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Racing in the ANE

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  • George Athas
    In the Aegean world, we have evidence of competitive running races from a fairly early period. Is anyone aware of the earliest evidence for the concept of
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 17, 2011
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      In the Aegean world, we have evidence of competitive running races from a fairly early period. Is anyone aware of the earliest evidence for the concept of racing in the Fertile Crescent, especially in the Levant? It need not be restricted to running, but could be any type of racing.

      Thanks in advance


      GEORGE ATHAS
      Director of Postgraduate Studies,
      Moore Theological College (moore.edu.au)
      Sydney, Australia




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • MarcC
      I can t help you with the Levant, but in Sumer racing was associated with Inanna. Shulgi claimed to be a competitive runner. There is an inscribed statue base
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 18, 2011
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        I can't help you with the Levant, but in Sumer racing was associated with Inanna. Shulgi claimed to be a competitive runner. There is an inscribed statue base and several references to racing in the Shulgi hymns (from ETCSL):

        A praise poem of Šulgi (Šulgi B): c.2.4.2.02
        I, the king, am the Land's most excellent fighter against the enemy. I, Šulgi, am respected for my immense bodily strength. I am mighty; nothing resists me; I know no setbacks. My barges on the river do not sink (?) under me (alludes to a proverb (?)); my teams of asses do not collapse under me. Striding forward like my brother and friend, the youth Utu, as if with the legs of a lion, I am the good groom of my dust-making asses that bray like lions roaring. Like that of a stallion, my strength is unwavering during the running-race; I come first in the race, and my knees do not get tired. I am fearless; I dance with joy. My words shall never be forgotten. Praise for me because of my reliable judgments is on everyone's lips.

        The Step Pyramid depicts Djoser running as part of the Heb-sed.

        Marc Cooper
        Missouri State

        --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, George Athas <george.athas@...> wrote:
        >
        > In the Aegean world, we have evidence of competitive running races from a fairly early period. Is anyone aware of the earliest evidence for the concept of racing in the Fertile Crescent, especially in the Levant? It need not be restricted to running, but could be any type of racing.
        >
        > Thanks in advance
        >
        >
        > GEORGE ATHAS
        > Director of Postgraduate Studies,
        > Moore Theological College (moore.edu.au)
        > Sydney, Australia
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • MarcC
        One other thing which might be helpful, the Akkadian verb to race is lasamu, and the word for footrace is lismu. You can check CAD for many references. Marc
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 18, 2011
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          One other thing which might be helpful, the Akkadian verb "to race" is lasamu, and the word for footrace is lismu. You can check CAD for many references.

          Marc Cooper
          Missouri State University

          --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "MarcC" <marc.cooper@...> wrote:
          >
          > I can't help you with the Levant, but in Sumer racing was associated with Inanna. Shulgi claimed to be a competitive runner. There is an inscribed statue base and several references to racing in the Shulgi hymns (from ETCSL):
          >
          > A praise poem of Šulgi (Šulgi B): c.2.4.2.02
          > I, the king, am the Land's most excellent fighter against the enemy. I, Šulgi, am respected for my immense bodily strength. I am mighty; nothing resists me; I know no setbacks. My barges on the river do not sink (?) under me (alludes to a proverb (?)); my teams of asses do not collapse under me. Striding forward like my brother and friend, the youth Utu, as if with the legs of a lion, I am the good groom of my dust-making asses that bray like lions roaring. Like that of a stallion, my strength is unwavering during the running-race; I come first in the race, and my knees do not get tired. I am fearless; I dance with joy. My words shall never be forgotten. Praise for me because of my reliable judgments is on everyone's lips.
          >
          > The Step Pyramid depicts Djoser running as part of the Heb-sed.
          >
          > Marc Cooper
          > Missouri State
          >
          > --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, George Athas <george.athas@> wrote:
          > >
          > > In the Aegean world, we have evidence of competitive running races from a fairly early period. Is anyone aware of the earliest evidence for the concept of racing in the Fertile Crescent, especially in the Levant? It need not be restricted to running, but could be any type of racing.
          > >
          > > Thanks in advance
          > >
          > >
          > > GEORGE ATHAS
          > > Director of Postgraduate Studies,
          > > Moore Theological College (moore.edu.au)
          > > Sydney, Australia
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
        • Robert
          I just came across a new reference that I haven t seen yet but that might be of interest: Nick Fisher and Hans van Wees (eds.), Competition in the ancient
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 2, 2011
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            I just came across a new reference that I haven't seen yet but that might be of interest:

            Nick Fisher and Hans van Wees (eds.), Competition in the ancient world (Swansea: Classical Press of Wales, 2011).

            While "ancient world" usually means classical Greece and Rome, I note a contribution to the volume by Karen Radner, "Fame and prizes: competition and war in the Neo-Assyrian empire," 37-57. so you may find something useful there.

            You can read Radner's contribution online at:

            http://ucl.academia.edu/KarenRadner/Papers/429242/2011_Fame_and_prizes_competition_and_war_in_the_Neo-Assyrian_empire._In_N._Fisher_and_H._van_Wees_ed._Competition_in_the_Ancient_World_Swansea_2011_37-57#

            and you can download it if you are a member.

            Bob Whiting
            whiting@...

            --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, George Athas <george.athas@...> wrote:
            >
            > In the Aegean world, we have evidence of competitive running races from a fairly early period. Is anyone aware of the earliest evidence for the concept of racing in the Fertile Crescent, especially in the Levant? It need not be restricted to running, but could be any type of racing.
            >
            > Thanks in advance
            >
            >
            > GEORGE ATHAS
            > Director of Postgraduate Studies,
            > Moore Theological College (moore.edu.au)
            > Sydney, Australia
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • George Athas
            Much obliged, Bob! GEORGE ATHAS Director of Postgraduate Studies, Moore Theological College (moore.edu.au) Sydney, Australia [Non-text portions of this message
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 2, 2011
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              Much obliged, Bob!


              GEORGE ATHAS
              Director of Postgraduate Studies,
              Moore Theological College (moore.edu.au)
              Sydney, Australia





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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