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JHS - New Article: T. Ganzel, "The Shattered Dream. The Prophecies of Joel: A Bridge between Ezekiel and Haggai?"

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  • ehud
    Dear all, I am glad to announce the publication of the following article in the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures (http://www.jhsonline.org) Journal of Hebrew
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 3, 2011
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      Dear all,



      I am glad to announce the publication of the following article in the
      Journal of Hebrew Scriptures (http://www.jhsonline.org)



      Journal of Hebrew Scriptures - Volume 11: Article 6 (2011)



      Tova Ganzel, "The Shattered Dream. The Prophecies of Joel: A Bridge between
      Ezekiel and Haggai?"



      Abstract:



      Using a linguistic-topical examination, this article suggests that Joel's
      prophecies reflect the historical reality in the land of Israel immediately
      following Cyrus' Declaration (538 BCE); namely, the early days of the
      restoration period, preceding the building of the Temple, and perhaps even
      of the altar. From this perspective Joel fills the lacuna in prophetic
      literature between Ezekiel, whose latest prophecies date to c. 570 BCE, and
      Haggai and Zechariah, whose earliest prophecies date to the second year of
      Darius' reign, 520 BCE.



      To access the article directly please go to
      http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/JHS/Articles/article_153.pdf



      Regards



      Ehud

      -----

      The printed version of volume 9 (2009) has been published. For information
      please go to

      http://www.gorgiaspress.com/bookshop/showproduct.aspx?ISBN=978-1-61143-004-2

      For information about the printed version of volume 8 (2008) please go to
      http://www.gorgiaspress.com/BOOKSHOP/pc-56678-10-ben-zvi-ehud-perspectives-o
      n-hebrew-scriptures-v.aspx



      For information about the other printed volumes of the journal, please go
      to:

      http://www.gorgiaspress.com/BOOKSHOP/pc-56678-10-ben-zvi-ehud-perspectives-o
      n-hebrew-scriptures-v.aspx



      The Logos version of vol. 8 has been released. For information please go to
      http://www.logos.com/product/8765/journal-of-hebrew-scriptures-vol-8. For
      information about the Logos version of vols. 1-7, please go to
      http://www.logos.com/products/details/4336.



      The Logos version of volume 9 of the journal is being prepared.



      Ehud Ben Zvi
      History and Classics

      University of Alberta
      2-28 HM Tory Building
      Edmonton AB Canada T6G 2H4



      ** This communication is intended for the use of the recipient to whom it is
      addressed, and may contain confidential, personal, and/or privileged
      information. Please contact me immediately if you are not the intended
      recipient of this communication, and do not copy, distribute, or take action
      relying on it. Any communication received in error, or subsequent reply,
      should be deleted or destroyed.**





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Robert Deutsch
      Dear List Members I am glad to announce the publication of the following book: Biblical Period Epigraphy; The Josef Chaim Kaufman Collection; Seals, Bullae,
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 4, 2011
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        Dear List Members

        I am glad to announce the publication of the following book:

        Biblical Period Epigraphy; The Josef Chaim
        Kaufman Collection; Seals, Bullae, Handles.
        by Robert Deutsch

        From the Foreword
        The book is the second volume recording biblical
        period epigraphic material from the Josef Chaim
        Kaufman collection. The first volume published by
        the author: “Biblical Period Hebrew Bullae”,
        printed in Jerusalem in 2003, consists of 516
        bullae and two seals. The present volume includes
        387 specimens: 88 seals, 248 bullae and 51 stamped handles.
        Out of the 88 seals: 84 are Hebrew, one is
        anepigraphic (Judean), one is Hebrew Phoenician,
        one is Hebrew Aramaic and one is Moabite. Six
        seals were previously published and 82 seals are
        presented for the first time. The Hebrew seals,
        including a Moabite example, are to be dated to
        the end of the 8th century B.C.E., through the
        beginning of the 6th century B.C.E., before the
        destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar II in
        586 B.C.E., while the Hebrew Phoenician and the
        Aramaic seals are dated to the post exilic period
        in the 5th century B.C.E. The seal collection was
        formed during the last four decades, since 1967,
        purchased one by one from licensed antiquity dealers, mainly in Jerusalem.
        The 248 bullae are all Hebrew except for three
        anepigraphic and two Hellenistic. They were
        impressed by 231 different seals and there are 17
        duplicates. The Hebrew bullae are to be dated
        also to the end of the 8th – through the
        beginning of the 6th century B.C.E. All are
        previously unrecorded. Their possible provenance
        is Khirbet Qe’ila, biblical Keilah (Josh. 15:44),
        located 13.5 Km. north-west of Hebron.
        Out of the 51 handles, seven are of the lmlk
        type, impressed by seven different seals. The
        majority, 42 handles, are impressed by 33
        different official seals with nine duplicates.
        They are to be dated to the end of the eighth
        century, before 701 B.C.E., in the time of
        Hezekiah king of Judah. The two remaining handles are from the Persian Period.
        The question of authenticity has been addressed
        in the first volume, nevertheless, some
        additional remarks can be added. All the items
        presented in this volume were meticulously
        examined by the author and were found genuine beyond any doubt.
        The recent tendency expressed by some scholars,
        to declare all unprovenanced epigraphic materials
        “questionable” and therefore worthless, is an
        approach which is to be unequivocally rejected.
        Such an attitude is rather destructive instead to
        adopt a constructive approach. The corpus of west
        Semitic epigraphic material unearthed in
        controlled excavations is significantly smaller
        than that from unprovenanced sources. Avoiding
        most of the historical information just because
        the material was found by non professional plunders is inconceivable.
        A proper analogously are the Dead Sea Scrolls
        which were looted by local Bedouins. Today, no
        scientific biblical research can be even imagined
        without them. The same is valid concerning the
        14th century B.C.E. el-Amarna cuneiform letters.
        The majority of the clay tablets were found by
        farmers on the east bank of the Nile, about 300
        Km. south of Cairo and only a minority were
        uncovered by archaeologists. The letters, which
        are part of the diplomatic correspondence between
        the Egyptian royal court and the Canaanite
        city-kings, are records revealing invaluable
        historical information unknown from other
        sources. Such documents can not be ignored simply
        because were not found in methodological excavations.

