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re: Large scale grant from SSHRC to study the EB at Tell es-Safi/Gath

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  • aren
    Dear all, Please note the following exciting announcement from Haskel Greenfield and myself. Best Aren Maeir gath.wordpress.com Prof. Haskel Greenfield
    Message 1 of 4 , May 27, 2012
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      Dear all,
      Please note the following exciting announcement from Haskel Greenfield and myself.

      Best
      Aren Maeir
      gath.wordpress.com


      Prof. Haskel Greenfield (University of Manitoba) and Prof. Aren Maeir (Bar-Ilan University) have been awarded a seven year, large-scale grant from the Canadian government's Social Science and Humanities Research Council for the study of the Early Bronze Age remains at the site of Tell es-Safi/Gath in Israel.
      The project is entitled "The nature of early urban neighbourhoods in the southern Levant: Early Bronze Age at Tell es-Safi", and will involve five years of excavation and two years of post-excavation analysis.
      The CAN$2.7 million grant (with institutional matching actually reaching close to CAN$4 million) aims to carry out an interdisciplinary study of the Early Bronze Age III city at Tell es-Safi/Gath, with particular focus on the non-elite neighborhoods. In collaboration with a diverse group of scholars from Canada, Israel and other countries, and utilizing macro- and micro-archaeological perspectives, they plan to study facets of daily life in one of the larger cities of the first stage of urban culture in the Southern Levant. The large scale funding will enable a broad range of cutting technological and analytical techniques to be used in this research, as well as comprehensive training of the next generation of students.
      This research is conducted as part of the Tell es-Safi/Gath Archaeological Project, directed by Prof. Aren Maeir, which is a long-term project (commenced in 1996) aimed at studying the cultural and environmental history of the site of Tell es-Safi/Gath and its environs.
    • Jim West
      That s really fantastic, Aren! Congrats to all of you!! ... -- ++++ Jim West, ThD Petros TN
      Message 2 of 4 , May 27, 2012
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        That's really fantastic, Aren! Congrats to all of you!!

        On 5/27/2012 2:36 PM, aren wrote:
        > Prof. Haskel Greenfield (University of Manitoba) and Prof. Aren Maeir (Bar-Ilan University) have been awarded a seven year, large-scale grant from the Canadian government's Social Science and Humanities Research Council for the study of the Early Bronze Age remains at the site of Tell es-Safi/Gath in Israel.
        > The project is entitled "The nature of early urban neighbourhoods in the southern Levant: Early Bronze Age at Tell es-Safi", and will involve five years of excavation and two years of post-excavation analysis.
        > The CAN$2.7 million grant (with institutional matching actually reaching close to CAN$4 million) aims to carry out an interdisciplinary study of the Early Bronze Age III city at Tell es-Safi/Gath, with particular focus on the non-elite neighborhoods. In collaboration with a diverse group of scholars from Canada, Israel and other countries, and utilizing macro- and micro-archaeological perspectives, they plan to study facets of daily life in one of the larger cities of the first stage of urban culture in the Southern Levant. The large scale funding will enable a broad range of cutting technological and analytical techniques to be used in this research, as well as comprehensive training of the next generation of students.
        > This research is conducted as part of the Tell es-Safi/Gath Archaeological Project, directed by Prof. Aren Maeir, which is a long-term project (commenced in 1996) aimed at studying the cultural and environmental history of the site of Tell es-Safi/Gath and its environs.


        --
        ++++

        Jim West, ThD
        Petros TN
      • Brian Colless
        Aren, this is certainly good news. Unfortunately you will be fossicking [Australasian colloquial] in an area where inscriptions are unlikely to be found; but
        Message 3 of 4 , May 29, 2012
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          Aren, this is certainly good news.

          Unfortunately you will be fossicking [Australasian colloquial] in an
          area where inscriptions are unlikely to be found; but if you uncover
          any EBA texts and if they are not cuneiform or Egyptian, but West
          Semitic syllabic, please put them on open access quickly.

          The earliest examples I know are on two funerary amulets from Umm el-
          Marra (Tuba); they did not work, as they have been broken into pieces.
          They date to at least 2300 BCE.

          http://cryptcracker.blogspot.co.nz/2007/03/oldest-west-semitic-inscriptions-these.html

          Brian Colless
          Massey University
          New Zealand

          On 28/05/2012, at 6:36 AM, aren wrote:

          > Dear all,
          > Please note the following exciting announcement from Haskel
          > Greenfield and myself.
          >
          > Best
          > Aren Maeir
          > gath.wordpress.com
          >
          > Prof. Haskel Greenfield (University of Manitoba) and Prof. Aren
          > Maeir (Bar-Ilan University) have been awarded a seven year, large-
          > scale grant from the Canadian government's Social Science and
          > Humanities Research Council for the study of the Early Bronze Age
          > remains at the site of Tell es-Safi/Gath in Israel.
          > The project is entitled "The nature of early urban neighbourhoods in
          > the southern Levant: Early Bronze Age at Tell es-Safi", and will
          > involve five years of excavation and two years of post-excavation
          > analysis.
          > The CAN$2.7 million grant (with institutional matching actually
          > reaching close to CAN$4 million) aims to carry out an
          > interdisciplinary study of the Early Bronze Age III city at Tell es-
          > Safi/Gath, with particular focus on the non-elite neighborhoods. In
          > collaboration with a diverse group of scholars from Canada, Israel
          > and other countries, and utilizing macro- and micro-archaeological
          > perspectives, they plan to study facets of daily life in one of the
          > larger cities of the first stage of urban culture in the Southern
          > Levant. The large scale funding will enable a broad range of cutting
          > technological and analytical techniques to be used in this research,
          > as well as comprehensive training of the next generation of students.
          > This research is conducted as part of the Tell es-Safi/Gath
          > Archaeological Project, directed by Prof. Aren Maeir, which is a
          > long-term project (commenced in 1996) aimed at studying the cultural
          > and environmental history of the site of Tell es-Safi/Gath and its
          > environs.
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • aren
          Brian, Thanks. Not that we excavate for inscriptions only, but I agree it would be nice (but rather unlikely) to find an inscription (ANY!) in an EB context in
          Message 4 of 4 , May 29, 2012
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            Brian,
            Thanks. Not that we excavate for inscriptions only, but I agree it would be nice (but rather unlikely) to find an inscription (ANY!) in an EB context in Canaan.
            As to publication - at Safi we usually don't have a problem with publishing important finds (and finds in general) in time...

            Do check out the renewed facebook page of the project at: TellesSafiGath

            Aren Maeir
            gath.wordpress.com
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