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Re: [ANE-2] First mention of Mesopotamia

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  • Stewart Felker
    I think that s going to be Polybius, Histories 5.44.6.* * Stewart
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 27, 2013
      I think that's going to be Polybius, Histories
      5.44.6.*<http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:abo:tlg,0543,001:5:44:6&lang=original>
      *

      Stewart Felker
      University of Memphis


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Beatrice Hopkinson
      According to wikipedia it could be a little earlier: The oldest known occurrence of the name Mesopotamia comes from the Anabasis Alexandri, which was written
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 28, 2013
        According to wikipedia it could be a little earlier:

        The oldest known occurrence of the name Mesopotamia comes from the Anabasis Alexandri, which was written in the late second century AD but specifically refers to sources from the time of Alexander the Great. In the Anabasis, Mesopotamia was used to designate the land east of the Euphrates in north Syria. The Aramaic term biritum/birit narimcorresponded to a similar geographical concept.[1] Later, the term Mesopotamia was more generally applied to all the lands between the Euphrates and the Tigris, thereby incorporating not only parts of Syria but also almost all of Iraq and southeastern Turkey.[2] The neighbouring steppes to the west of the Euphrates and the western part of the Zagros Mountains are also often included under the wider term Mesopotamia.[3][4][5]


        Beatrice Hopkinson
        Hon. Secretary Oxford University Soc. LA Branch
        President, DBSAT (Droitwich Brine Springs and ArchaeologicalTrust)
        Board AIA (Archaeological Institute of America)
        Affiliate, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA


        On Mar 27, 2013, at 11:49 PM, Stewart Felker wrote:

        I think that's going to be Polybius, Histories
        5.44.6.*<http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:abo:tlg,0543,001:5:44:6&lang=original>
        *

        Stewart Felker
        University of Memphis

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • imbros03
        Dear Stewart and Beatrice, Thanks for the information. I am starting to appreciate wikipedia!!! :) Anyway, I thought that the oldest written mention of
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 3, 2013
          Dear Stewart and Beatrice,

          Thanks for the information.

          I am starting to appreciate wikipedia!!! :)

          Anyway, I thought that the oldest written mention of Mesopotamia was much older than Alexander's time.

          Wikipedia refers the article by Finkelstein ("Mesopotamia", JNES, Vol. XXI, No. 2, 1961) where it is mentioned "...certain geographical references in Old Babylonian contracts involving the sale of
          slaves which appear to represent the very Akkadian antecedent for the name "Mesotamia" and the Aramaic byn nhryn..."

          Thanks again and best regards,

          Aldo Tamburrino
          University of Chile


          --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Beatrice Hopkinson <beahopkinson@...> wrote:
          >
          > According to wikipedia it could be a little earlier:
          >
          > The oldest known occurrence of the name Mesopotamia comes from the Anabasis Alexandri, which was written in the late second century AD but specifically refers to sources from the time of Alexander the Great. In the Anabasis, Mesopotamia was used to designate the land east of the Euphrates in north Syria. The Aramaic term biritum/birit narimcorresponded to a similar geographical concept.[1] Later, the term Mesopotamia was more generally applied to all the lands between the Euphrates and the Tigris, thereby incorporating not only parts of Syria but also almost all of Iraq and southeastern Turkey.[2] The neighbouring steppes to the west of the Euphrates and the western part of the Zagros Mountains are also often included under the wider term Mesopotamia.[3][4][5]
          >
          >
          > Beatrice Hopkinson
          > Hon. Secretary Oxford University Soc. LA Branch
          > President, DBSAT (Droitwich Brine Springs and ArchaeologicalTrust)
          > Board AIA (Archaeological Institute of America)
          > Affiliate, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA
          >
          >
          > On Mar 27, 2013, at 11:49 PM, Stewart Felker wrote:
          >
          > I think that's going to be Polybius, Histories
          > 5.44.6.*<http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:abo:tlg,0543,001:5:44:6&lang=original>
          > *
          >
          > Stewart Felker
          > University of Memphis
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Jon Smyth
          In the Anabasis?, that is interesting. Several years ago I had cause to research into the first use of Mesopotamia. And I agree it was first used in the time
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 7, 2013
            In the Anabasis?, that is interesting.
            Several years ago I had cause to research into the first use of Mesopotamia. And I agree it was first used in the time of Alexander, but the source I uncovered suggested the "land between the two rivers", in its initial Greek? concept, referred to the land between the Orontes and the Euphrates.

            I've wondered if anyone on the list might be familiar with this.

            Jon Smyth
            Kitchener, ON.
          • Jon Smyth
            This is what I remember discovering, that Mesopotamia only means the same as the Akkadian Naharaim (Egyptian Naharyn), both mean essentially River Country .
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 13, 2013
              This is what I remember discovering, that Mesopotamia only means the same as the Akkadian Naharaim (Egyptian Naharyn), both mean essentially "River Country".

              The western border of Naharaim was the Orontes (Nii was in Naharyn and was located on the banks of the Orontes). The eastern border is debatable as Naharaim appears to be used by the Assyrians up to the region of Lake Van.

              The more modern application for the term Mesopotamia, between the Euphrates & the Tigris, is a rather narrow interpretation.

              Jon Smyth
              Kitchener, ON


              --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "imbros03" <atamburr@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Dear Stewart and Beatrice,
              >
              > Thanks for the information.
              >
              > I am starting to appreciate wikipedia!!! :)
              >
              > Anyway, I thought that the oldest written mention of Mesopotamia was much older than Alexander's time.
              >
              > Wikipedia refers the article by Finkelstein ("Mesopotamia", JNES, Vol. XXI, No. 2, 1961) where it is mentioned "...certain geographical references in Old Babylonian contracts involving the sale of
              > slaves which appear to represent the very Akkadian antecedent for the name "Mesotamia" and the Aramaic byn nhryn..."
              >
              > Thanks again and best regards,
              >
              > Aldo Tamburrino
              > University of Chile
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