        The importance of this volume is self-evident and
        is to be considered as a rescue publications. Its
        permanent value will increase as time will pass
        and will serve as valuable reference book.

        Jerusalem, 2011
        ISBN 9657162173
        Hardcover, 317 pages
        All the pictures are in color

        Price: $ 120

        You can order it from the publisher: mail@...
        or from <http://www.eisenbrauns.com/item/DEUPERIOD>Eisenbrauns

        Regards

        Robert Deutsch



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Peter T. Daniels
        Why is material like the following permitted to be posted on ANE List? Even I, coming from a peripheral field of study, can identify the fallacies in the
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 4, 2011
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          Why is material like the following permitted to be posted on ANE List?

          Even I, coming from a peripheral field of study, can identify the fallacies in
          the "argument."

          My comments interpolated in [ ].
          ________________________________
          From: Robert Deutsch <rd@...>
          To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, April 4, 2011 9:28:32 AM
          Subject: [ANE-2] Re: New publication

          [Setting aside the account of the specific materials presented in this volume]
           
          All the items
          presented in this volume were meticulously
          examined by the author and were found genuine beyond any doubt.

          [Regardless of any qualifications the author may or may not have for making such
          a judgment, the simple fact that he stands to gain financially from the success
          of this publication (quite aside from whether he may have profited from the sale
          of any of them into the collection being described) renders him an interested
          party and thus utterly disqualified from making such a judgment the sole
          authority for their legitimization.]

          The recent tendency expressed by some scholars,
          to declare all unprovenanced epigraphic materials
          “questionable” and therefore worthless, is an
          approach which is to be unequivocally rejected.
          Such an attitude is rather destructive instead to
          adopt a constructive approach. The corpus of west
          Semitic epigraphic material unearthed in
          controlled excavations is significantly smaller
          than that from unprovenanced sources. Avoiding
          most of the historical information just because
          the material was found by non professional plunders

          [There is no such thing as a "professional plunder[er]."]

          is inconceivable.
          A proper analogously are the Dead Sea Scrolls
          which were looted by local Bedouins.

          [The DSS are not _in the slightest_ "analogous," whether "properly" or not. It
          would be absurd to imagine a forger forging items utterly unlike any items ever
          before found. (Moreover, the bulk of the DSS materials did not come from Bedouin
          loot.)]

          Today, no
          scientific biblical research can be even imagined
          without them. The same is valid concerning the
          14th century B.C.E. el-Amarna cuneiform letters.
          The majority of the clay tablets were found by
          farmers on the east bank of the Nile, about 300
          Km. south of Cairo and only a minority were
          uncovered by archaeologists.

          [The Amarna tablets are not _in the slightest_ "the same." It is inconceivable
          that a forger could have either composed the texts as they stand, or suggested
          that they had come from an archive in Egypt.]

          The letters, which
          are part of the diplomatic correspondence between
          the Egyptian royal court and the Canaanite
          city-kings, are records revealing invaluable
          historical information unknown from other
          sources. Such documents can not be ignored simply
          because were not found in methodological excavations.

          [When they were found, there was no market for either turn-of-the-era biblical
          documents or ancient cuneiform tablets from Egypt. Today, however, the world
          seems to be filled with gullible "collectors" who will pay any price for
          artifacts that they are assured will bring them into contact with times and
          places that are of spiritual significance to them.

