Archaeology). We cannot contain our delight at this imminent outpouring of archaeology, so we are preselling them at significant discounts. We are offering 30% off the Sepphoris and Gezer volumes, and the Megiddo set, whose list price is $289.85, is available for $200. All of these prices are available for April only. Preorder them now!

      As if this archaeological extravagance weren't enough, we are offering big discounts on a variety of other archaeological volumes during this month. We have several other volumes relating to Gezer and Sepphoris, as well as other classic reports (such as Tell el-Hesi and Bab edh-Dhra) and more recent works (Lahav I-II, Dothan I, Qatna I-II, etc.). Don't miss this exciting sale!

      *As a reminder, with preordered items we will not charge your credit card until we ship the book.

      To see all of the titles and the complete sale listing, follow this link:

      http://www.eisenbrauns.com/pages/SPECIAL

      Jim Eisenbraun
      Eisenbrauns, www.eisenbrauns.com, Winona Lake, Indiana
    • Michael F. Lane
      Dear all, I am hoping some of you can direct me to a comprehensive discussion of Cushitic loanwords in Semitic languages, presuming such exist. (I understand
      Message 2 of 4 , May 9 2:27 PM
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        Dear all,

        I am hoping some of you can direct me to a comprehensive discussion of
        Cushitic loanwords in Semitic languages, presuming such exist. (I
        understand that the reverse is true.) I am particularly interested in
        Cushitic loanwords in the Central Semitic subfamily -- which, I will be
        quick to admit, may be too much to hope for.

        All very best,

        Michael F. Lane
        University of Maryland Baltimore County

        --
        Dr. Michael Franklin Lane
        Co-Director, AROURA
        Ancient Studies Department
        University of Maryland, Baltimore County
        Fine Arts Building, Room 452
        1000 Hilltop Circle
        Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
        Tel. +1-410-455-2979 / Fax +1-410-455-1660
        Skype: barrenador
        http://www.umbc.edu/aroura
      • Peter T. Daniels
        I know of three recent sketches of Cushitic in relation to Semitic, two by David Appleyard (SOAS), in the Weninger volume from De Gruyter Mouton (in the
        Message 3 of 4 , May 10 6:35 AM
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          I know of three recent sketches of Cushitic in relation to Semitic, two by David Appleyard (SOAS), in the Weninger volume from De Gruyter Mouton (in the Handbooks of Linguistics and Communication series, 2011) and in the Edzard volume from Harrassowitz (in the Porta Linguarum Orientalium, 2012) and one by Gene Gragg in Burkhart Kienast's Historische Semitische Sprachwissenschaft (2001). None of them so much as mentions shared vocabulary, either inherited or borrowed. Gragg, though, has been working on a Cushitic Etymological Dictionary for decades and may be able to provide some information. (I don't know what's in the new Cambridge Green volume on Afroasiatic by Frajzyngier; Gragg & Hoberman did the Semitic chapter there, and Maarten Mous the Cushitic chapter.)

          But probably you need to consult lexicographers of Arabic. (The late?) Garland Cannon produced a series of dictionaries of loanwords in Arabic, but he hasn't gotten (didn't get?) around to Cushitic. 
          --
          Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
          Jersey City

          >________________________________
          > From: Michael F. Lane <mflane@...>
          >To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
          >Sent: Thursday, May 9, 2013 5:27 PM
          >Subject: [ANE-2] Cushitic loanwords in Semitic languages?
          >
          >
          >
          >Dear all,
          >
          >I am hoping some of you can direct me to a comprehensive discussion of
          >Cushitic loanwords in Semitic languages, presuming such exist. (I
          >understand that the reverse is true.) I am particularly interested in
          >Cushitic loanwords in the Central Semitic subfamily -- which, I will be
          >quick to admit, may be too much to hope for.
          >
          >All very best,
          >
          >Michael F. Lane
          >University of Maryland Baltimore County
          >
          >--
          >Dr. Michael Franklin Lane
          >Co-Director, AROURA
          >Ancient Studies Department
          >University of Maryland, Baltimore County
          >Fine Arts Building, Room 452
          >1000 Hilltop Circle
          >Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
          >Tel. +1-410-455-2979 / Fax +1-410-455-1660
          >Skype: barrenador
          >http://www.umbc.edu/aroura
        • Michael F. Lane
          Dear Peter, These citations are very useful. I ll look into Gragg s work, and I ll definitely check out Cannon, as I have a working knowledge of Arabic. With
          Message 4 of 4 , May 12 11:35 AM
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            Dear Peter,

            These citations are very useful. I'll look into Gragg's work, and I'll
            definitely check out Cannon, as I have a working knowledge of Arabic.

            With thanks also to other who replied,

            Michael F. Lane
            University of Maryland Baltimore County

            > I know of three recent sketches of Cushitic in relation to Semitic, two by
            > David Appleyard (SOAS), in the Weninger volume from De Gruyter Mouton (in
            > the Handbooks of Linguistics and Communication series, 2011) and in the
            > Edzard volume from Harrassowitz (in the Porta Linguarum Orientalium, 2012)
            > and one by Gene Gragg in Burkhart Kienast's Historische Semitische
            > Sprachwissenschaft (2001). None of them so much as mentions shared
            > vocabulary, either inherited or borrowed. Gragg, though, has been working
            > on a Cushitic Etymological Dictionary for decades and may be able to
            > provide some information. (I don't know what's in the new Cambridge Green
            > volume on Afroasiatic by Frajzyngier; Gragg & Hoberman did the Semitic
            > chapter there, and Maarten Mous the Cushitic chapter.)
            >
            > But probably you need to consult lexicographers of Arabic. (The late?)
            > Garland Cannon produced a series of dictionaries of loanwords in Arabic,
            > but he hasn't gotten (didn't get?) around to Cushitic. 
            > --
            > Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
            > Jersey City
            >
            >>________________________________
            >> From: Michael F. Lane <mflane@...>
            >>To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
            >>Sent: Thursday, May 9, 2013 5:27 PM
            >>Subject: [ANE-2] Cushitic loanwords in Semitic languages?
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Dear all,
            >>
            >>I am hoping some of you can direct me to a comprehensive discussion of
            >>Cushitic loanwords in Semitic languages, presuming such exist. (I
            >>understand that the reverse is true.) I am particularly interested in
            >>Cushitic loanwords in the Central Semitic subfamily -- which, I will be
            >>quick to admit, may be too much to hope for.
            >>
            >>All very best,
            >>
            >>Michael F. Lane
            >>University of Maryland Baltimore County
            >>
            >>--
            >>Dr. Michael Franklin Lane
            >>Co-Director, AROURA
            >>Ancient Studies Department
            >>University of Maryland, Baltimore County
            >>Fine Arts Building, Room 452
            >>1000 Hilltop Circle
            >>Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
            >>Tel. +1-410-455-2979 / Fax +1-410-455-1660
            >>Skype: barrenador
            >>http://www.umbc.edu/aroura
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