Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Yau in Sealand personal names

Expand Messages
  • Brian Colless
    Bjarte, this is very timely. It so happens that I have spent my day (though it was not what I had intended to do when I got out of bed) considering the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 27, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Bjarte, this is very timely. It so happens that I have spent my day
      (though it was not what I had intended to do when I got out of bed)
      considering the evidence concerning the Shasu of Yhw, and examining my
      collection of inscriptions from the Negev, Arava, and Timna.

      Most pertinent to this matter of the deity YW/YH are the rock
      inscriptions from Har Karkom (the true Mount Horeb/Sinai), and I will
      take this opportunity or recording for my own use what I have noticed.

      #2 examples of YH on stones (an arm [yad] and a jubilater [hll], in
      each case standing on hands), written sinistrograde (R-L)

      # YH (with H upright) on a stone, to the left of a robed figure
      standing inside a shrine (unless the half-circle is a halo);
      remarkably this rock is among a group situated near an area that has
      been intentionally cleared, and has been suggested as the site of the
      Tabernacle (and if you know the right size for the cubit, it will fit
      perfectly there, as the first temple does on the Jerusalem Mount at
      the Dome of the Rock).

      Recently I reported another stone I have seen in a photograph, which
      has ' (ox) L (crook) Sh (sun) S (fish), presumably signifying EL (God)
      and ShaSu people.

      I have also been reading on the web (with a break to go to the cinema
      to see NOODLE, in Hebrew and Chinese, and hardly understood a word of
      either language at that speed) the theories of James R. Harris on the
      Old Negev language and script; he also finds YH there but not the same
      as my examples, and his readings of the inscriptions in the Sinai
      mines are quite different from mine; but having established to his own
      satisfaction what the signs of the Old Negev alphabet were, he then
      takes us to places like Utah and Mexico, to find YH among their
      petroglyphs, and on Olmec seals (*The Name of God: From Sinai to the
      American Southwest).

      I mention this because I am going to release a Canaanite inscription
      that seems to establish that the Phoenicians did cross the Atlantic,
      but I doubt that they brought the god YH with them, though they did
      carry the art of logo-syllabic writing (which they had invented by
      2300 BCE, and which they had already passed on to the Cretans and the
      Luwians).

      By the way, one of the actresses in the movie has the name Anat, and I
      have been trying to establish when the goddess`Anat first reached
      Egypt (just before the Hyksos took over the Delta, I redd today); she
      is in the Wadi el-Hol graffiti, you know.

      Brian Colless


      On 27/01/2010, at 10:45 PM, Bjarte Kaldhol wrote:

      >
      > Dear list,
      > In Stephanie Dalley's edition of 474 tablets from the Sch�yen
      > Collection
      > (CUSAS Vol. 9, CDL Press, 2009), she identifies two Akkadian names,
      > �R-ia-�
      > (Arad-Yau), and �-l�-ia-� (Ili-Yau) whose second part is the West
      > Semitic
      > divine name Yau. At this time (16th century) Yau/Yahweh "would be
      > god of
      > Midian and Edom ... which one may connect with MBA/LBA cities at
      > Qurayya ...
      > and Tayma ... It may perhaps be deduced that there was a south-
      > western god
      > Yau who became assimilated into Babylonia at this period, perhaps as a
      > hypostasis of the storm god Adad, so that the divine name was used
      > with
      > Akkadian elements ..." (Dalley, p. 72). Yau is also attested in a
      > (later)
      > Kassite name from Nippur.
      >
      > Best wishes,
      > Bjarte Kaldhol
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rolf Furuli
      Dear Bjarte, There is a question whether the ia-ú element is related to the YHWH/YHW found in Tanakh and Elephantine papyri. (BTW, Yahweh is an artificial
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 27, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Bjarte,

        There is a question whether the ia-ú element is
        related to the YHWH/YHW found in Tanakh and
        Elephantine papyri. (BTW, Yahweh is an artificial
        form which has no support in ancient Hebrew
        manuscripts whatsoever-but there are reasons to
        believe that the name had three syllables and not
        only two.)