          [On a similar note, there's a little museum in Downpatrick, Ireland, with (when
          I saw it in 1992) a case of "cuneiform tablets" brought home by World War I
          soldiers who had purchased them during the Near Eastern campaign, and donated by
          their families. A cursory glance showed that they are nothing of the sort, but
          the purchasers wanted to believe that they could get such a thing. The situation
          is no different today, except that the manufacturers are more sophisticated.]

          The importance of this volume is self-evident and
          is to be considered as a rescue publications. Its
          permanent value will increase as time will pass
          and will serve as valuable reference book.

          Jerusalem, 2011
          ISBN 9657162173
          Hardcover, 317 pages
          All the pictures are in color

          Price: $ 120

          [Indeed. $120. If the work were published by a commercial publisher, the author
          would stand to receive $12 per copy sold at that price. Since no publisher is
          identified, it must be assumed that it is privately published, in which case the
          author stands to receive however much of the entire purchase price does not pay
          for the manufacture of the book.]
           --
          Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
          Jersey City
        • Niels Peter Lemche
          Peter, you are right on one thing: If you take a look of the publisher http://www.archaeological-center.com/ you find ... Robert Deutsch. Otherwise it is about
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 4, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Peter, you are right on one thing: If you take a look of the publisher http://www.archaeological-center.com/ you find ... Robert Deutsch.

            Otherwise it is about an argument of pressing importance, because these archaologists mentioned (such as David Ussishkin) simply says that this is the only way to stop forgerers: not to accept anything of uncertain origins.

            Examples from say the time until 1950 are different. Forgerers did not dispose of the techhniques of today, and it is quite easy to expose most forgeries (although well-established scholars have been cheated by, e.g., the Paraiba inscription).

            However, it is also an announcement of a book in the field and therefore falls within the accepted rules of ANE-2.

            Niels Peter Lemche



            -----Oprindelig meddelelse-----
            Fra: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] På vegne af Peter T. Daniels
            Sendt: den 4 april 2011 15:53
            Til: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
            Emne: Re: [ANE-2] Re: New publication

            Why is material like the following permitted to be posted on ANE List?

            Even I, coming from a peripheral field of study, can identify the fallacies in
            the "argument."

            My comments interpolated in [ ].
            ________________________________
            From: Robert Deutsch <rd@...>
            To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Mon, April 4, 2011 9:28:32 AM
            Subject: [ANE-2] Re: New publication

            [Setting aside the account of the specific materials presented in this volume]
             
            All the items
            presented in this volume were meticulously
            examined by the author and were found genuine beyond any doubt.

            [Regardless of any qualifications the author may or may not have for making such
            a judgment, the simple fact that he stands to gain financially from the success
            of this publication (quite aside from whether he may have profited from the sale
            of any of them into the collection being described) renders him an interested
            party and thus utterly disqualified from making such a judgment the sole
            authority for their legitimization.]

            The recent tendency expressed by some scholars,
            to declare all unprovenanced epigraphic materials
            “questionable” and therefore worthless, is an
            approach which is to be unequivocally rejected.
            Such an attitude is rather destructive instead to
            adopt a constructive approach. The corpus of west
            Semitic epigraphic material unearthed in
            controlled excavations is significantly smaller
            than that from unprovenanced sources. Avoiding
            most of the historical information just because
            the material was found by non professional plunders

            [There is no such thing as a "professional plunder[er]."]

            is inconceivable.
            A proper analogously are the Dead Sea Scrolls
            which were looted by local Bedouins.

            [The DSS are not _in the slightest_ "analogous," whether "properly" or not. It
            would be absurd to imagine a forger forging items utterly unlike any items ever
            before found. (Moreover, the bulk of the DSS materials did not come from Bedouin
            loot.)]

            Today, no
            scientific biblical research can be even imagined
            without them. The same is valid concerning the
            14th century B.C.E. el-Amarna cuneiform letters.
            The majority of the clay tablets were found by
            farmers on the east bank of the Nile, about 300
            Km. south of Cairo and only a minority were
            uncovered by archaeologists.

            [The Amarna tablets are not _in the slightest_ "the same." It is inconceivable
            that a forger could have either composed the texts as they stand, or suggested
            that they had come from an archive in Egypt.]

            The letters, which
            are part of the diplomatic correspondence between
            the Egyptian royal court and the Canaanite
            city-kings, are records revealing invaluable
            historical information unknown from other
            sources. Such documents can not be ignored simply
            because were not found in methodological excavations.

            [When they were found, there was no market for either turn-of-the-era biblical
            documents or ancient cuneiform tablets from Egypt. Today, however, the world
            seems to be filled with gullible "collectors" who will pay any price for
            artifacts that they are assured will bring them into contact with times and
            places that are of spiritual significance to them.

