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Re: [ANE-2] the greatest Semitic Epigraphy hoax of all

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  • Brian Colless
    ... Yes, with regard to the Izbet Sartah Ostracon, on one of my websites (at the bottom of the page) I have just posted a photograph of a photograph that was
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 22, 2012
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      On 22/04/2012, Peter T. Daniels wrote (and see further, below):

      > There Is No Izbet Sartah Inscription! The sherd is completely blank!
      > Next to it is the familiar drawing of what may have appeared on it
      > decades ago.
      >
      Yes, with regard to the Izbet Sartah Ostracon, on one of my websites
      (at the bottom of the page) I have just posted a photograph of a
      photograph that was taken for me thirty years ago.

      http://cryptcracker.blogspot.co.nz/2007/01/ancient-abagadary-abecedary-this-is.html

      Neither of the photographs of photographs I offer there are useful for
      studying the text, but there is a legible drawing.

      The full version of my case (with a much better photograph) for
      reading it as an Israelite student-scribe's legacy to posterity (a
      sort of time-capsule, deposited in a silo) is found under West
      Semitic scripts: Musings of a student scribe, in my own private
      "museum-theatre" at

      http://sites.google.com/site/collesseum/

      I have mentioned here previously that our late friend Ariel had done a
      lot of work highlighting the characters on the document, and he made
      his results available to me.

      Most of the letters are legible and the text is readable when the
      principles of writing with the proto-alphabet are recognized.


      As for the Qeiyafa Ostracon, we discussed it here when it was first
      announced, and the first line was understood as opening with a
      sequence ' L T ` S� (Do not do/make). I protested that there were many
      other possibilities, and eventually I realized it was not a S/Shin but
      Nun, followed by a Qaw, hence ' L T ` N Q ("The cursing of the Anak",
      or "Anak, you have cursed...").

      In line 3, B ` L was noticed from the start, but GLYT and DWD either
      side of it were overlooked.

      Recently I found the divine name YH (Yahu) in the top right corner.

      I have not issued my latest drawing of the five lines of text, but the
      work in progress can be seen here:

      http://bonzoz.blogspot.co.nz/

      And a detailed argument here:

      https://sites.google.com/site/collesseum/qeiyafa-ostracon-1

      Brian Colless
      Research Associate, School of History, Massey University, NZ

      On 22/04/2012, at 12:17 AM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

      > On Wednesday I visited the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. I was
      > overwhelmed to see such treasures as the Tell Dan inscription (with
      > "bytdwd" highlighted with chalk infill), a number of Arad letters,
      > the Mesad Heshavyahu ostracon [the guide had a funny explanation of
      > why the guy had lost his coat], the Qeiyafa ostracon -- and right
      > next to it, the Izbet Sartah sherd. I don't even say Ostracon,
      > because There Is No Izbet Sartah Inscription! The sherd is
      > completely blank! Next to it is the familiar drawing of what may
      > have appeared on it decades ago.
      >
      > But seriously, folks, what if it were lit with, say, a UV spotlight?
      > Would that make the traces visible to the viewer outside the case?
      > --
      > Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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