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RE: [ANE-2] Re: Question, Ramat Rahel

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  • Yigal Levin
    The present excavator, Oded Lipschits of Tel Aviv University, does not think that Ramat Rahel was the palace of any of the kings of Judah. He sees it as the
    Message 1 of 6 , May 12, 2010
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      The present excavator, Oded Lipschits of Tel Aviv University, does not think
      that Ramat Rahel was the palace of any of the kings of Judah. He sees it as
      the seat of the Assyrian, Babylonian and the Persian governors who
      controlled Judah, even while there was still a vassal king in Jerusalem,
      certainly after the city was destroyed. You can see the project website at
      http://www.tau.ac.il/~rmtrachl/index.html.





      Yigal Levin

      Bar-Ilan University

      _____

      From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      frankclancy
      Sent: Tuesday, May 11, 2010 9:56 PM
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Question, Ramat Rahel





      Dear Russell - Jehoiakim ruled 11 years according to the book of Kings. His
      son Jehoiachin ruled for 3 months. Usually, you are accurate about these
      things so your mind must be distracted for the moment. However, it is
      interesting that Daniel 1:1 indicates Jehoiakim ruled for just 3 years and
      the text describing his rule in the book of Kings says he was a loyal
      servant of Nebuchadnezzer for 3 years and then rebelled. So the regnal term
      of 11 years may be the work of redaction. Also, if Jehoiakim had to pay such
      a large fine, is it likely he had the money to build a new fancy palace?

      Frank Clancy
      Waterloo, Ontario Canada

      --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups. <mailto:ANE-2%40yahoogroups.com> com,
      RUSSELLGMIRKIN@... wrote:
      >
      > Dear list,
      >
      > The royal palace in the citadel in Stratum Va of Ramat Rahel uncovered in
      > 1959-1964 was provisionally dated by the excavator Aharoni to the time of
      > Jehoiakim based on a comparison of window balustrades with proto-Aeolic
      > colonnettes with Jer. 22.14, which refers to construction of a royal
      palace with
      > cut windows. Is this likely, given that Jehoiakim only ruled three
      > months, the omission of palace location in Jer. 22, and the tenuous
      redactional
      > link between the poem and the preceding reference to Jehoiakim? I know
      > there have been ongoing excavations there. Do later excavators concur with

      > Aharoni?
      >
      > Best regards,
      > Russell Gmirkin
      >
      > Portland, OR





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • RUSSELLGMIRKIN@aol.com
      Yigal, Thanks for the comments clarifying the interpretation of the site held by Oded Lipschits. The Ramat Rahel website hinted in that direction (that the
      Message 2 of 6 , May 12, 2010
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        Yigal,

        Thanks for the comments clarifying the interpretation of the site held by
        Oded Lipschits. The Ramat Rahel website hinted in that direction (that the
        palace citadel of Stratum Va was not that of a Judean king). A passage
        from the website I quote below indicated that "A luxurious Assyrian palace
        was found in the debris that covered the citadel after its destruction by the
        Babylonians." Am I to infer that this Assyrian palace is the same one
        that previous excavators attributed to either Jehoiachin or his father
        Jehoiakim?

        Best regards,
        Russell Gmirkin

        From _http://www.tau.ac.il/~rmtrachl/archaeology%20of%20site.htm_
        (http://www.tau.ac.il/~rmtrachl/archaeology%20of%20site.htm) :

        "The royal citadel at Ramat Rahel is one of the most instructive examples
        of Israelite-Phoenician architecture in the biblical period. The
        construction of the casemate walls and the buildings of the citadel were of excellent
        quality, with smoothed and squared stones laid in well-fitted courses. The
        main gate, built of large, dressed stones, also shows fine workmanship.
        Several complete proto-Aeolic capitals were found in the ruins of the
        citadel; they once decorated the doorposts of the main gate and the entrances to
        the buildings.
        "Window balustrades consisting of a row of stone colonnettes, decorated
        with palmettes and topped with joined capitals in the proto-Aeolic style,
        were also found. They probably adorned the upper story of the buildings inside
        the citadel. These decorative architectural elements echo a verse in the
        book of Jeremiah, which describes the windows in the house of Jehoiakim,
        king of Judah: "and cut out windows for it, paneling it with cedar, and
        painting it with vermilion... " (Jeremiah 22:14).
        "A luxurious Assyrian palace was found in the debris that covered the
        citadel after its destruction by the Babylonians. One of the unique finds was a
        seal impression with the inscription to Eliaqim, steward of Yochin.
        Eliaqim is thought to have been an official of King Jehoiachin, king of Judah and
        son of King Jehoiakim."
        The present excavator, Oded Lipschits of Tel Aviv University, does not
        think
        that Ramat Rahel was the palace of any of the kings of Judah. He sees it as
        the seat of the Assyrian, Babylonian and the Persian governors who
        controlled Judah, even while there was still a vassal king in Jerusalem,
        certainly after the city was destroyed. You can see the project website at
        _http://www.tau.http://www.tau.http://www._
        (http://www.tau.ac.il/~rmtrachl/index.html.)

        Yigal Levin

        Bar-Ilan University


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • zmbq
        Hi. I was one on a tour at the site with one of the excavators (not Oded, someone who worked with him whose name eludes me). He, too, raised the possibility
        Message 3 of 6 , May 14, 2010
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          Hi.

          I was one on a tour at the site with one of the excavators (not Oded, someone who worked with him whose name eludes me). He, too, raised the possibility that the site was originally an Assyrian palace used to keep an eye on Jerusalem. He also suggested that it was indeed used by the Jeohiakim, which was at a time after the fall of the Assyrian empire.

          Both suggestions are reasonable (and non-exclusive), I don't know if there's any way of disproving one of them with the finds we have today.

          Itay Zandbank
          Israel

          --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, RUSSELLGMIRKIN@... wrote:
          >
          > Yigal,
          >
          > Thanks for the comments clarifying the interpretation of the site held by
          > Oded Lipschits. The Ramat Rahel website hinted in that direction (that the
          > palace citadel of Stratum Va was not that of a Judean king). A passage
          > from the website I quote below indicated that "A luxurious Assyrian palace
          > was found in the debris that covered the citadel after its destruction by the
          > Babylonians." Am I to infer that this Assyrian palace is the same one
          > that previous excavators attributed to either Jehoiachin or his father
          > Jehoiakim?
          >
          > Best regards,
          > Russell Gmirkin
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