            [On a similar note, there's a little museum in Downpatrick, Ireland, with (when
            I saw it in 1992) a case of "cuneiform tablets" brought home by World War I
            soldiers who had purchased them during the Near Eastern campaign, and donated by
            their families. A cursory glance showed that they are nothing of the sort, but
            the purchasers wanted to believe that they could get such a thing. The situation
            is no different today, except that the manufacturers are more sophisticated.]

            The importance of this volume is self-evident and
            is to be considered as a rescue publications. Its
            permanent value will increase as time will pass
            and will serve as valuable reference book.

            Jerusalem, 2011
            ISBN 9657162173
            Hardcover, 317 pages
            All the pictures are in color

            Price: $ 120

            [Indeed. $120. If the work were published by a commercial publisher, the author
            would stand to receive $12 per copy sold at that price. Since no publisher is
            identified, it must be assumed that it is privately published, in which case the
            author stands to receive however much of the entire purchase price does not pay
            for the manufacture of the book.]
             --
            Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
            Jersey City


            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Peter T. Daniels
            Not long ago, B. Porten spoke on the results of statistical analysis of the hundreds of looted Aramaic ostraca that have recently been published on behalf of
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 4, 2011
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              Not long ago, B. Porten spoke on the results of statistical analysis of the
              hundreds of looted Aramaic ostraca that have recently been published on behalf
              of the collectors who encouraged the destruction of their context. (Their
              content is so dull, and inscrutable except in the aggregate, that it's virtually
              impossible they are forgeries.) How much more they could tell us if their
              finders had taken the (Jordanian? Palestinian?) archeological authorities to
              their findspot for controlled excavation and, say, received a legitimate
              "finders' fee" for their service.

              How is this different from the arguments that have, for the moment, given a
              legal reprieve to the Persepolis tablets in Chicago?

              (He also notes that epigraphers like Lemaire and Naveh, not having had access to
              the corpus as a whole, make significant reading errors, but that's a different
              matter.)
               --
              Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
              Jersey City


              >
              >From: Niels Peter Lemche <npl@...>
              >To: "ANE-2@yahoogroups.com" <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
              >Sent: Mon, April 4, 2011 12:54:09 PM
              >Subject: SV: [ANE-2] Re: New publication
              >

              >Peter, you are right on one thing: If you take a look of the publisher
              >http://www.archaeological-center.com/ you find ... Robert Deutsch.
              >
              >
              >Otherwise it is about an argument of pressing importance, because these
              >archaologists mentioned (such as David Ussishkin) simply says that this is the
              >only way to stop forgerers: not to accept anything of uncertain origins.
              >
              >
              >Examples from say the time until 1950 are different. Forgerers did not dispose
              >of the techhniques of today, and it is quite easy to expose most forgeries
              >(although well-established scholars have been cheated by, e.g., the Paraiba
              >inscription).
              >
              >
              >However, it is also an announcement of a book in the field and therefore falls
              >within the accepted rules of ANE-2.
              >
              >
              >Niels Peter Lemche
              >
              >
              >
              >-----Oprindelig meddelelse-----
              >Fra: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] På vegne af Peter T.
              >Daniels
              >
              >Sendt: den 4 april 2011 15:53
              >Til: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
              >Emne: Re: [ANE-2] Re: New publication
              >
              >Why is material like the following permitted to be posted on ANE List?
              >
              >Even I, coming from a peripheral field of study, can identify the fallacies in
              >the "argument."
              >
              >My comments interpolated in [ ].
              >________________________________
              >From: Robert Deutsch <rd@...>
              >To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
              >Sent: Mon, April 4, 2011 9:28:32 AM
              >Subject: [ANE-2] Re: New publication
              >
              >[Setting aside the account of the specific materials presented in this volume]

              >All the items
              >presented in this volume were meticulously
              >examined by the author and were found genuine beyond any doubt.
              >
              >[Regardless of any qualifications the author may or may not have for making such
              >
              >a judgment, the simple fact that he stands to gain financially from the success

              >of this publication (quite aside from whether he may have profited from the sale
              >
              >of any of them into the collection being described) renders him an interested
              >party and thus utterly disqualified from making such a judgment the sole
              >authority for their legitimization.]
              >
              >The recent tendency expressed by some scholars,
              >to declare all unprovenanced epigraphic materials
              >“questionable” and therefore worthless, is an
              >approach which is to be unequivocally rejected.
              >Such an attitude is rather destructive instead to
              >adopt a constructive approach. The corpus of west
              >Semitic epigraphic material unearthed in
              >controlled excavations is significantly smaller
              >than that from unprovenanced sources. Avoiding
              >most of the historical information just because
              >the material was found by non professional plunders
              >
              >[There is no such thing as a "professional plunder[er]."]
              >
              >is inconceivable.
              >A proper analogously are the Dead Sea Scrolls
              >which were looted by local Bedouins.
              >
              >[The DSS are not _in the slightest_ "analogous," whether "properly" or not. It
              >would be absurd to imagine a forger forging items utterly unlike any items ever