        R. Zadok. 1979. "The Jews in Babylonia during the
        Chaldean and Achaemenid Periods," pp. 14-16 has
        the following correspondences between Akkadian
        and Hebrew names:

        +u-ib-ia-a-ma - +obiyyahu

        za-ka-a-ri-'a-a-ma - Zwkaryahu

        Ga-da-al-ia-a-ma - Gedalyahu

        d ia-ku-ú-ki-nu and ia )u.ia-)-kin7, and Ia-)-ú-kin7-Jehoyyakin

        d ia-hu-ú-na-ta-nu-yahonatan.

        The divine element YHW is spelled differently in
        Akkadian in initial and final position, and the
        same is true in the Tanakh. I would like to hear
        the opinions of the list-members as to the
        relationship between the Hebrew -yahu and the
        Akkadian -a-ma.


        Best regards,

        Rolf Furuli
        University of Oslo

        (Bjarte and I both belong to the "Friday-club" at
        the University of Oslo, who for many years have
        come together every Friday to read cuneiform
        tablets and ancient manuscripts.)



        >Dear list,
        >In Stephanie Dalley's edition of 474 tablets from the Schøyen Collection
        >(CUSAS Vol. 9, CDL Press, 2009), she identifies two Akkadian names, ÌR-ia-ú
        >(Arad-Yau), and ì-lí-ia-ú (Ili-Yau) whose second part is the West Semitic
        >divine name Yau. At this time (16th century) Yau/Yahweh "would be god of
        >Midian and Edom ... which one may connect with MBA/LBA cities at Qurayya ...
        >and Tayma ... It may perhaps be deduced that there was a south-western god
        >Yau who became assimilated into Babylonia at this period, perhaps as a
        >hypostasis of the storm god Adad, so that the divine name was used with
        >Akkadian elements ..." (Dalley, p. 72). Yau is also attested in a (later)
        >Kassite name from Nippur.
        >
        >Best wishes,
        >Bjarte Kaldhol
        >
        >
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >------------------------------------
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • David Hall
        Brian, What makes you think Har Karkom is the true Mount Horeb/Sinai?   This place in the southern Negev is quite desolate.  Parts of the Negev from
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 27, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Brian,

          What makes you think Har Karkom is the "true Mount Horeb/Sinai?"  This place in the southern Negev is quite desolate.  Parts of the Negev from Beersheeba to the south were found to contain EB settlements, but not LBA settlements, except for the Egyptian mining areas north of Eilat at Timnah Park. Studies of the Sinai did not find much in terms of LBA remains except along the northern coastal road named "The Way of Horus," and at the turquiose mines in the south at Serabit al-Khadem.  Petroglyphs have also been found in Northern Arabia, but it is difficult to date them.  Squiggles on stone might easily be interpreted as Y_ and Yahwistic, but there were no libraries found there or records to show the roads by which the artists wandered or when they lived there.  If you are to take Exodus literally you would find Israel baked and boiled their manna.  The remains of charcoal from campsites in the Sinai have not yet identified LBA
          campsites in areas thought to have been visited by the Israelis including the ruins at Kadesh Barnea near Ain Kadeis.   

          David Q. Hall
          Falls Church, Virginia



          ________________________________
          From: Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
          To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wed, January 27, 2010 7:03:12 AM
          Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Yau in Sealand personal names

          Bjarte, this is very timely. It so happens that I have spent my day 
          (though it was not what I had intended to do when I got out of bed) 
          considering the evidence concerning the Shasu of Yhw, and examining my 
          collection of inscriptions from the Negev, Arava, and Timna.

          Most pertinent to this matter of the deity YW/YH are the rock 
          inscriptions from Har Karkom (the true Mount Horeb/Sinai), and I will 
          take this opportunity or recording for my own use what I have noticed.

          #2 examples of YH on stones (an arm [yad] and a jubilater [hll], in 
          each case standing on hands), written sinistrograde (R-L)

            # YH (with H upright) on a stone, to the left of a robed figure 
          standing inside a shrine (unless the half-circle is a halo); 
          remarkably this rock is among a group situated near an area that has 
          been intentionally cleared, and has been suggested as the site of the 
          Tabernacle (and if you know the right size for the cubit, it will fit 
          perfectly there, as the first temple does on the Jerusalem Mount at 
          the Dome of the Rock).

