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Re: [ANE-2] Yau in Sealand personal names

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  • Graham Hagens
    Sealand was a region in the Babylonian coastal marshland. Being quite isolated from the rest of  Babylonia, Sealand enjoyed a certain degree of autonomy,
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 28, 2010
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      Sealand was a region in the Babylonian coastal marshland.
      Being quite isolated from the rest of  Babylonia, Sealand enjoyed a certain degree of autonomy, and on at least two occasions independent Sealand dynasties are attested.
      The possiblity that these existed contemporaneously with other Babylonian dynasties has resulted in some not insignificant chronological confusion.
       
      Graham Hagens
      Hamilton, ON 

      --- On Wed, 1/27/10, X.Wang <e2waxi@...> wrote:


      From: X.Wang <e2waxi@...>
      Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Yau in Sealand personal names
      To: "ANE-2" <ANE-2@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Wednesday, January 27, 2010, 5:07 AM


       



      What does the Sealand in the title refer to?

      Sorry if I am asking a stupid question.

      x.w.

      2010-01-27

      Dr. Xianhua Wang
      Department of History
      Peking University
      Beijing 100871, China

      发件人: Bjarte Kaldhol
      发送时间: 2010-01-27 17:45:51
      收件人: ANE-2@yahoogroups. com
      抄送:
      主题: [ANE-2] Yau in Sealand personal names



      Dear list,
      In Stephanie Dalley's edition of 474 tablets from the Schøyen Collection
      (CUSAS Vol. 9, CDL Press, 2009), she identifies two Akkadian names, ÌR-ia-ú
      (Arad-Yau), and ì-lí-ia-ú (Ili-Yau) whose second part is the West Semitic
      divine name Yau. At this time (16th century) Yau/Yahweh "would be god of
      Midian and Edom ... which one may connect with MBA/LBA cities at Qurayya ...
      and Tayma ... It may perhaps be deduced that there was a south-western god
      Yau who became assimilated into Babylonia at this period, perhaps as a
      hypostasis of the storm god Adad, so that the divine name was used with
      Akkadian elements ..." (Dalley, p. 72). Yau is also attested in a (later)
      Kassite name from Nippur.

      Best wishes,
      Bjarte Kaldhol











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