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Re: [ANE-2] A New Year's Question: "suffix pronoun" vs "pronominal suffix"

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  • Peter T. Daniels
    Actually, in Latin grammar the substantive and the adjective are the two kinds of noun.  -- Peter T. Daniels grammatim@verizon.net Jersey City
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 2, 2011
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      Actually, in Latin grammar the substantive and the adjective are the two kinds
      of noun.
       --
      Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
      Jersey City




      ________________________________
      From: Robert M Whiting <whiting@...>
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sun, January 2, 2011 12:30:50 PM
      Subject: Re: [ANE-2] A New Year's Question: "suffix pronoun" vs "pronominal
      suffix"

       
      On Sat, 1 Jan 2011, Douglas Petrovich wrote:

      > Technically speaking, "suffix pronoun" features two nouns, and thus is
      > grammatically incorrect in English.

      No, this is not true. Essentially, any English noun can be used as an
      adjective (and vice versa). Indeed, some grammarians do not distinguish
      noun and adjective at this level and subsume both under "substantives".
      In any case, "noun" and "adjective" are function labels (not "functional
      labels") and whether a given substantive functions as a noun or an
      adjective depends entirely on its use in its own context.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Frank Polak
      Please, let me return to the Latin. The latin passive participle suffixum means attached , suffixed if you want. In Noeldeke s usage it is shorthand for
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 2, 2011
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        Please, let me return to the Latin. The latin passive participle
        suffixum means "attached",
        "suffixed" if you want. In Noeldeke's usage it is shorthand for
        "pronomen suffixum" or
        suffix(ed) pronoun. The alternative "bound" or "free" form seems
        preferable in linguistic
        context.

        Best regards,

        Frank Polak
        Tel Aviv University

        On 02/01/2011, at 19:30, Robert M Whiting wrote:
        > "Suffix pronoun" is a morphological category in contradistinction to
        > "independent pronoun". As such, it serves a useful purpose in
        > classification systems, but outside of this function the concept is
        > better
        > expressed by either "suffixed pronoun" or "pronominal suffix". I
        > usually
        > avoid the classifcation problem by referring to "bound forms" or "free
        > forms" of the personal pronouns.
        >
        >



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