          Recently I reported another stone I have seen in a photograph, which 
          has ' (ox) L (crook) Sh (sun) S (fish), presumably signifying EL (God) 
          and ShaSu people.

          I have also been reading on the web (with a break to go to the cinema 
          to see  NOODLE, in Hebrew and Chinese, and hardly understood a word of 
          either language at that speed) the theories of James R. Harris on the 
          Old Negev language and script; he also finds YH there but not the same 
          as my examples, and his readings of  the inscriptions in the Sinai 
          mines are quite different from mine; but having established to his own 
          satisfaction what the signs of the Old Negev alphabet were, he then 
          takes us to places like Utah and Mexico, to find YH among their 
          petroglyphs, and on Olmec seals (*The Name of God: From Sinai  to the 
          American Southwest).

          I mention this because I am going to release a Canaanite inscription 
          that seems to establish that the Phoenicians did cross the Atlantic, 
          but I doubt that they brought the god YH with them, though they did 
          carry the art of logo-syllabic writing  (which they had invented by 
          2300 BCE, and which they had already passed on to the Cretans and the 
          Luwians).

          By the way, one of the actresses in the movie has the name Anat, and I 
          have been trying to establish when the goddess`Anat first reached 
          Egypt (just before the Hyksos took over the Delta, I redd today); she 
          is in the Wadi el-Hol graffiti, you know.

          Brian Colless


          On 27/01/2010, at 10:45 PM, Bjarte Kaldhol wrote:

          >
          > Dear list,
          > In Stephanie Dalley's edition of 474 tablets from the Schøyen 
          > Collection
          > (CUSAS Vol. 9, CDL Press, 2009), she identifies two Akkadian names, 
          > ÌR-ia-ú
          > (Arad-Yau), and ì-lí-ia-ú (Ili-Yau) whose second part is the West 
          > Semitic
          > divine name Yau. At this time (16th century) Yau/Yahweh "would be 
          > god of
          > Midian and Edom ... which one may connect with MBA/LBA cities at 
          > Qurayya ...
          > and Tayma ... It may perhaps be deduced that there was a south-
          > western god
          > Yau who became assimilated into Babylonia at this period, perhaps as a
          > hypostasis of the storm god Adad, so that the divine name was used 
          > with
          > Akkadian elements ..." (Dalley, p. 72). Yau is also attested in a 
          > (later)
          > Kassite name from Nippur.
          >
          > Best wishes,
          > Bjarte Kaldhol
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brian Colless
          David, Can I try the short answer: the mountain was a place of pilgrimage (the prophet Eliyahu went there for a mystical tune-up, in the cavethat is there at
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 27, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            David,

            Can I try the short answer: the mountain was a place of pilgrimage
            (the prophet Eliyahu went there for a mystical tune-up, in the
            cavethat is there at the top), and nowadays it is for tourism (a guide
            who takes people there is my informant, sending me the photographs);
            the story says that they moved on from there.

            The one down south in the Peninsula is hot, too; but when I walked to
            the top of it on a January morning I felt freezing cold.

            The Y is only a stroke (for an arm) but the H has to be a stick figure
            with arms and legs; they are examples of writing, Late Bronze Age,
            saying YH, and also EL, and ShS (Shasu?).

            And this one:

            Y B S ` N K H
            "The wellspring has dried up here" (?)
            (But shouldn't it be YShBT, -t for feminine `ayin? Maybe it was a
            sibboleth tribe.
            My guide tells me there are no springs around there. Precisely. That's
            why they put the sign up.

