Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [ANE-2] Archaeology of salvation

Expand Messages
  • Amanda-Alice Maravelia
    Dear Daniel: You are welcome. I would like you to look also at the following book, that conatins an other plausible explanation of the origin of the sign of
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 15, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Daniel:

      You are welcome. I would like you to look also at the following book, that conatins an other plausible
      explanation of the origin of the sign of life (anx) in ancient Egypt, through a forensic and anthropological
      approach:

      Gordon, A.H. & Schwabe, C.W.: The Quick and the Dead: Biomedical Theory in Ancient Egypt, Leiden (Brill�Styx) 2004.

      Best wishes,

      A.-A.M.






      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      From: dgrolin@...
      Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2012 08:30:28 -0800
      Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Archaeology of salvation





      Dear Amanda-Alice,

      Thank you for sharing these thoughts and references. One thing in particular struck me was the survey Jan Zandee in �Death as an Enemy: According to Ancient Egyptian Conceptions�. There were some remarkable advances happening in Egypt, in part in the field of surgery. Typically such advances happen by exploring the corpses of the dead. The image of weighing a man�s heart to determine what kind of life he led has an oddly medical echo to it. I wonder if medical advances and the exploration of the dead body lead to recast what happened to the dead. This could be part of the turns I am looking for in my archeology of salvation. Thanks.

      Regards,

      Daniel Grolin
      �rhus, DK

      >________________________________
      > From: Amanda-Alice Maravelia <a_maravelia@...>
      >To: "ane-2@yahoogroups.com" <ane-2@yahoogroups.com>
      >Sent: Wednesday, 12 December 2012, 20:29
      >Subject: RE: [ANE-2] Archaeology of salvation
      >
      >
      >
      >Good Day Mr Grolin:
      >
      >Interesting questions, indeed! The idea of salvation should be initially sought for in the ancient Egyptian
      >funerary beliefs, especially in the last judgement and the weighing of the heart. I am giving the following
      >works that might help:
      >
      >- Book of the Dead, mainly Spells 125 and 30. *** Definitely these ideas date back to the OK and the
      >Pyramid Texts, so it is not just a late NK product!
      >- Zandee, J.: �Death as an Enemy according to Ancient Egyptian Conceptions�, Studies in the History of Reli�gions:
      >Supplements to Numen, 5, Leiden 1960, 25-31.
      >
      >An ancient Egyptian instance that could be characterized as "cosmopolitan" and definitely "non-nationa-
      >listic" is the Great Hymn to the Aten of Pharaoh Amenophis IV./Akhenaten, for which see also:
      >
      >Redford, D.B.: Egypt, Canaan, and Israel in Ancient Times, NJ (Princeton University Press) 1992.
      >
      >The ideas of the Orphics (i.e.: those found in the ORPHIC HYMNS, not in the Lithika, & c.) are definitely
      >much older than the era of their gathering by the doxographs of Peisistratos, that is 6th c. BC. This has
      >been proven on the basis of archaeoastronomical evidence. The fact that the Orphic texts were used in
      >a syncretistic manner, especially during the very Late Era is another thing ...
      >
      >Some works on the function and salvation of the person in Middle Eastern religions, you may find in:
      >
      >- Hornung, E.: Die Anf�nge von Monotheismus und Trinit�t in �gypten: Der eine Gott und der drei-
      >eine Gott: Das Gottes�ver�st�ndris bei Christen, Juden und Muslimen (Rahner, K., ed.), M�nchen (Schnell
      >& Steiner) 1983, 48-66.
      >- Rupp, A.: Vergehen und Bleiben: Religionsgeschichtliche Studien zum Personenverst�ndnis in �gypten und im Al�ten
      >Testa�ment, Saarbr�cken 1976.
      >
      >Finally, provided that you can read Hellenic there is a big and rich number of works on the Christian (and
      >Paulian) consideration of salvation in the works of the Orthodox Fathers of Chriatianity, which you can find in
      >the Patrologia Graeca. The basic doctrine is the salvation through the crucifying-death and Resurrection of the
      >Christ, a fact that makes us as Orthodox Christians to celebrate the crucifixion in a "resurrectional" way,
      >while e.g.: the Roman Catholics celebrate even Easter in a rather "crucifixional" way. Please do not consider
      >these remarks as hints against non-Orthodox Christians, I am a very open-mided person ...
      >
      >Last but not least, I would highly recomend the book of the current Pontiff on Christ:
      >
      >Jesus von Nazareth - 1. Teil: Von der Taufe im Jordan bis zur Verkl�rung, Milano (RCS Libri S.p.A.) 2007,
      >
      >where Pope Benedikt XVI. makes many comparisons between Christianism and Judaism, through the eyes
      >of a Jewish Priest. I hope this helps.
      >
      >Best regards,
      >
      >Dr. Dr. Amanda-Alice Maravelia
      >
      >Hellenic Institute of Egyptology
      >http://hiegaker.wordpress.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >To: ane-2@yahoogroups.com
      >From: dgrolin@...
      >Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2012 06:49:18 -0800
      >Subject: [ANE-2] Archaeology of salvation
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >Dear everyone,
      >
      >I am trying to uncover the various turns
      >(in Foucaultian terms) in the idea of salvation. As I read the Hebrew Bible, it
      >seems that salvation is closely tied to the idea of a national covenant, and
      >that salvation with the territorial integrity of the Hebrew people. I have the
      >studied the development of individualism in the wake of the collapse of
      >Feudalism in Europe and the proliferation of class. However, it seems to me
      >that there were significant turns before that. Surely the cosmopolitanism that
      >Hellenism brought dislodged the individual�s relationship with religious
      >affiliations from the geographic origin, but did this reorient ideas about one�s
      >ultimate end to a blessed or damned afterlife? If so I don�t see why. Were some
      >mystery religions such as the Orphic mysteries attractive because of the
      >promise of personal salvation, or is that an anachronistic reading? What is
      >Josephus doing when he is exploring the sect of Judaism that he wants to
      >follow? How would someone in the ANE interpret Jesus healing a person, as the
      >salvation of an individual or a member of the whole? What about Paul�s concept
      >of salvation? I suspect that these answers are relevant, but I am unsure. Are
      >there any good studies on this?
      >
      >Any help is appreciated.
      >
      >Warm regards,
      >
      >Daniel Grolin
      >�rhus (no institutional affiliation)
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >------------------------------------
      >
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.