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Re: [ANE-2] 3,500 year old bracelet- a comment

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  • Joe Zias
    Unfortunately the dealer Deutsch may be right in this instance, for the wrong reasons. Archaeologists today are prevented from removing burials due to
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 3, 2010
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      Unfortunately the dealer Deutsch may be right in this instance, for the wrong
      reasons. Archaeologists today are prevented from removing burials due to
      religious pressure from the religious extremists and the threat of physical
      violence. As a result they seldom see material commonly found in cemeteries,
      such as bracelets coming from Islamic burials and other contexts. Dealers on
      the other hand, of which Deutsch is one, are familiar with Islamic jewelery as
      see this material daily in their dealings with grave robbers, from which they
      get the bulk of their material. They in effect keep the looters in business and
      in turn destroy the cultural heritage they were once taught to protect and
      respect. Just another way of former archaeologists to 'pimp off' the ancient
      near east.


      Joe


      Joe Zias www.joezias.com
      Anthropology/Paleopathology

      Science and Antiquity Group - Jerusalem
      Jerusalem, Israel




      ________________________________
      From: Trudy Kawami <tkawami@...>
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, August 3, 2010 11:44:19 PM
      Subject: [ANE-2] 3,500 year old bracelet- a comment


      Eliot,

      I was the Moderator who approved the posting in its second version. I
      assumed that readers would respond based on the photo of the bracelet
      whether Robert Deutsch was accurate in his characterization of the
      knowledge of the excavator. I guess I was wrong, & it is my fault.

      Nonetheless, I am puzzled that you yourself admit that you can't tell if
      the bracelet is Bronze Age or Electric Age. There is a significant
      difference - IF the original identification is inaccurate. So let's
      examine the artifact itself. As much as we wish to keep the list on a
      rational, scholarly plane, we cannot, as we are presently set up,
      restrict comments based on the profession - or lack of one - of the
      writer.

      Trudy S. Kawami, Ph.D.

      Director of Research

      Arthur M. Sackler Foundation

      461 East 57th Street

      New York, NY 10022

      www.arthurmsacklerfdn.org

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • eliot braun
      Hi, That s not the point. I supspect Deutsch is correct in his evaluation. It s just the way he stated it. I consider that flaming . There are ways to do
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 4, 2010
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        Hi, That's not the point. I supspect Deutsch is correct in his evaluation. It's just the way he stated it. I consider that "flaming". There are ways to do things and ways not to.
         
        He has an axe to grind and he's a dealer, big time; makes mucho gelt from selling patrimony and quite possibly forgeries (this I believe in my heart of hearts). That being said, he need not have added the word "shame". I'm ashamed that he's a countryman and a supposed archaeologist. He heaps shame on us.
        Best wishes,

        Eliot Braun, Ph D
        Sr. Fellow WF Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem
        Associate Researcher Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem
        PO Box 21, Har Adar 90836 Israel
        Tel 972-2-5345687, Cell 972-50-2231096

        --- On Tue, 8/3/10, Trudy Kawami <tkawami@...> wrote:


        From: Trudy Kawami <tkawami@...>
        Subject: [ANE-2] 3,500 year old bracelet- a comment
        To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, August 3, 2010, 11:44 PM


         



        Eliot,

        I was the Moderator who approved the posting in its second version. I
        assumed that readers would respond based on the photo of the bracelet
        whether Robert Deutsch was accurate in his characterization of the
        knowledge of the excavator. I guess I was wrong, & it is my fault.

        Nonetheless, I am puzzled that you yourself admit that you can't tell if
        the bracelet is Bronze Age or Electric Age. There is a significant
        difference - IF the original identification is inaccurate. So let's
        examine the artifact itself. As much as we wish to keep the list on a
        rational, scholarly plane, we cannot, as we are presently set up,
        restrict comments based on the profession - or lack of one - of the
        writer.

        Trudy S. Kawami, Ph.D.

        Director of Research

        Arthur M. Sackler Foundation

        461 East 57th Street

        New York, NY 10022

        www.arthurmsacklerfdn.org

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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