              >before found. (Moreover, the bulk of the DSS materials did not come from Bedouin
              >
              >loot.)]
              >
              >Today, no
              >scientific biblical research can be even imagined
              >without them. The same is valid concerning the
              >14th century B.C.E. el-Amarna cuneiform letters.
              >The majority of the clay tablets were found by
              >farmers on the east bank of the Nile, about 300
              >Km. south of Cairo and only a minority were
              >uncovered by archaeologists.
              >
              >[The Amarna tablets are not _in the slightest_ "the same." It is inconceivable
              >that a forger could have either composed the texts as they stand, or suggested
              >that they had come from an archive in Egypt.]
              >
              >The letters, which
              >are part of the diplomatic correspondence between
              >the Egyptian royal court and the Canaanite
              >city-kings, are records revealing invaluable
              >historical information unknown from other
              >sources. Such documents can not be ignored simply
              >because were not found in methodological excavations.
              >
              >[When they were found, there was no market for either turn-of-the-era biblical
              >documents or ancient cuneiform tablets from Egypt. Today, however, the world
              >seems to be filled with gullible "collectors" who will pay any price for
              >artifacts that they are assured will bring them into contact with times and
              >places that are of spiritual significance to them.
              >
              >[On a similar note, there's a little museum in Downpatrick, Ireland, with (when

              >I saw it in 1992) a case of "cuneiform tablets" brought home by World War I
              >soldiers who had purchased them during the Near Eastern campaign, and donated by
              >
              >their families. A cursory glance showed that they are nothing of the sort, but
              >the purchasers wanted to believe that they could get such a thing. The situation
              >
              >is no different today, except that the manufacturers are more sophisticated.]
              >
              >The importance of this volume is self-evident and
              >is to be considered as a rescue publications. Its
              >permanent value will increase as time will pass
              >and will serve as valuable reference book.
              >
              >Jerusalem, 2011
              >ISBN 9657162173
              >Hardcover, 317 pages
              >All the pictures are in color
              >
              >Price: $ 120
              >
              >[Indeed. $120. If the work were published by a commercial publisher, the author

              >would stand to receive $12 per copy sold at that price. Since no publisher is
              >identified, it must be assumed that it is privately published, in which case the
              >
              >author stands to receive however much of the entire purchase price does not pay

              >for the manufacture of the book.]
              > --
              >Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
              >Jersey City
              >
              >
              >------------------------------------
              >
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • a8oct@btopenworld.com
              ... Is it not just possible that the sightings you refer to are from people who have acquired some of the find? The JAA had apparently seen some examples and
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 5, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Robert Deutsch <rd@...> wrote:
                >
                > This is ridiculous and embarrassing how serious "experts" are
                > considering the authenticity of such foolish fakes.
                > The antiquities dealers in Israel are bombarded in the last 15 years
                > with such "booklets", which are poured from Jordan,
                > west of the land of Ali Baba. Yes, The Ali Baba Codices.
                >
                > Robert Deutsch
                > Tel Aviv
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                Is it not just possible that the sightings you refer to are from people who have 'acquired' some of the find? The JAA had apparently seen some examples and thought them fakes, but no-one did any serious testing of them. Since then extensive metallurgical tests have been performed by Oxford Materials Laboratory and elsewhere and the opinion of Dr Peter Northover is that they were not modern castings. Several professors, who have studied examples, have said they think they are genuine. How do you explain reports that the Director of Jordan's Department of Antiquities, Ziad al-Saad, now thinks they are genuine and wants them back? If they are so prolific in the market place, has Robert Deutsch seen any examples? Does he know of any actual dealers who have seen them? If so when and where? How did he or they know what he or they saw were fakes or genuine?
                Robert Feather, London
              • Robert Deutsch
                This is ridiculous and embarrassing how serious experts are considering the authenticity of such foolish fakes. The antiquities dealers in Israel are
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 5, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  This is ridiculous and embarrassing how serious "experts" are
                  considering the authenticity of such foolish fakes.
                  The antiquities dealers in Israel are bombarded in the last 15 years
                  with such "booklets", which are poured from Jordan,
                  west of the land of Ali Baba. Yes, The Ali Baba Codices.

                  Robert Deutsch
                  Tel Aviv

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Robert
                  Dear Mr. Feather I saw at least 15 such chimeras I will give a short description of some highlights from the iconography depicted on several codices for the
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 5, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Dear Mr. Feather

                    I saw at least 15 such chimeras

                    I will give a short description of some highlights from the iconography depicted on several "codices" for the "scholars" which are not familiar with numismatics.

