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re: coroplast, coroplastic

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  • Charles J
    The oldest reference cited sub coroplast in the OED is: 1885 Nation (N.Y.) 1 Oct. 286/3 The Myrinæan coroplasts, or manufacturers of terra-cottas, were
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 3, 2012
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      The oldest reference cited sub coroplast in the OED is:
      "1885 Nation (N.Y.) 1 Oct. 286/3 The Myrinæan coroplasts, or manufacturers of terra-cottas, were certainly influenced by the models of their brethren in Tanagra."

      Charting the two words in Google ngram shows some (perhaps) interesting patterns:
      http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=coroplast%2Ccoroplastic&year_start=1700&year_end=2012&corpus=0&smoothing=3

      It is certainly not uncommon usage in English language archaeology writing.

      I think we can call the topic closed.

      Did anyone on ANE-2 (aside from me) participate in the Day of Archaeology (http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/)?

      -Chuck Jones-
      ISAW - NYU



      --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, drbrucekgardner@... wrote:
      >
      > Dear ANE,
      >
      > By way of a supporting reference to CSIG's own, offered etymology,
      > mentioned in my previous post, one also finds the term in a study of the Black Sea
      > site of Phanagoria, which was founded in the 6th. Century BCE.
      >
      > The author writes: 'In another workshop dated to the 6th c. BC a
      > "coroplastes" â€" a producer of terracotta figurines - worked.' [Podossinov Alexander,
      > "Phanagoria (Antiquity)", 2007, Encyclopaedia of the Hellenic World, Black
      > Sea, p. 4.]
      >
      > Follow this link and see the top of page 4:
      > _http://blacksea.ehw.gr/forms/filePage.aspx?lemmaId=10738_
      > (http://blacksea.ehw.gr/forms/filePage.aspx?lemmaId=10738)
      >
      > Thank you.
      >
      > Yours sincerely,
      >
      > Bruce Gardner.
      > ________________________
      > Dr. Bruce Gardner (Rtd.)
      > Aberdeen
      > Scotland, UK.
      >
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 03/07/2012 11:45:03 GMT Daylight Time,
      > drbrucekgardner@... writes:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dear ANE,
      >
      > The CSIG website offers this etymology: "The CSIG takes its name from the
      > word koroplastes, which in Greek antiquity was the term used for a modeler
      > of images in clay."
      >
      > Yours sincerely,
      >
      > Bruce Gardner.
      > ________________________
      > Dr. Bruce Gardner (Rtd.)
      > Aberdeen
      > Scotland, UK.
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 03/07/2012 05:42:30 GMT Daylight Time,
      > _beahopkinson@..._ (mailto:beahopkinson@...) writes:
      >
      > Peter,
      >
      > What a strange combination, my translator gave plastic for platique (a non
      > brainer), but Wikipedia did better. It tells us it is a Portuguese
      > pronunciation for cry or lament in populat music instrumental style. Its
      > origins in 19th c. Rio de Janeiro. A style characterized by imprvisation
      > and
      > subtile modulations...etc.etc. which could account for the 'platique' as
      > flexible??
      >
      > Bea
      >
      > Beatrice Hopkinson, Hon. Secretary
      > LA Branch, Oxford University Society,
      > President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust,
      > Board, American Institute of Archaeology,
      > Affiliate, Cotson Institute
      >
      > Hope this helps.
      >
      > On Jul 2, 2012, at 8:18 AM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
      >
      > Can anyone tell me what the French art historical and archeological term
      > "choroplastique" means? It doesn't seem to have a dictionary entry
      > anywhere;
      > google shows a handful of occurrences suggesting it refers either to very
      > small figurines or the material they're made of.
      >
      > What is the English for this?
      >
      > (It's also a term in biochemistry, but that doesn't help.)
      > --
      > Peter T. Daniels __grammatim@..._ (mailto:_grammatim@...) _
      > (mailto:_grammatim@..._ (mailto:grammatim@...) )
      >
      > Jersey City
      >
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