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Re: [ANE-2] choroplastique

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  • Beatrice Hopkinson
    Peter, What a strange combination, my translator gave plastic for platique (a non brainer), but Wikipedia did better. It tells us it is a Portuguese
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 2, 2012
      Peter,

      What a strange combination, my translator gave plastic for platique (a non brainer), but Wikipedia did better. It tells us it is a Portuguese
      pronunciation for cry or lament in populat music instrumental style. Its origins in 19th c. Rio de Janeiro. A style characterized by imprvisation and subtile modulations...etc.etc. which could account for the 'platique' as flexible??

      Bea

      Beatrice Hopkinson, Hon. Secretary
      LA Branch, Oxford University Society,
      President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust,
      Board, American Institute of Archaeology,
      Affiliate, Cotson Institute

      Hope this helps.


      On Jul 2, 2012, at 8:18 AM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

      Can anyone tell me what the French art historical and archeological term "choroplastique" means? It doesn't seem to have a dictionary entry anywhere; google shows a handful of occurrences suggesting it refers either to very small figurines or the material they're made of.

      What is the English for this?

      (It's also a term in biochemistry, but that doesn't help.)
      --
      Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...

      Jersey City

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • drbrucekgardner@aol.com
      Dear ANE, The CSIG website offers this etymology: The CSIG takes its name from the word koroplastes, which in Greek antiquity was the term used for a
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 3, 2012
        Dear ANE,

        The CSIG website offers this etymology: "The CSIG takes its name from the
        word koroplastes, which in Greek antiquity was the term used for a modeler
        of images in clay."

        Yours sincerely,

        Bruce Gardner.
        ________________________
        Dr. Bruce Gardner (Rtd.)
        Aberdeen
        Scotland, UK.



        In a message dated 03/07/2012 05:42:30 GMT Daylight Time,
        beahopkinson@... writes:




        Peter,

        What a strange combination, my translator gave plastic for platique (a non
        brainer), but Wikipedia did better. It tells us it is a Portuguese
        pronunciation for cry or lament in populat music instrumental style. Its
        origins in 19th c. Rio de Janeiro. A style characterized by imprvisation and
        subtile modulations...etc.etc. which could account for the 'platique' as
        flexible??

        Bea

        Beatrice Hopkinson, Hon. Secretary
        LA Branch, Oxford University Society,
        President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust,
        Board, American Institute of Archaeology,
        Affiliate, Cotson Institute

        Hope this helps.

        On Jul 2, 2012, at 8:18 AM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

        Can anyone tell me what the French art historical and archeological term
        "choroplastique" means? It doesn't seem to have a dictionary entry anywhere;
        google shows a handful of occurrences suggesting it refers either to very
        small figurines or the material they're made of.

        What is the English for this?

        (It's also a term in biochemistry, but that doesn't help.)
        --
        Peter T. Daniels _grammatim@..._ (mailto:grammatim@...)

        Jersey City

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • drbrucekgardner@aol.com
        Dear ANE, By way of a supporting reference to CSIG s own, offered etymology, mentioned in my previous post, one also finds the term in a study of the Black
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 3, 2012
          Dear ANE,

          By way of a supporting reference to CSIG's own, offered etymology,
          mentioned in my previous post, one also finds the term in a study of the Black Sea
          site of Phanagoria, which was founded in the 6th. Century BCE.

          The author writes: 'In another workshop dated to the 6th c. BC a
          "coroplastes" – a producer of terracotta figurines - worked.' [Podossinov Alexander,
          "Phanagoria (Antiquity)", 2007, Encyclopaedia of the Hellenic World, Black
          Sea, p. 4.]

          Follow this link and see the top of page 4:
          _http://blacksea.ehw.gr/forms/filePage.aspx?lemmaId=10738_
          (http://blacksea.ehw.gr/forms/filePage.aspx?lemmaId=10738)

          Thank you.

          Yours sincerely,

          Bruce Gardner.
          ________________________
          Dr. Bruce Gardner (Rtd.)
          Aberdeen
          Scotland, UK.



          In a message dated 03/07/2012 11:45:03 GMT Daylight Time,
          drbrucekgardner@... writes:




          Dear ANE,

          The CSIG website offers this etymology: "The CSIG takes its name from the
          word koroplastes, which in Greek antiquity was the term used for a modeler
          of images in clay."

          Yours sincerely,

          Bruce Gardner.
          ________________________
          Dr. Bruce Gardner (Rtd.)
          Aberdeen
          Scotland, UK.


          In a message dated 03/07/2012 05:42:30 GMT Daylight Time,
          _beahopkinson@..._ (mailto:beahopkinson@...) writes:

          Peter,

          What a strange combination, my translator gave plastic for platique (a non
          brainer), but Wikipedia did better. It tells us it is a Portuguese
          pronunciation for cry or lament in populat music instrumental style. Its
          origins in 19th c. Rio de Janeiro. A style characterized by imprvisation
          and
          subtile modulations...etc.etc. which could account for the 'platique' as
          flexible??