                    On a single leaf one can find: the head of Alexander the great copied,
                    or impressed from a coin of his general Lysimachos, a palm tree from the coins of Bar Kokhba and Cartage, the eight pointed stars from the Jewish coins of Alexander Yannay and Hellenistic coins of the Seleucus, the bust of Domitianus from the administration coins minted in Judaea, The "inscriptions" are copied from the Hasmonean and Bar Kokhba coins, inscribed in straight and mirror shape, not to mention Gibberish in greek.

                    Some of the leafs are impressed by a mechanical device and some made by hand, All are sealed with nails, some made of iron.

                    No patina or corrosion is detected on them, but only an artificial brown color. An expert who is familiar with lead rust doesn't need more than 10 seconds with a magnifying glass to find out the fraud.

                    Let me end with a comment I made a short time ago on Jim West's Web site:
                    "Scholars are contaminating their academic records with lead poison".

                    What can I add - the name of Jesus was called in vain.

                    Robert Deutsch
                    Herzliah



                    --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "a8oct@..." <a8oct@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Robert Deutsch <rd@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > This is ridiculous and embarrassing how serious "experts" are
                    > > considering the authenticity of such foolish fakes.
                    > > The antiquities dealers in Israel are bombarded in the last 15 years
                    > > with such "booklets", which are poured from Jordan,
                    > > west of the land of Ali Baba. Yes, The Ali Baba Codices.
                    > >
                    > > Robert Deutsch
                    > > Tel Aviv
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > Is it not just possible that the sightings you refer to are from people who have 'acquired' some of the find? The JAA had apparently seen some examples and thought them fakes, but no-one did any serious testing of them. Since then extensive metallurgical tests have been performed by Oxford Materials Laboratory and elsewhere and the opinion of Dr Peter Northover is that they were not modern castings. Several professors, who have studied examples, have said they think they are genuine. How do you explain reports that the Director of Jordan's Department of Antiquities, Ziad al-Saad, now thinks they are genuine and wants them back? If they are so prolific in the market place, has Robert Deutsch seen any examples? Does he know of any actual dealers who have seen them? If so when and where? How did he or they know what he or they saw were fakes or genuine?
                    > Robert Feather, London
                    >
                  • a8oct@btopenworld.com
                    Dear Mr Deutsch, I appreciate your response. I assume your chimeras are not fire-eating female monsters, but was more interested in where you saw examples of
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 6, 2011
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                      Dear Mr Deutsch,
                      I appreciate your response. I assume your 'chimeras' are not fire-eating female monsters, but was more interested in where you saw examples of the Lead Codices and more specific names of dealers and when you saw them.


                      You are an acknowledged world expert on inscriptions and bullae and I agree absolutely that many of the images on the codices are taken from coins and extant imagery from the Hellenistic to 2nd Temple period and beyond to the 2nd century CE. Interestingly no coin impressions after the Bar Kochbar period are seen.

                      My expertise is in metallurgy and whilst some of the material shows little sign of corrosion, others I have personally examined definitely do.

                      I am mindful that I have expressed the view that some of the materials that I have had a chance to examine are probably genuine. The flip side of that is that some I have seen could well be items that have entered the collection and not come from the cave source. Other items I have not seen, but only been told about or seen photographs of, I obviously cannot certify as genuine.

                      The two books I have studied in the laboratory and had Mass Spectrometry testing performed on, are in my opinion and the opinion of Dr Peter Northover, Head of Oxford Materials Laboratory, of very old provenance and not modern remelted material. Visually the corrosion products on these two books are strongly indicative of aging that has taken place over a long period. My position has always been cautious, saying much more work needed to be done to know what the codices were saying and to verify their possible authenticity.

                      As to the presence of Jesus and possible images of Him, this, of course, is wild speculation, and I have never made such a suggestion. This is all journalistic exploitation for Easter!

                      If some of the material is authentic, in my view, it relates to the 2nd century CE and Jewish activities - perhaps related to Bar Kochbar.

