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Re: Re: Re: [ANE-2] SV: Reading revolutions

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  • X.Wang
    Many thanks. Your observations taken. It is also good to know that the SPPs are not all peer reviewed. This would help explain the few times when I got
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 29, 2010
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      Many thanks. Your observations taken. It is also good to know that the SPPs are not all peer reviewed. This would help explain the few times when I got surprised reading the paper, too. What I thought of, or tried to extract from the paper was that, early peoples sharing certain astronomic knowledge does seem possible. This "possible", of course, can simply be the same "possible" as in "anything is possible." -I was told several times by senior scholars doing early (Chinese) astronomy the overwhelming importance of astronomy for the illiterate.

      Xianhua
      2010-08-30




      Dr. Xianhua Wang
      Department of History
      Peking University
      Beijing 100871, China



      发件人: Peter T. Daniels
      发送时间: 2010-08-30 01:32:21
      收件人: ANE-2
      抄送:
      主题: Re: Re: [ANE-2] SV: Reading revolutions


      And that's why "scientific" publications should be peer-reviewed .. the author
      claims that the shapes of a broad miscellany of signs from throughout the
      Near East are imitations of constellations. But he doesn't seem to provide any
      evidence that the people who created the signs (over a wide expanse of space and
      time) connected the stars with lines the same as or similar to the lines he
      drew. (Nor do I find the shapes he comes up with particularly like the shapes of
      the letters.)
      --
      Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
      Jersey City


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Peter T. Daniels
      NB There s a note at the website saying that the papers _are_ (now) peer reviewed, but it doesn t say when that policy came into effect. Quite a few years ago,
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 29, 2010
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        NB There's a note at the website saying that the papers _are_ (now) peer
        reviewed, but it doesn't say when that policy came into effect. Quite a few
        years ago, Victor told me he didn't find peer review necessary; he could adjudge
        the publication-worthiness of submissions himself.
         --
        Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
        Jersey City

        From: X.Wang <e2waxi@...>
        To: ANE-2 <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sun, August 29, 2010 2:12:44 PM
        Subject: Re: Re: Re: [ANE-2] SV: Reading revolutions

         
        Many thanks. Your observations taken. It is also good to know that the SPPs are
        not all peer reviewed. This would help explain the few times when I got
        surprised reading the paper, too. What I thought of, or tried to extract from
        the paper was that, early peoples sharing certain astronomic knowledge does seem
        possible. This "possible", of course, can simply be the same "possible" as in
        "anything is possible." -I was told several times by senior scholars doing early
        (Chinese) astronomy the overwhelming importance of astronomy for the illiterate.

        >
        >Xianhua
        >2010-08-30
        >
        >Dr. Xianhua Wang
        >Department of History
        >Peking University
        >Beijing 100871, China
        >
        >发件人: Peter T. Daniels
        >发送时间: 2010-08-30 01:32:21
        >收件人: ANE-2
        >抄送:
        >主题: Re: Re: [ANE-2] SV: Reading revolutions
        >
        >And that's why "scientific" publications should be peer-reviewed .. the author
        >claims that the shapes of a broad miscellany of signs from throughout the
        >Near East are imitations of constellations. But he doesn't seem to provide any
        >evidence that the people who created the signs (over a wide expanse of space and
        >
        >time) connected the stars with lines the same as or similar to the lines he
        >drew. (Nor do I find the shapes he comes up with particularly like the shapes of
        >
        >the letters.)
        >--
        >Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
        >Jersey City

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • X.Wang
        I ve seen their guidelines, too. But thanks for clarifying. The list may have got too much of Chinese to my benefit. Xianhua 2010-08-30 Dr. Xianhua Wang
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 29, 2010
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          I've seen their guidelines, too. But thanks for clarifying.

          The list may have got too much of Chinese to my benefit.

          Xianhua


          2010-08-30




          Dr. Xianhua Wang
          Department of History
          Peking University
          Beijing 100871, China



          发件人: Peter T. Daniels
          发送时间: 2010-08-30 04:25:36
          收件人: ANE-2
          抄送:
          主题: Re: Re: Re: [ANE-2] SV: Reading revolutions


          NB There's a note at the website saying that the papers _are_ (now) peer
          reviewed, but it doesn't say when that policy came into effect. Quite a few
          years ago, Victor told me he didn't find peer review necessary; he could adjudge
          the publication-worthiness of submissions himself.
          --
          Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
          Jersey City

          From: X.Wang <e2waxi@...>
          To: ANE-2 <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sun, August 29, 2010 2:12:44 PM
          Subject: Re: Re: Re: [ANE-2] SV: Reading revolutions


          Many thanks. Your observations taken. It is also good to know that the SPPs are
          not all peer reviewed. This would help explain the few times when I got
          surprised reading the paper, too. What I thought of, or tried to extract from
          the paper was that, early peoples sharing certain astronomic knowledge does seem
          possible. This "possible", of course, can simply be the same "possible" as in
          "anything is possible." -I was told several times by senior scholars doing early
          (Chinese) astronomy the overwhelming importance of astronomy for the illiterate.

          >
          >Xianhua
          >2010-08-30
          >
          >Dr. Xianhua Wang
          >Department of History
          >Peking University
          >Beijing 100871, China
          >
          >发件人: Peter T. Daniels
          >发送时间: 2010-08-30 01:32:21
          >收件人: ANE-2
          >抄送:
          >主题: Re: Re: [ANE-2] SV: Reading revolutions
          >
          >And that's why "scientific" publications should be peer-reviewed .. the author
          >claims that the shapes of a broad miscellany of signs from throughout the
          >Near East are imitations of constellations. But he doesn't seem to provide any
          >evidence that the people who created the signs (over a wide expanse of space and
          >
          >time) connected the stars with lines the same as or similar to the lines he
          >drew. (Nor do I find the shapes he comes up with particularly like the shapes of
          >
          >the letters.)
          >--
          >Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...
          >Jersey City

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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