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Re: [ANE-2] Yau in Sealand personal names

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  • victor avigdor hurowitz
    Have a look at R. Zadok, The Earliest Diaspora: Israelites adn Judeans in Pre-hellenistic Mesopotamian Tel Aviv 2002 p. 14 where he has some new names with
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 3, 2010
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      Have a look at R. Zadok, The Earliest Diaspora: Israelites adn Judeans in
      Pre-hellenistic Mesopotamian Tel Aviv 2002 p. 14 where he has some new
      names with (d)ia-a-hu-u' where previous only spellings with <-ma>
      (/w/) were known.
      Victor Hurowitz
      BGU



      On Wed, 27 Jan 2010, Rolf Furuli wrote:

      > Dear Bjarte,
      >
      > There is a question whether the ia-ú element is
      > related to the YHWH/YHW found in Tanakh and
      > Elephantine papyri. (BTW, Yahweh is an artificial
      > form which has no support in ancient Hebrew
      > manuscripts whatsoever-but there are reasons to
      > believe that the name had three syllables and not
      > only two.)
      >
      > R. Zadok. 1979. "The Jews in Babylonia during the
      > Chaldean and Achaemenid Periods," pp. 14-16 has
      > the following correspondences between Akkadian
      > and Hebrew names:
      >
      > +u-ib-ia-a-ma - +obiyyahu
      >
      > za-ka-a-ri-'a-a-ma - Zwkaryahu
      >
      > Ga-da-al-ia-a-ma - Gedalyahu
      >
      > d ia-ku-ú-ki-nu and ia )u.ia-)-kin7, and Ia-)-ú-kin7-Jehoyyakin
      >
      > d ia-hu-ú-na-ta-nu-yahonatan.
      >
      > The divine element YHW is spelled differently in
      > Akkadian in initial and final position, and the
      > same is true in the Tanakh. I would like to hear
      > the opinions of the list-members as to the
      > relationship between the Hebrew -yahu and the
      > Akkadian -a-ma.
      >
      >
      > Best regards,
      >
      > Rolf Furuli
      > University of Oslo
      >
      > (Bjarte and I both belong to the "Friday-club" at
      > the University of Oslo, who for many years have
      > come together every Friday to read cuneiform
      > tablets and ancient manuscripts.)
      >
      >
      >
      > >Dear list,
      > >In Stephanie Dalley's edition of 474 tablets from the Schøyen Collection
      > >(CUSAS Vol. 9, CDL Press, 2009), she identifies two Akkadian names, ÌR-ia-ú
      > >(Arad-Yau), and ì-lí-ia-ú (Ili-Yau) whose second part is the West Semitic
      > >divine name Yau. At this time (16th century) Yau/Yahweh "would be god of
      > >Midian and Edom ... which one may connect with MBA/LBA cities at Qurayya ...
      > >and Tayma ... It may perhaps be deduced that there was a south-western god
      > >Yau who became assimilated into Babylonia at this period, perhaps as a
      > >hypostasis of the storm god Adad, so that the divine name was used with
      > >Akkadian elements ..." (Dalley, p. 72). Yau is also attested in a (later)
      > >Kassite name from Nippur.
      > >
      > >Best wishes,
      > >Bjarte Kaldhol
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >------------------------------------
      > >
      > >Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
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