                      Robert Feather, London


                      --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rd@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Dear Mr. Feather
                      >
                      > I saw at least 15 such chimeras
                      >
                      > I will give a short description of some highlights from the iconography depicted on several "codices" for the "scholars" which are not familiar with numismatics.
                      >
                      > On a single leaf one can find: the head of Alexander the great copied,
                      > or impressed from a coin of his general Lysimachos, a palm tree from the coins of Bar Kokhba and Cartage, the eight pointed stars from the Jewish coins of Alexander Yannay and Hellenistic coins of the Seleucus, the bust of Domitianus from the administration coins minted in Judaea, The "inscriptions" are copied from the Hasmonean and Bar Kokhba coins, inscribed in straight and mirror shape, not to mention Gibberish in greek.
                      >
                      > Some of the leafs are impressed by a mechanical device and some made by hand, All are sealed with nails, some made of iron.
                      >
                      > No patina or corrosion is detected on them, but only an artificial brown color. An expert who is familiar with lead rust doesn't need more than 10 seconds with a magnifying glass to find out the fraud.
                      >
                      > Let me end with a comment I made a short time ago on Jim West's Web site:
                      > "Scholars are contaminating their academic records with lead poison".
                      >
                      > What can I add - the name of Jesus was called in vain.
                      >
                      > Robert Deutsch
                      > Herzliah
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "a8oct@" <a8oct@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Robert Deutsch <rd@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > This is ridiculous and embarrassing how serious "experts" are
                      > > > considering the authenticity of such foolish fakes.
                      > > > The antiquities dealers in Israel are bombarded in the last 15 years
                      > > > with such "booklets", which are poured from Jordan,
                      > > > west of the land of Ali Baba. Yes, The Ali Baba Codices.
                      > > >
                      > > > Robert Deutsch
                      > > > Tel Aviv
                      > > >
                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > > Is it not just possible that the sightings you refer to are from people who have 'acquired' some of the find? The JAA had apparently seen some examples and thought them fakes, but no-one did any serious testing of them. Since then extensive metallurgical tests have been performed by Oxford Materials Laboratory and elsewhere and the opinion of Dr Peter Northover is that they were not modern castings. Several professors, who have studied examples, have said they think they are genuine. How do you explain reports that the Director of Jordan's Department of Antiquities, Ziad al-Saad, now thinks they are genuine and wants them back? If they are so prolific in the market place, has Robert Deutsch seen any examples? Does he know of any actual dealers who have seen them? If so when and where? How did he or they know what he or they saw were fakes or genuine?
                      > > Robert Feather, London
                      > >
                      >
                    • tom_verenna
                      At this point we have to accept that, based on just prima facie evidence (pictures provided by the media and so forth), that the images we are supplied with
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 6, 2011
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                        At this point we have to accept that, based on just prima facie evidence
                        (pictures provided by the media and so forth), that the images we are
                        supplied with are indeed fakes. I don't know who stated these were
                        'genuine' but I can tell you it was not Philip. And I know that
                        Margaret has not seen the tablets first hand (she has said as much
                        herself) and both her and Philip had not been told that the one tablet
                        which has been verified as part of the collection was indeed modern.

                        The evidence is so strong at present that the tablets we have seen are
                        fakes that I suspect when the other tablets are 'released' in whatever
                        money-making scheme Elkington has in store, they will be discovered as
                        modern as well.

                        Tom Verenna, Philadelphia

                        --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rd@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Dear Mr. Feather
                        >
                        > I saw at least 15 such chimeras
                        >
                        > I will give a short description of some highlights from the
                        iconography depicted on several "codices" for the "scholars" which are
                        not familiar with numismatics.
                        >
                        > On a single leaf one can find: the head of Alexander the great copied,
                        > or impressed from a coin of his general Lysimachos, a palm tree from
                        the coins of Bar Kokhba and Cartage, the eight pointed stars from the
                        Jewish coins of Alexander Yannay and Hellenistic coins of the Seleucus,
                        the bust of Domitianus from the administration coins minted in Judaea,
                        The "inscriptions" are copied from the Hasmonean and Bar Kokhba coins,
                        inscribed in straight and mirror shape, not to mention Gibberish in
                        greek.
                        >
                        > Some of the leafs are impressed by a mechanical device and some made
                        by hand, All are sealed with nails, some made of iron.
                        >
                        > No patina or corrosion is detected on them, but only an artificial
                        brown color. An expert who is familiar with lead rust doesn't need more
                        than 10 seconds with a magnifying glass to find out the fraud.
                        >
                        > Let me end with a comment I made a short time ago on Jim West's Web
                        site:
                        > "Scholars are contaminating their academic records with lead poison".
                        >
                        > What can I add - the name of Jesus was called in vain.
                        >
                        > Robert Deutsch
                        > Herzliah
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "a8oct@" a8oct@ wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Robert Deutsch <rd@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > This is ridiculous and embarrassing how serious "experts" are
                        > > > considering the authenticity of such foolish fakes.
                        > > > The antiquities dealers in Israel are bombarded in the last 15
                        years
                        > > > with such "booklets", which are poured from Jordan,
                        > > > west of the land of Ali Baba. Yes, The Ali Baba Codices.
                        > > >
                        > > > Robert Deutsch
                        > > > Tel Aviv
                        > > >
                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > >
                        > > Is it not just possible that the sightings you refer to are from
                        people who have 'acquired' some of the find? The JAA had apparently seen
                        some examples and thought them fakes, but no-one did any serious testing
                        of them. Since then extensive metallurgical tests have been performed
                        by Oxford Materials Laboratory and elsewhere and the opinion of Dr Peter
                        Northover is that they were not modern castings. Several professors, who
                        have studied examples, have said they think they are genuine. How do you
                        explain reports that the Director of Jordan's Department of Antiquities,
                        Ziad al-Saad, now thinks they are genuine and wants them back? If they
                        are so prolific in the market place, has Robert Deutsch seen any
                        examples? Does he know of any actual dealers who have seen them? If so
                        when and where? How did he or they know what he or they saw were fakes
                        or genuine?
                        > > Robert Feather, London
                        > >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Joe Zias
                        They are of such poor quality I m surprised that anyone bought the story. On the other hand it s always the biblical acholars who fall for this stuff as dirt
                        Message 11 of 11 , Apr 6, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          They are of such poor quality I'm surprised that anyone bought the story. On the other hand it's always the biblical acholars who fall for this stuff as dirt archaeologists, museum curators, dealers can usually spot these items as forgeries a mile away. Moreover, look at the names of those involved, at times it's a dead giveaway.