            Shalom/Salaam
            Brian Colless
            Massey University, NZ

            On 28/01/2010, at 10:32 AM, David Hall wrote:

            > Brian,
            >
            > What makes you think Har Karkom is the "true Mount Horeb/Sinai?"
            > This place in the southern Negev is quite desolate. Parts of the
            > Negev from Beersheeba to the south were found to contain EB
            > settlements, but not LBA settlements, except for the Egyptian mining
            > areas north of Eilat at Timnah Park. Studies of the Sinai did not
            > find much in terms of LBA remains except along the northern coastal
            > road named "The Way of Horus," and at the turquiose mines in the
            > south at Serabit al-Khadem. Petroglyphs have also been found in
            > Northern Arabia, but it is difficult to date them. Squiggles on
            > stone might easily be interpreted as Y_ and Yahwistic, but there
            > were no libraries found there or records to show the roads by which
            > the artists wandered or when they lived there. If you are to take
            > Exodus literally you would find Israel baked and boiled their
            > manna. The remains of charcoal from campsites in the Sinai have not
            > yet identified LBA
            > campsites in areas thought to have been visited by the Israelis
            > including the ruins at Kadesh Barnea near Ain Kadeis.
            >
            > David Q. Hall
            > Falls Church, Virginia
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
            > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Wed, January 27, 2010 7:03:12 AM
            > Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Yau in Sealand personal names
            >
            > Bjarte, this is very timely. It so happens that I have spent my day
            > (though it was not what I had intended to do when I got out of bed)
            > considering the evidence concerning the Shasu of Yhw, and examining my
            > collection of inscriptions from the Negev, Arava, and Timna.
            >
            > Most pertinent to this matter of the deity YW/YH are the rock
            > inscriptions from Har Karkom (the true Mount Horeb/Sinai), and I will
            > take this opportunity or recording for my own use what I have noticed.
            >
            > #2 examples of YH on stones (an arm [yad] and a jubilater [hll], in
            > each case standing on hands), written sinistrograde (R-L)
            >
            > # YH (with H upright) on a stone, to the left of a robed figure
            > standing inside a shrine (unless the half-circle is a halo);
            > remarkably this rock is among a group situated near an area that has
            > been intentionally cleared, and has been suggested as the site of the
            > Tabernacle (and if you know the right size for the cubit, it will fit
            > perfectly there, as the first temple does on the Jerusalem Mount at
            > the Dome of the Rock).
            >
            > Recently I reported another stone I have seen in a photograph, which
            > has ' (ox) L (crook) Sh (sun) S (fish), presumably signifying EL (God)
            > and ShaSu people.
            >
            > I have also been reading on the web (with a break to go to the cinema
            > to see NOODLE, in Hebrew and Chinese, and hardly understood a word of
            > either language at that speed) the theories of James R. Harris on the
            > Old Negev language and script; he also finds YH there but not the same
            > as my examples, and his readings of the inscriptions in the Sinai
            > mines are quite different from mine; but having established to his own
            > satisfaction what the signs of the Old Negev alphabet were, he then
            > takes us to places like Utah and Mexico, to find YH among their
            > petroglyphs, and on Olmec seals (*The Name of God: From Sinai to the
            > American Southwest).
            >
            > I mention this because I am going to release a Canaanite inscription
            > that seems to establish that the Phoenicians did cross the Atlantic,
            > but I doubt that they brought the god YH with them, though they did
            > carry the art of logo-syllabic writing (which they had invented by
            > 2300 BCE, and which they had already passed on to the Cretans and the
            > Luwians).
            >
            > By the way, one of the actresses in the movie has the name Anat, and I
            > have been trying to establish when the goddess`Anat first reached
            > Egypt (just before the Hyksos took over the Delta, I redd today); she
            > is in the Wadi el-Hol graffiti, you know.
            >
            > Brian Colless
            >
            > On 27/01/2010, at 10:45 PM, Bjarte Kaldhol wrote:
            >
            > >
            > > Dear list,
            > > In Stephanie Dalley's edition of 474 tablets from the Sch�yen
            > > Collection
            > > (CUSAS Vol. 9, CDL Press, 2009), she identifies two Akkadian names,
            > > �R-ia-�
            > > (Arad-Yau), and �-l�-ia-� (Ili-Yau) whose second part is the West
            > > Semitic
            > > divine name Yau. At this time (16th century) Yau/Yahweh "would be
            > > god of
            > > Midian and Edom ... which one may connect with MBA/LBA cities at
            > > Qurayya ...
            > > and Tayma ... It may perhaps be deduced that there was a south-
            > > western god
            > > Yau who became assimilated into Babylonia at this period, perhaps
            > as a
            > > hypostasis of the storm god Adad, so that the divine name was used
            > > with
            > > Akkadian elements ..." (Dalley, p. 72). Yau is also attested in a
            > > (later)
            > > Kassite name from Nippur.
            > >
            > > Best wishes,
            > > Bjarte Kaldhol
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Hall
            Years ago two Americans, Bob Cornuke and Larry Williams, used deception to gain entry into Saudi Arabia and visited Jebel Lawz (Mt. Almond) above the Straits
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 28, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Years ago two Americans, Bob Cornuke and Larry Williams, used deception to gain entry into Saudi Arabia and visited Jebel Lawz (Mt. Almond) above the Straits of Tiran.  They photographed a petroglyph of  a cow or bull and found some Nabatean ruins and declared they had found the true Mt. Sinai.  They were apprehended during their expedition and deported.

