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DSS photo "mystery"

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  • Charles E. Jones
    In a short article published online this morning by BAR: Elizabeth Shanks Alexander Archaeological Views: The Mystery Remains: Who Leaked the Scroll Pictures
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 5, 2010
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      In a short article published online this morning by BAR:

      Elizabeth Shanks Alexander
      Archaeological Views: The Mystery Remains: Who Leaked the Scroll Pictures to BAS?
      http://www.bib-arch.org/bar/article.asp?PubID=BSBA&Volume=36&Issue=5&ArticleID=11

      the author retells the story of the trial in which Elisha Qimron sued her father, BAR editor Hershel Shanks. She ends the piece:

      "To this day, we don’t know the source of the secret photographs that BAS published. My father claims that even he doesn’t know. (He received them from coeditor Professor Robert Eisenman.) It is one of the enduring mysteries of the Dead Sea Scrolls, but one that has largely been forgotten".

      Perhaps I'm mistaken, by I always assumed that the source was The Huntington Library, which had begun distributing a set of 2 35 mm microfilm reels of photographs of the DSS photos in 1991. I had acquired a set for the Oriental Institute Research Archives then, as had many others, and I was aware of a lot of prints made from these microfilms circulating among DSS scholars. As I recall, these microfilms were distributed on permanent loan from and marked as the property of the Huntington Library.

      So did BAS have another source? And if so, did it differ from the Huntington Library set? And does it matter nearly two decades later?

      -Chuck Jones-
      ISAW - NYU
    • Jim West
      More importantly, why has BAR utterly ignored the verdict in the Golb trial and yet featured the not naked not archaeologist simcha jacobovici s search for
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 5, 2010
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        More importantly, why has BAR utterly ignored the verdict in the Golb
        trial and yet featured the not naked not archaeologist simcha
        jacobovici's search for qumran toilets? that's the real mystery.

        On 10/5/2010 10:37 AM, Charles E. Jones wrote:
        > In a short article published online this morning by BAR:
        >
        > Elizabeth Shanks Alexander
        > Archaeological Views: The Mystery Remains: Who Leaked the Scroll Pictures to BAS?
        > http://www.bib-arch.org/bar/article.asp?PubID=BSBA&Volume=36&Issue=5&ArticleID=11
        >
        > the author retells the story of the trial in which Elisha Qimron sued her father, BAR editor Hershel Shanks. She ends the piece:
        >
        > "To this day, we don’t know the source of the secret photographs that BAS published. My father claims that even he doesn’t know. (He received them from coeditor Professor Robert Eisenman.) It is one of the enduring mysteries of the Dead Sea Scrolls, but one that has largely been forgotten".
        >
        > Perhaps I'm mistaken, by I always assumed that the source was The Huntington Library, which had begun distributing a set of 2 35 mm microfilm reels of photographs of the DSS photos in 1991. I had acquired a set for the Oriental Institute Research Archives then, as had many others, and I was aware of a lot of prints made from these microfilms circulating among DSS scholars. As I recall, these microfilms were distributed on permanent loan from and marked as the property of the Huntington Library.
        >
        > So did BAS have another source? And if so, did it differ from the Huntington Library set? And does it matter nearly two decades later?
        >
        > -Chuck Jones-
        > ISAW - NYU
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >

        --
        +++++++
        Jim West, ThD
        Petros, TN
      • Raz Kletter
        Dear Chuck, The daughter does not fall far from the father. If I am not mistaken, the Huntington Library received the photographs for a noble aim - for
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 6, 2010
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          Dear Chuck,
          The daughter 'does not fall far' from the father.
          If I am not mistaken, the Huntington Library received the photographs
          for a noble aim - for safekeeping. That is, in case the scrolls in Jerusalem
          are lost, documentation will survive.
          The issue is not "how" BAR got "secret" photos, but rather the abuse of
          publishing without rights. To say that it was done for "ideology", rather
          than fame and greed, is a miserable excuse.
          There is no big mysetery; but it does matter that we try as best not
          to confuse good and bad.
          Dr. Raz Kletter
          University of Helsinki

          2010/10/5 Charles E. Jones <cejo@...>

          >
          >
          > In a short article published online this morning by BAR:
          >
          > Elizabeth Shanks Alexander
          > Archaeological Views: The Mystery Remains: Who Leaked the Scroll Pictures
          > to BAS?
          >
          > http://www.bib-arch.org/bar/article.asp?PubID=BSBA&Volume=36&Issue=5&ArticleID=11
          >
          > the author retells the story of the trial in which Elisha Qimron sued her
          > father, BAR editor Hershel Shanks. She ends the piece:
          >
          > "To this day, we don�t know the source of the secret photographs that BAS
          > published. My father claims that even he doesn�t know. (He received them
          > from coeditor Professor Robert Eisenman.) It is one of the enduring
          > mysteries of the Dead Sea Scrolls, but one that has largely been forgotten".
          >
          >
          > Perhaps I'm mistaken, by I always assumed that the source was The
          > Huntington Library, which had begun distributing a set of 2 35 mm microfilm
          > reels of photographs of the DSS photos in 1991. I had acquired a set for the
          > Oriental Institute Research Archives then, as had many others, and I was
          > aware of a lot of prints made from these microfilms circulating among DSS
          > scholars. As I recall, these microfilms were distributed on permanent loan
          > from and marked as the property of the Huntington Library.
          >
          > So did BAS have another source? And if so, did it differ from the
          > Huntington Library set? And does it matter nearly two decades later?
          >
          > -Chuck Jones-
          > ISAW - NYU
          >
          >


          --
          Raz Kletter
          Varsaallika 6a Tallinn 12013 Estonia


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