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Re: [ANE-2] "his seed is not"

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  • Richard Seager
    Frank, The Bible and Herodotus are very similar. Easy mistake to make. Richard Seager Melbourne, Australia.
    Message 1 of 62 , Mar 2 7:24 AM
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      Frank,

      The Bible and Herodotus are very similar. Easy mistake to make.

      Richard Seager
      Melbourne, Australia.

      On 02/03/2013, at 4:11 PM, Frank Polak <frankha@...> wrote:

      > It was not. It was purely dependence on the Herodotean text, which has
      > to be quoted in context.
      >
      > Frank Polak
      > Tel Aviv University
      > On Mar 2, 2013, at 4:43 PM, Niels Peter Lemche wrote:
      >
      >> Agree, but what I "deconstructed" was a probably dependence on
      >> biblical information.
      >>
      >> Niels Peter Lemche
      >> Copenhagen
      >>
      >> -----Oprindelig meddelelse-----
      >> Fra: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] På vegne
      >> af Jean-Fabrice Nardelli
      >> Sendt: den 2 mars 2013 12:46
      >> Til: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      >> Emne: SV: SV: [ANE-2] Re: "his seed is not"
      >>
      >> 'Deconstruction', Niels, does not mean 'freely postulating an animus
      >> in the work of distinguished experts'. Would you refuse to learn
      >> from Salomon Reinach because he was a French Jew, the same way you
      >> look askance at Stern and Asheri out of their Israeli citizenship
      >> and presumed Zionism ? As for Meyer being old, it does not
      >> necessarily impugn its authority, for he was as splendid a
      >> classicist as well-informed a Semitic scholar and has been justly
      >> praised by the likes of Momigliano and Jacoby and Walbank. In
      >> Classics, age per se means nothing when the evidence has not vastly
      >> increased.
      >>
      >> R. Rollinger, 'The Terms "Assyria" and "Syria" Again', JNES 65,
      >> 2006, pp. 283-287, proves, in my eyes convincingly, that the eight-
      >> century Greeks encountered both Sura/i and Assura/i in their
      >> dealings with the people of the coastal provinces of the former
      >> Assyrian empire; these they rendered ??????? and ?????, bequeathing
      >> to later generations an indistinction that was to endure for
      >> centuries. The demonstrations of Nöldeke and Eduard Schwartz are
      >> thus vindicated.
      >>
      >> J.-F. Nardelli
      >> Université de Provence
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>
      >> ------------------------------------
      >>
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      >>
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      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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      > ------------------------------------
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    • frankclancy
      Dear Yigal - I knew about Albright but I did not know about Rainey. Honestly, I do not find the Tell el-Hammah identification credible. The inscription
      Message 62 of 62 , Mar 4 11:07 PM
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        Dear Yigal - I knew about Albright but I did not know about Rainey. Honestly, I do not find the Tell el-Hammah identification credible. The inscription indicates Hammath was the leader of the revolt which involved other cities - all of them larger and more important. It is Hammath that threatens the Egyptian garrison of Beth-Shean while it is Pehel who beseiges Tell Rehov. Also, if Hammath revolted against Rehob, then I would expect Rehob to attack Hammath - not the other way around. Also, if it were an inter-city squabble, why attack the Egyptian garrison? That is a revolt against Seti! Seti sent 3 arms of his troops to the cities which suggests more than a few soldiers to deal with these cities. Were it about a squabble between cities, then when Seti arrived at Beth-Shean I would expect these cities to appeal to him and there would be no need for troops to go to these cities.

        You may be correct about Hammath but I find it difficult to believe that story.

        Frank Clancy
        Kitchener, Ontario

        --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Yigal Levin <yigal.levin@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi again,
        >
        >
        >
        > Once more according to Rainey (Sacred Bridge p. 93, citing Albright from
        > 1926), the Hamath involved was the small site of Tell el-Hammah, 16 km south
        > of Beth-shean, which would make it about 10 km south of THAT Rehob. Rainey's
        > reconstruction is that Hamath was a vassal of Rehob (which is a much larger
        > site), and rebelled, encouraged by Pehel, Rehob's rival. Pehel and Hamath
        > first neutralized the Egyptian "police post" (Raney's words) at Beth-shean
        > and then attacked Rehob, at which point Seti intervened. We have no way of
        > knowing what Yenoam's role in the story was, only that Seti sent a force
        > there as well.
        >
        > It makes much more sense to read this as a minor squabble between rival
        > cities, all within a 20 km radius of Beth-shean, than as a major war
        > involving such far-away places as the north-Syrian Hamath. Remember that the
        > victory stele was set up at Beth-shean, and no mention of this has been
        > found in Egypt itself.
        >
        >
        >
        > Yigal
        >
        >
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