              After Oded Golan's forgery of inscriptions it is difficult to accept dating a site on paleography alone.  I read the first book about Har Karkom: The Mountain of God : Har Karkom / Emmanuel Anati (1986), he published petroglyphs, but I cannot recall any report of LBA pottery or LBA inscriptions.  I was looking for Exodus at the time and concluded I had read the book and found no evidence for Exodus in it.

              There was graffiti of "Yahweh and his Asherah," found at Kuntillet Ajrud dated to the eighth century when Kadesh Barnea was also occupied along a trade route that bypassed Philistine territory.

              David Q. Hall
              Falls  Church, Virginia

               



              ________________________________
              From: Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
              To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, January 28, 2010 12:16:19 AM
              Subject: [ANE-2] Yau and Yah in the wilderness

              David,

              Can I try the short answer: the mountain was a place of pilgrimage 
              (the prophet Eliyahu went there for a mystical tune-up, in the 
              cavethat is there at the top), and nowadays it is for tourism (a guide 
              who takes people there is my informant, sending me the photographs); 
              the story says that they moved on from there.

              The one down south in the Peninsula is  hot, too; but when I walked to 
              the top of it on a January morning I felt freezing cold.

              The Y is only a stroke (for an arm) but the H has to be a stick figure 
              with arms and legs; they are examples of writing, Late Bronze Age, 
              saying YH, and also EL, and ShS (Shasu?).

              And this one:

              Y B S ` N K H
              "The wellspring has dried up here" (?)
              (But shouldn't it be YShBT, -t for feminine `ayin? Maybe it was a 
              sibboleth tribe.
              My guide tells me there are no springs around there. Precisely. That's 
              why they put the sign up.

              Shalom/Salaam
              Brian Colless
              Massey University, NZ

              On 28/01/2010, at 10:32 AM, David Hall wrote:

              > Brian,
              >
              > What makes you think Har Karkom is the "true Mount Horeb/Sinai?" 
              > This place in the southern Negev is quite desolate.  Parts of the 
              > Negev from Beersheeba to the south were found to contain EB 
              > settlements, but not LBA settlements, except for the Egyptian mining 
              > areas north of Eilat at Timnah Park. Studies of the Sinai did not 
              > find much in terms of LBA remains except along the northern coastal 
              > road named "The Way of Horus," and at the turquiose mines in the 
              > south at Serabit al-Khadem.  Petroglyphs have also been found in 
              > Northern Arabia, but it is difficult to date them.  Squiggles on 
              > stone might easily be interpreted as Y_ and Yahwistic, but there 
              > were no libraries found there or records to show the roads by which 
              > the artists wandered or when they lived there.  If you are to take 
              > Exodus literally you would find Israel baked and boiled their 
              > manna.  The remains of charcoal from campsites in the Sinai have not 
              > yet identified LBA
              > campsites in areas thought to have been visited by the Israelis 
              > including the ruins at Kadesh Barnea near Ain Kadeis.
              >
              > David Q. Hall
              > Falls Church, Virginia
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
              > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Wed, January 27, 2010 7:03:12 AM
              > Subject: [ANE-2] Re: Yau in Sealand personal names
              >
              > Bjarte, this is very timely. It so happens that I have spent my day
              > (though it was not what I had intended to do when I got out of bed)
              > considering the evidence concerning the Shasu of Yhw, and examining my
              > collection of inscriptions from the Negev, Arava, and Timna.
              >
              > Most pertinent to this matter of the deity YW/YH are the rock
              > inscriptions from Har Karkom (the true Mount Horeb/Sinai), and I will
              > take this opportunity or recording for my own use what I have noticed.
              >
              > #2 examples of YH on stones (an arm [yad] and a jubilater [hll], in
              > each case standing on hands), written sinistrograde (R-L)
              >
              >  # YH (with H upright) on a stone, to the left of a robed figure
              > standing inside a shrine (unless the half-circle is a halo);
              > remarkably this rock is among a group situated near an area that has
              > been intentionally cleared, and has been suggested as the site of the
              > Tabernacle (and if you know the right size for the cubit, it will fit
              > perfectly there, as the first temple does on the Jerusalem Mount at
              > the Dome of the Rock).
              >
              > Recently I reported another stone I have seen in a photograph, which
              > has ' (ox) L (crook) Sh (sun) S (fish), presumably signifying EL (God)
              > and ShaSu people.
              >
              > I have also been reading on the web (with a break to go to the cinema
              > to see  NOODLE, in Hebrew and Chinese, and hardly understood a word of
              > either language at that speed) the theories of James R. Harris on the
              > Old Negev language and script; he also finds YH there but not the same
              > as my examples, and his readings of  the inscriptions in the Sinai
              > mines are quite different from mine; but having established to his own
              > satisfaction what the signs of the Old Negev alphabet were, he then
              > takes us to places like Utah and Mexico, to find YH among their
              > petroglyphs, and on Olmec seals (*The Name of God: From Sinai  to the
              > American Southwest).
              >
              > I mention this because I am going to release a Canaanite inscription
              > that seems to establish that the Phoenicians did cross the Atlantic,
              > but I doubt that they brought the god YH with them, though they did
              > carry the art of logo-syllabic writing  (which they had invented by
              > 2300 BCE, and which they had already passed on to the Cretans and the
              > Luwians).
              >
              > By the way, one of the actresses in the movie has the name Anat, and I
              > have been trying to establish when the goddess`Anat first reached
              > Egypt (just before the Hyksos took over the Delta, I redd today); she
              > is in the Wadi el-Hol graffiti, you know.
              >
              > Brian Colless
              >
              > On 27/01/2010, at 10:45 PM, Bjarte Kaldhol wrote:
              >
              > >
              > > Dear list,
              > > In Stephanie Dalley's edition of 474 tablets from the Schøyen
              > > Collection
              > > (CUSAS Vol. 9, CDL Press, 2009), she identifies two Akkadian names,
              > > ÌR-ia-ú
              > > (Arad-Yau), and ì-lí-ia-ú (Ili-Yau) whose second part is the West
              > > Semitic
              > > divine name Yau. At this time (16th century) Yau/Yahweh "would be
              > > god of
              > > Midian and Edom ... which one may connect with MBA/LBA cities at
              > > Qurayya ...
              > > and Tayma ... It may perhaps be deduced that there was a south-
              > > western god
              > > Yau who became assimilated into Babylonia at this period, perhaps 
              > as a
              > > hypostasis of the storm god Adad, so that the divine name was used
              > > with
              > > Akkadian elements ..." (Dalley, p. 72). Yau is also attested in a
              > > (later)
              > > Kassite name from Nippur.
              > >
              > > Best wishes,
              > > Bjarte Kaldhol
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • driver40386
              To be fair, using that same argument we could say the Hyksos never fled across northern Sinai (no evidence). Numerous Egyptian armies are supposed to have
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 28, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                To be fair, using that same argument we could say the Hyksos never fled across northern Sinai (no evidence). Numerous Egyptian armies are supposed to have passed that way, even before Seti's 'Way Stations' (but, no evidence). All the Assyrians, Greeks, Romans, all must have made periodic camps, afterall its a nine day journey, but where's the evidence?
                Nomadic peoples tend to be more traditional and take care when living in or from the natural world. Nomads, when breaking camp did, and still do, clean up the area to leave no trace of their passing.
                We might think we invented the three R's (Reduce, Re-use, & Recycle), but the ancient have been practicing the three R's from time immemorial.
                Something the modern world could do with emulating..