                          Joe

                          Joe Zias www.joezias.com
                          Anthropology/Paleopathology

                          Science and Antiquity Group - Jerusalem
                          Jerusalem, Israel

                          --- On Wed, 4/6/11, tom_verenna <tsverenna@...> wrote:

                          From: tom_verenna <tsverenna@...>
                          Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Lead Codice
                          To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Wednesday, April 6, 2011, 8:24 AM







                           









                          At this point we have to accept that, based on just prima facie evidence

                          (pictures provided by the media and so forth), that the images we are

                          supplied with are indeed fakes. I don't know who stated these were

                          'genuine' but I can tell you it was not Philip. And I know that

                          Margaret has not seen the tablets first hand (she has said as much

                          herself) and both her and Philip had not been told that the one tablet

                          which has been verified as part of the collection was indeed modern.



                          The evidence is so strong at present that the tablets we have seen are

                          fakes that I suspect when the other tablets are 'released' in whatever

                          money-making scheme Elkington has in store, they will be discovered as

                          modern as well.



                          Tom Verenna, Philadelphia



                          --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rd@...> wrote:

                          >

                          > Dear Mr. Feather

                          >

                          > I saw at least 15 such chimeras

                          >

                          > I will give a short description of some highlights from the

                          iconography depicted on several "codices" for the "scholars" which are

                          not familiar with numismatics.

                          >

                          > On a single leaf one can find: the head of Alexander the great copied,

                          > or impressed from a coin of his general Lysimachos, a palm tree from

                          the coins of Bar Kokhba and Cartage, the eight pointed stars from the

                          Jewish coins of Alexander Yannay and Hellenistic coins of the Seleucus,

                          the bust of Domitianus from the administration coins minted in Judaea,

                          The "inscriptions" are copied from the Hasmonean and Bar Kokhba coins,

                          inscribed in straight and mirror shape, not to mention Gibberish in

                          greek.

                          >

                          > Some of the leafs are impressed by a mechanical device and some made

                          by hand, All are sealed with nails, some made of iron.

                          >

                          > No patina or corrosion is detected on them, but only an artificial

                          brown color. An expert who is familiar with lead rust doesn't need more

                          than 10 seconds with a magnifying glass to find out the fraud.

                          >

                          > Let me end with a comment I made a short time ago on Jim West's Web

                          site:

                          > "Scholars are contaminating their academic records with lead poison".

                          >

                          > What can I add - the name of Jesus was called in vain.

                          >

                          > Robert Deutsch

                          > Herzliah

                          >

                          >

                          >

                          > --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, "a8oct@" a8oct@ wrote:

                          > >

                          > >

                          > >

                          > > --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Robert Deutsch <rd@> wrote:

                          > > >

                          > > > This is ridiculous and embarrassing how serious "experts" are

                          > > > considering the authenticity of such foolish fakes.

                          > > > The antiquities dealers in Israel are bombarded in the last 15

                          years

                          > > > with such "booklets", which are poured from Jordan,

                          > > > west of the land of Ali Baba. Yes, The Ali Baba Codices.

                          > > >

                          > > > Robert Deutsch

                          > > > Tel Aviv

                          > > >

                          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          > > >

                          > > Is it not just possible that the sightings you refer to are from

                          people who have 'acquired' some of the find? The JAA had apparently seen

                          some examples and thought them fakes, but no-one did any serious testing

                          of them. Since then extensive metallurgical tests have been performed

                          by Oxford Materials Laboratory and elsewhere and the opinion of Dr Peter

                          Northover is that they were not modern castings. Several professors, who

                          have studied examples, have said they think they are genuine. How do you

                          explain reports that the Director of Jordan's Department of Antiquities,

                          Ziad al-Saad, now thinks they are genuine and wants them back? If they

                          are so prolific in the market place, has Robert Deutsch seen any

                          examples? Does he know of any actual dealers who have seen them? If so

                          when and where? How did he or they know what he or they saw were fakes

                          or genuine?

                          > > Robert Feather, London

                          > >

                          >



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