Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Santorini Eruption and Chronology: Two New Articles

Expand Messages
  • Paul James Cowie
    Following are details of two articles to be published in the Science tomorrow (Friday 28 April 2006), concerning the ongoing application of evidences
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 27, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Following are details of two articles to be published in the Science
      tomorrow (Friday 28 April 2006), concerning the ongoing application
      of evidences associated with the Theran eruption to the
      reconstruction of east Mediterranean chronologies (the articles are
      already available online).

      Although I have only had time for a cursory reading thus far, it is
      nonetheless possible to predict that these articles will stimulate a
      vigorous level of discussion:

      > Santorini Eruption Radiocarbon Dated to 1627-1600 B.C.
      > Walter L. Friedrich, Bernd Kromer, Michael Friedrich, Jan
      > Heinemeier, Tom Pfeiffer, and Sahra Talamo
      > Science 28 April 2006: 548.
      > A buried olive tree provides a firm early date for the massive
      > Santorini eruption, facilitating correlations among Bronze Age
      > events throughout the Mediterranean.


      > Chronology for the Aegean Late Bronze Age 1700-1400 B.C.
      > Sturt W. Manning, Christopher Bronk Ramsey, Walter Kutschera,
      > Thomas Higham, Bernd Kromer, Peter Steier, and Eva M. Wild
      > Science 28 April 2006: 565-569.
      > Radiocarbon ages from the Aegean region, along with the new age for
      > the Santorini eruption, revise the inferred relations among Minoan,
      > Egyptian, and Near Eastern cultures.

      Trust this of interest,

      -----------------------

      Paul James Cowie
      BA Hons (Sydney) GradDipEd MA (Macquarie) PhD in candidato

      London, England and Sydney, Australia

      Editor, http://www.ancientneareast.net/
      Area Supervisor, Tel Rehov Excavations, Israel

      PhD Candidate, Department of Ancient History and Archaeology, Macquarie
      University, Sydney, Australia



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • driver40386
      Comparison of major events in early Mediterranean cultures in Crete, the Levant, Egypt, and elsewhere during the Bronze Age requires an accurate chronology
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 27, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        "Comparison of major events in early Mediterranean cultures in Crete,
        the Levant, Egypt, and elsewhere during the Bronze Age requires an
        accurate chronology for comparison. One critical tie point is the age
        of the Santorini eruption, which flung ash across the area, but this
        needs to be augmented with longer and better chronologies in each
        locality. Manning et al. (p. 565) present a large number of
        radiocarbon dates spanning 300 years that, along with a more firm
        Santorini age (see the Brevia by Friedrich et al. and the cover),
        shift the Aegean record about 100 years earlier. Thus, the major New
        Palace Crete culture was contemporaneous with one in the Levant, not
        with the New Kingdom period of Egypt as had been inferred."
        http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/312/5773/496g

        Emphasis:
        "...the major New Palace Crete culture was contemporaneous with one in
        the Levant..."

        An interesting shift, certainly controversial.

        Regards, Jon Smyth
      • Graham Hagens
        ... The data in these articles appears to be quite robust. Quite a number of short lived analyses are reported in addition to those from the buried olive tree
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 30, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          > Following are details of two articles to be published in the Science
          >tomorrow (Friday 28 April 2006), concerning the ongoing application
          >of evidences associated with the Theran eruption to the
          >reconstruction of east Mediterranean chronologies (the articles are
          >already available online).

          >Although I have only had time for a cursory reading thus far, it is
          >nonetheless possible to predict that these articles will stimulate a
          >vigorous level of discussion:

          >> Santorini Eruption Radiocarbon Dated to 1627-1600 B.C.
          >> Walter L. Friedrich, Bernd Kromer, Michael Friedrich, Jan
          >> Heinemeier, Tom Pfeiffer, and Sahra Talamo
          >> Science 28 April 2006: 548.
          >> A buried olive tree provides a firm early date for the massive
          >> Santorini eruption, facilitating correlations among Bronze Age
          >> events throughout the Mediterranean.


          >> Chronology for the Aegean Late Bronze Age 1700-1400 B.C.
          >> Sturt W. Manning, Christopher Bronk Ramsey, Walter Kutschera,
          >> Thomas Higham, Bernd Kromer, Peter Steier, and Eva M. Wild
          >> Science 28 April 2006: 565-569.
          >> Radiocarbon ages from the Aegean region, along with the new age for
          >> the Santorini eruption, revise the inferred relations among Minoan,
          >> Egyptian, and Near Eastern cultures.

          The data in these articles appears to be quite robust. Quite a number of
          short lived analyses are reported in addition to those from the buried olive
          tree - actually an olive branch with 72 rings, which Manning et al. managed
          to slice into four segments for analysis. The precision of the data derived
          from this branch seems to be exceptionally high: 1627-1600 (2 sigma, 95.4%)
          or less than 1%. The only concern which came to my mind is how close the
          14-C ybp values are to a very flat portion of the calibration curve between
          ca.1600-1520 BCE. Since the curve used (IntCal 2004) was largely derived
          from Anatolian sequences, it is not impossible that the required for the
          calibration of Aegean data might be slightly different. If so the close
          proximity of the flat portion at the low end of the data range could have a
          significant impact on the calibrated values.

          The authors do not challenge Egyptian chronology, and only speculate that
          there may be a 'possible flaw in linkages with Egypt' which will require
          'reinterpretation of cultural linkages.'

          Graham Hagens
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.