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Re: [ANE-2] "his seed is not"

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  • Thomas Verenna
    I think Thompson and Hjelm have the best treatment of this that I ve read. *The Victory Song of Merneptah, Israel, and the People of Palestine*
    Message 1 of 62 , Feb 25, 2013
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      I think Thompson and Hjelm have the best treatment of this that I've read.

      *The Victory Song of Merneptah, Israel, and the People of Palestine*

      http://jot.sagepub.com/content/27/1/3.abstract

      *Abstract: *

      This article discusses the nature of the association that can be
      established between the Merneptah stele and the later history of the region
      of Palestine and biblical Israel. This study examines aspects of the hymn�s
      rhetoric and literary metaphors, and discusses, among other things, the
      themes of Merneptah�s transcendent greatness and his mythic roles as savior
      of Memphis, universal mediator of divine grace and guardian of peace in
      terms of his divine ability to control destiny. In the hymn�s central
      movement, these stock tropes center on the theme of renewal. The final
      movement is not a song recounting Palestine�s conquest, but rather closes
      the hymn of victory over the Libyans with an idyllic portrayal of the
      �peace�, with which Merneptah has reestablished creation. His song of the
      nine bows celebrates the pharaoh�s universal patronage with illustrative
      reference to the region and towns of Palestine: Gaza, Ashkelon, Gezer and
      Yeno�am, which now belong to Egypt. Israel, metaphorically portrayed as the
      land of Hurru�s former husband, has been replaced by Merneptah�s patronage
      in a manner comparable to the well-known role that Yahweh plays in Hosea
      and Ezekiel as Jerusalem and Samaria�s *Ba�al*. Regionally, the
      geographical region referenced by the eponymic use of the name Israel in
      the stele corresponds with the Saul tradition�s Philistine area.
      Hope that helps.

      On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 11:51 AM, Lisbeth S. Fried <lizfried@...>wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Uh, Wikipedia.
      >
      > (Don't tell anybody.)
      >
      >
      > Liz
      >
      > Lisbeth S. Fried, Ph.D.
      > Department of Near Eastern Studies
      > and the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies
      > University of Michigan
      > 202 S. Thayer -- Room 4111
      > Ann Arbor, MI 48104
      > www.lisbethfried.com
      >
      > I sent (too much) rain on one city, and sent no rain on another city; and
      > still you did not return to me, says YHWH. (Amo 4:7-8 )
      >
      > From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      > Jgibson
      > Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 11:45 AM
      > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] "his seed is not"
      >
      >
      > On 2/25/2013 10:30 AM, Lisbeth S. Fried wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Dear All,
      > >
      > > The Mernepthah stele says about Israel that "his seed is not."
      > >
      > > I always thought it referred to Israel's progeny, that there won't be
      > future
      > > generations.
      > >
      > > Now I read that it refers to grain silos!
      >
      > Where did you read this?
      >
      > Jeffrey
      >
      > --
      > ---
      > Jeffrey B. Gibson D.Phil. Oxon.
      > 1500 W. Pratt Blvd
      > Chicago, IL
      > jgibson000@...
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Cordially,

      Thomas S. Verenna


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • frankclancy
      Dear Yigal - I knew about Albright but I did not know about Rainey. Honestly, I do not find the Tell el-Hammah identification credible. The inscription
      Message 62 of 62 , Mar 4, 2013
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        Dear Yigal - I knew about Albright but I did not know about Rainey. Honestly, I do not find the Tell el-Hammah identification credible. The inscription indicates Hammath was the leader of the revolt which involved other cities - all of them larger and more important. It is Hammath that threatens the Egyptian garrison of Beth-Shean while it is Pehel who beseiges Tell Rehov. Also, if Hammath revolted against Rehob, then I would expect Rehob to attack Hammath - not the other way around. Also, if it were an inter-city squabble, why attack the Egyptian garrison? That is a revolt against Seti! Seti sent 3 arms of his troops to the cities which suggests more than a few soldiers to deal with these cities. Were it about a squabble between cities, then when Seti arrived at Beth-Shean I would expect these cities to appeal to him and there would be no need for troops to go to these cities.

        You may be correct about Hammath but I find it difficult to believe that story.

        Frank Clancy
        Kitchener, Ontario

        --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Yigal Levin <yigal.levin@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi again,
        >
        >
        >
        > Once more according to Rainey (Sacred Bridge p. 93, citing Albright from
        > 1926), the Hamath involved was the small site of Tell el-Hammah, 16 km south
        > of Beth-shean, which would make it about 10 km south of THAT Rehob. Rainey's
        > reconstruction is that Hamath was a vassal of Rehob (which is a much larger
        > site), and rebelled, encouraged by Pehel, Rehob's rival. Pehel and Hamath
        > first neutralized the Egyptian "police post" (Raney's words) at Beth-shean
        > and then attacked Rehob, at which point Seti intervened. We have no way of
        > knowing what Yenoam's role in the story was, only that Seti sent a force
        > there as well.
        >
        > It makes much more sense to read this as a minor squabble between rival
        > cities, all within a 20 km radius of Beth-shean, than as a major war
        > involving such far-away places as the north-Syrian Hamath. Remember that the
        > victory stele was set up at Beth-shean, and no mention of this has been
        > found in Egypt itself.
        >
        >
        >
        > Yigal
        >
        >
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