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Letter from the new Editor of Near Eastern Archaeology

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  • Charles E. Jones
    The latest issue of Near Eastern Archaeology is available now on JSTOR http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5615/neareastarch.75.issue-2 From the Editor It gives me
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 11 1:13 PM
      The latest issue of Near Eastern Archaeology is available now on JSTOR
      http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5615/neareastarch.75.issue-2

      From the Editor

      It gives me great pleasure, at the new Editor of Near Eastern Archaeology, to present the June issue of the journal. Publishing Near Eastern Archaeology continues to be both a challenge and an opportunity. The challenge is to present, in single issues of just 64 pages, snapshots of the different civilizations of this vast area through the several millennia of their history and of the diversity of modern scholarship. Is there anything like an “ancient Near East,” defined by similar ideas and embraced by a common past? How can we hope to understand those cultures in light of the fragmentary nature of the evidence and our different modern mentalities? How do we inform our readers in a meaningful and accessible way of the controversial debates and the often highly specialized scholarly methods and approaches? At the same time, Near Eastern Archaeology offers the opportunity of engaging a wide audience of readers in what constitutes a major and indispensable part of the human experience, a history that is inextricably intertwined with the present Middle East through the region’s cultural heritage, its religious traditions and its political and intellectual legacy. The June issue tries to present a glimpse of the many aspects that the ancient Near East presents to us. Its five articles feature a wide variety of geographic regions and time periods: from Anatolia through the Jordan Valley and from Judea to Egypt and Dilmun, from the fourth millennium B.C.E. to the Byzantine period. In terms of its contents, the issue deals with toilet archaeology, forensic facial reconstruction, monumental rock art, material evidence for local administration, and the evolution and demise of a prominent city on the shore of Lake Kinneret in the Early Bronze Age...

      Read the rest at the ASOR blog:
      http://asorblog.org/?p=2485

      -Chuck Jones-
      Chair - ASOR Committee on Publications
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