          Bea

          Beatrice Hopkinson, Hon. Secretary
          LA Branch, Oxford University Society,
          President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust,
          Board, American Institute of Archaeology,
          Affiliate, Cotson Institute

          Hope this helps.

          On Jul 2, 2012, at 8:18 AM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

          Can anyone tell me what the French art historical and archeological term
          "choroplastique" means? It doesn't seem to have a dictionary entry
          anywhere;
          google shows a handful of occurrences suggesting it refers either to very
          small figurines or the material they're made of.

          What is the English for this?

          (It's also a term in biochemistry, but that doesn't help.)
          --
          Peter T. Daniels __grammatim@..._ (mailto:_grammatim@...) _
          (mailto:_grammatim@..._ (mailto:grammatim@...) )

          Jersey City

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Charles J
          The oldest reference cited sub coroplast in the OED is: 1885 Nation (N.Y.) 1 Oct. 286/3 The Myrinæan coroplasts, or manufacturers of terra-cottas, were
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 3, 2012
            The oldest reference cited sub coroplast in the OED is:
            "1885 Nation (N.Y.) 1 Oct. 286/3 The Myrinæan coroplasts, or manufacturers of terra-cottas, were certainly influenced by the models of their brethren in Tanagra."

            Charting the two words in Google ngram shows some (perhaps) interesting patterns:
            http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=coroplast%2Ccoroplastic&year_start=1700&year_end=2012&corpus=0&smoothing=3

            It is certainly not uncommon usage in English language archaeology writing.

            I think we can call the topic closed.

            Did anyone on ANE-2 (aside from me) participate in the Day of Archaeology (http://www.dayofarchaeology.com/)?

            -Chuck Jones-
            ISAW - NYU



            --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, drbrucekgardner@... wrote:
            >
            > Dear ANE,
            >
            > By way of a supporting reference to CSIG's own, offered etymology,
            > mentioned in my previous post, one also finds the term in a study of the Black Sea
            > site of Phanagoria, which was founded in the 6th. Century BCE.
            >
            > The author writes: 'In another workshop dated to the 6th c. BC a
            > "coroplastes" â€" a producer of terracotta figurines - worked.' [Podossinov Alexander,
            > "Phanagoria (Antiquity)", 2007, Encyclopaedia of the Hellenic World, Black
            > Sea, p. 4.]
            >
            > Follow this link and see the top of page 4:
            > _http://blacksea.ehw.gr/forms/filePage.aspx?lemmaId=10738_
            > (http://blacksea.ehw.gr/forms/filePage.aspx?lemmaId=10738)
            >
            > Thank you.
            >
            > Yours sincerely,
            >
            > Bruce Gardner.
            > ________________________
            > Dr. Bruce Gardner (Rtd.)
            > Aberdeen
            > Scotland, UK.
            >
            >
            >
            > In a message dated 03/07/2012 11:45:03 GMT Daylight Time,
            > drbrucekgardner@... writes:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Dear ANE,
            >
            > The CSIG website offers this etymology: "The CSIG takes its name from the
            > word koroplastes, which in Greek antiquity was the term used for a modeler
            > of images in clay."
            >
            > Yours sincerely,
            >
            > Bruce Gardner.
            > ________________________
            > Dr. Bruce Gardner (Rtd.)
            > Aberdeen
            > Scotland, UK.
            >
            >
            > In a message dated 03/07/2012 05:42:30 GMT Daylight Time,
            > _beahopkinson@..._ (mailto:beahopkinson@...) writes:
            >
            > Peter,
            >
            > What a strange combination, my translator gave plastic for platique (a non
            > brainer), but Wikipedia did better. It tells us it is a Portuguese
            > pronunciation for cry or lament in populat music instrumental style. Its
            > origins in 19th c. Rio de Janeiro. A style characterized by imprvisation
            > and
            > subtile modulations...etc.etc. which could account for the 'platique' as
            > flexible??
            >
            > Bea
            >
            > Beatrice Hopkinson, Hon. Secretary
            > LA Branch, Oxford University Society,
            > President, Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological Trust,
            > Board, American Institute of Archaeology,
            > Affiliate, Cotson Institute
            >
            > Hope this helps.
            >
            > On Jul 2, 2012, at 8:18 AM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
            >
            > Can anyone tell me what the French art historical and archeological term
            > "choroplastique" means? It doesn't seem to have a dictionary entry
            > anywhere;
            > google shows a handful of occurrences suggesting it refers either to very
            > small figurines or the material they're made of.
            >
            > What is the English for this?
            >
            > (It's also a term in biochemistry, but that doesn't help.)
            > --
            > Peter T. Daniels __grammatim@..._ (mailto:_grammatim@...) _
            > (mailto:_grammatim@..._ (mailto:grammatim@...) )
            >
            > Jersey City
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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