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Re: [ANE-2] Archaeologists discover name of lost pharaonic king

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  • Ian Onvlee
    Robert, Exactly. You understood correctly. However, I expect a spokesman likethe Egyptian Minister of State for Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim Ali to be more
    Message 1 of 62 , Mar 6, 2012
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      Robert,

      Exactly. You understood correctly.


      However, I expect a spokesman likethe Egyptian Minister of State for
      Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim Ali to be more truthful and not engage in sensationalistic journalism. But I suspect that the author of the article deliberately twisted his words slightly, which were likely spoken in Arabic. Instead of "Unknown" the minister most likely said "unattested", which is perfectly correct. A more informative article is found at http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/35984/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Gate-found-in-Karnak-Temple-adds-new-name-to-ancie.aspx


      Anyhow, the find itself is certainly important. It confirms that this king is not just a literary figure of Rameside times. His existence cannot be  questioned anymore now, as some Egyptologists did and who refused to add him to the list of known pharaoh's.


      I quote a friend of mine: "It's always nice to have additional confirmation that the Egyptians were not simply making stuff up about their predecessors...it appears that
      the inscription was carved on rock [Tura limestone] quarried in Hyksos territory,
      transported to Thebes, so trade / peaceful coexistence (and a longer
      reign for SenakhtenRe than Ryholt et al. assign) seem the order of the
      day." 

      There are still a few unattested predecessors of Sennakhenre though, mentioned in the Turin Canon, so we can await some more discoveries in that direction.


      Regards,
      Ian Onvlee,
      Den Haag, Netherlands.



      ________________________________
      From: Robert McRoberts <mcroberts.robert@...>
      To: "ANE-2@yahoogroups.com" <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, March 6, 2012 4:16 PM
      Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Archaeologists discover name of lost pharaonic king


       
      Ian,

      Thanks for the clarification. I have been hearing different views of this for several days. If I understand correctly what is being stated is that an artifact from this king's reign had been discovered showing his name. Previously the name was only known from artifacts dating to his successor's. So the idea that there needs to be a new name added to the king list is bunkum. Sadly it seems this misconception is tainting an otherwise worthwhile find.

      Robert F. McRoberts
      Suite101 Ancient History Editor

      ________________________________
      From: Ian Onvlee <sambacats@...>
      To: "ANE-2@yahoogroups.com" <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, March 6, 2012 5:35 AM
      Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Archaeologists discover name of lost pharaonic king


       
      <<He belongs to the XVII dinasty. You can read his name in this article:
      http://www.egyptindependent.com/node/694016?>>

      Just to let you all know: The title and the first sentence of this article is a sensationalistic lie. The king Nakht In Re is not a previously unknown king nor a "lost king". He is
      known from a family list of Amosis I as Senakhtenre, the alleged father/predecessor of Sequenenre. So Mohamed Ibrahim Ali should have said that the discovery is no more than a verification of the existence of an already long known early 17th Dynasty King.

      Ian Onvlee
      Den Haag, Netherlands

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    • Michael Brass
      ... There are short film clips of Sir Henry Wellcome s 1911-14 excavations at the famous site Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan, which I am re-examining. The
      Message 62 of 62 , Mar 15, 2012
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        > 1.1. Reflections on the EES Excavations at Amarna
        >    Posted by: "Brian" r.brianroberts@... r.brianroberts
        >    Date: Wed Mar 14, 2012 7:11 am ((PDT))
        >
        > I quite accidentally discovered a set of short videos on Youtube comprised of film shot during the 1930-1933 seasons at Amarna, under the Directorship of John Pendlebury. The first thing that occurred to me was how ahead of his time he was to realize the power of the moving image to enthrall the public back home! And secondly, it may be the first multimedia excavation ever (in their case, printed report and film).
        >
        > Does anyone on the list know if that's true?

        There are short film clips of Sir Henry Wellcome's 1911-14 excavations
        at the famous site Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan, which I am
        re-examining. The clips are available on the Wellcome Trust's website.

        Regards,
        Mike Brass
        University College London
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