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Physiology in Mesopotamia

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  • Richard Whitekettle
    Can anyone point me to work that has been done on physiology in Mesopotamian thought? I m thinking in particular of the lungs, heart, and vascular system. So
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 27, 2012
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      Can anyone point me to work that has been done on physiology in Mesopotamian thought? I'm thinking in particular of the lungs, heart, and vascular system. So essentially I'm looking for work that has been done on Mesopotamian thought regarding the physiology of blood and breathing.

      I already have Oppenheim's 1962 Orientalia article on the pulse, Adamson's 1984 article on Akkadian anatomical terms which deals with the word ushultu.

      Thanks for any help.

      Richard Whitekettle
      Dept of Religion
      Calvin College


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Cynthia Jean
      This one comes to my mind: M.J. Geller s paper Phlegm and Breath (p. 187-199) in: Irving L. FINKEL and Markham J. GELLER (eds.) – Disease in Babylonia.
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 27, 2012
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        This one comes to my mind: M.J. Geller's paper "Phlegm and Breath" (p. 187-199) in:

        Irving
        L. FINKEL and Markham J. GELLER (eds.) – Disease
        in Babylonia. Cuneiform Monographs 36, Brill, Leiden – Boston, 2007


        Cynthia JEAN
         

        Attachée scientifique aux Musées Royaux d'art et d'histoire (Bruxelles) - PAI "Mésopotamie"
        Collaboratrice scientifique - Centre Interdisciplinaire d'Etudes des religions et de la laicité (ULB), Brussels



        ________________________________
        From: Richard Whitekettle <rwhiteke@...>
        To: ANE-2 <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, 27 November 2012, 18:54
        Subject: [ANE-2] Physiology in Mesopotamia


         
        Can anyone point me to work that has been done on physiology in Mesopotamian thought? I'm thinking in particular of the lungs, heart, and vascular system. So essentially I'm looking for work that has been done on Mesopotamian thought regarding the physiology of blood and breathing.

        I already have Oppenheim's 1962 Orientalia article on the pulse, Adamson's 1984 article on Akkadian anatomical terms which deals with the word ushultu.

        Thanks for any help.

        Richard Whitekettle
        Dept of Religion
        Calvin College

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Peter T. Daniels
        Have you seen Jo Ann Scurlock s massive tome on Mesopotamian medicine? (I don t know the details.) -- Peter T. Daniels grammatim@verizon.net Jersey City From:
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 27, 2012
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          Have you seen Jo Ann Scurlock's massive tome on Mesopotamian medicine? (I don't know the details.)


          --
          Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
          Jersey City

          From: Cynthia Jean <chutneythebull@...>
          >To: "ANE-2@yahoogroups.com" <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
          >Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2012 3:01 PM
          >Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Physiology in Mesopotamia
          >

          >This one comes to my mind: M.J. Geller's paper "Phlegm and Breath" (p. 187-199) in:
          >
          >Irving
          >L. FINKEL and Markham J. GELLER (eds.) – Disease
          >in Babylonia. Cuneiform Monographs 36, Brill, Leiden – Boston, 2007
          >
          >Cynthia JEAN

          >
          >Attachée scientifique aux Musées Royaux d'art et d'histoire (Bruxelles) - PAI "Mésopotamie"
          >Collaboratrice scientifique - Centre Interdisciplinaire d'Etudes des religions et de la laicité (ULB), Brussels
          >
          >________________________________
          >From: Richard Whitekettle <mailto:rwhiteke%40CALVIN.EDU>
          >To: ANE-2 <mailto:ANE-2%40yahoogroups.com>
          >Sent: Tuesday, 27 November 2012, 18:54
          >Subject: [ANE-2] Physiology in Mesopotamia
          >
          >

          >Can anyone point me to work that has been done on physiology in Mesopotamian thought? I'm thinking in particular of the lungs, heart, and vascular system. So essentially I'm looking for work that has been done on Mesopotamian thought regarding the physiology of blood and breathing.
          >
          >I already have Oppenheim's 1962 Orientalia article on the pulse, Adamson's 1984 article on Akkadian anatomical terms which deals with the word ushultu.
          >
          >Thanks for any help.
          >
          >Richard Whitekettle
          >Dept of Religion
          >Calvin College

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Duane Smith
          Scurlock has two rather massive works on Mesopotamian medicine. Perhaps the most relevant to the question at hand is co-written with Burton Andersen:
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 27, 2012
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            Scurlock has two rather massive works on Mesopotamian medicine. Perhaps the most relevant to the question at hand is co-written with Burton Andersen:



            Scurlock, JoAnn and Burton R. Andersen, Diagnoses in Assyrian and Babylonian Medicine: Ancient Sources, Translations, and Modern Medical Analyses (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005).



            I don’t have it close by so I’m not sure it addresses the exact question but it is a good place to start.



            Her other massive volume,



            Magico-Medical Means of Treating Ghost-Induced Illnesses in Ancient Mesopotamia. Ancient Magic and Divination 3 (Leiden/Boston: Brill/Styx, 2006),



            may not be as helpful but is worth looking at.



            Duane Smith





            From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Peter T. Daniels
            Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2012 2:51 PM
            To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Physiology in Mesopotamia





            Have you seen Jo Ann Scurlock's massive tome on Mesopotamian medicine? (I don't know the details.)








            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jean-Fabrice Nardelli
            See J. Scurlock and B. R. Andersen, Diagnoses and Babylonian Medicine : Ancient Sources, Translations, and Modern Medical Analyses. Translated and with
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 27, 2012
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              See J. Scurlock and B. R. Andersen, Diagnoses and Babylonian Medicine :
              Ancient Sources, Translations, and Modern Medical Analyses. Translated
              and with Commentary (Urbana, 2005), pp. 165-184 (cardiopulmonrary
              system) ; Scurlock, Magico-Medical Means of Treating Ghost-Induced
              Illness in Ancient Mesopotamia (Leiden & Boston, 2006), pp. 69-70 and
              notes 1173-1178 on 150 (shortness of breath) ; M. Jaques, Le vocabulaire
              des sentiments dans les textes sumériens. Recherche sur le lexique
              sumérien et akkadien (Münster, 2006), pp. 219-223 (Sumerian ŠA3.SAG3,
              'smite / strike / hurt the heart' ~ UR5 UG7/UG5, 'kill / hurt the
              lungs') and 271-278 (Sum. ŠA3 KUŠ2(-U3), 'afflict the heart') ; J.-J.
              Glassner, ‘Écrire des livres à l’époque paléo-babylonienne : le traité
              d’extispicine’, Zeitschrift für Assyriologie... 99, 2009, pp. 1-81 at
              30-32 (parts of the liver).

              J.-F. Nardelli
              Université de Provence


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