                All the best, Jon Smyth
                Toronto, CAN.


                --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, David Hall <dqhall59@...> wrote:
                >
                > Brian,
                >
                > What makes you think Har Karkom is the "true Mount Horeb/Sinai?"  This place in the southern Negev is quite desolate.  Parts of the Negev from Beersheeba to the south were found to contain EB settlements, but not LBA settlements, except for the Egyptian mining areas north of Eilat at Timnah Park. Studies of the Sinai did not find much in terms of LBA remains except along the northern coastal road named "The Way of Horus," and at the turquiose mines in the south at Serabit al-Khadem.
              • Bjarte Kaldhol
                Dear list, The third name with Yau in the Sealand archive edited by Dalley in CUSAS Vol. 9, turns out to be an Akkadian name, Yau-bani, from Kassite Nippur. So
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 30, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dear list,

                  The third name with Yau in the Sealand archive edited by Dalley in CUSAS
                  Vol. 9, turns out to be an Akkadian name, Yau-bani, from Kassite Nippur. So
                  we have now three Akkadian names that may attest to a knowledge of Yau (or
                  Yaw?) in Babylonia in the 16th century BC. Among other interesting gods in
                  this archive are:

                  (dingir) Amurru in the first or second part of many personal names
                  Anzak (associated with Magan) in five PN
                  Belluki (in an Elamite name)
                  Harbat (written -BA-AT!) as well as Harbe (HAR.BE)
                  Igi$ta
                  Lahura$er
                  Manzât
                  Nazi
                  Ningir (Kassite)
                  PAP.PAP.MU$EN
                  Sah
                  Te$$ib (sic! In PN Te$$ibewri, written TE $I BI IB RI)

                  Among kings mentioned in year formulae are
                  A.A-DARA3-GALAM.MA
                  PE$.GAL -DARA3.ME$
                  (both bore Sumerian names)

                  Place names of interest:
                  Dûr-Amurru (?)
                  Dûr-Enlile (not far from Nippur)
                  Dûr-Ninurta (in the vicinity of Nippur, it has a kâru)
                  E2-ka$$i
                  E$nunna (i$nukki, boats from there are mentioned)
                  Larsa
                  Quppat-Nikkal
                  Udâni (= Udannu?, west of Nippur)
                  Uruk
                  Many place names beginning with Kar-.

                  Dalley concludes from the place names that "a provenance for the archive
                  near Nippur is more likely than farther south" (p. 9).

                  An interesting greeting formula in letters: ana dinân bêlija anâku lullik.

                  One text (MS 2200/7) mentions thirty wooden writing boards: "30 GI$.DA.HI.A
                  itti$unu".

                  On the edge of four tablets there are alphabetic inscriptions. A photo of
                  two of them are found on plate 175.

                  Best wishes,
                  Bjarte Kaldhol
                  Oslo



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • victor avigdor hurowitz
                  Have a look at R. Zadok, The Earliest Diaspora: Israelites adn Judeans in Pre-hellenistic Mesopotamian Tel Aviv 2002 p. 14 where he has some new names with
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 3, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Have a look at R. Zadok, The Earliest Diaspora: Israelites adn Judeans in
                    Pre-hellenistic Mesopotamian Tel Aviv 2002 p. 14 where he has some new
                    names with (d)ia-a-hu-u' where previous only spellings with <-ma>
                    (/w/) were known.
                    Victor Hurowitz
                    BGU



                    On Wed, 27 Jan 2010, Rolf Furuli wrote:

                    > Dear Bjarte,
                    >
                    > There is a question whether the ia-ú element is
                    > related to the YHWH/YHW found in Tanakh and
                    > Elephantine papyri. (BTW, Yahweh is an artificial
                    > form which has no support in ancient Hebrew
                    > manuscripts whatsoever-but there are reasons to
                    > believe that the name had three syllables and not
                    > only two.)
                    >
                    > R. Zadok. 1979. "The Jews in Babylonia during the
                    > Chaldean and Achaemenid Periods," pp. 14-16 has
                    > the following correspondences between Akkadian
                    > and Hebrew names:
                    >
                    > +u-ib-ia-a-ma - +obiyyahu
                    >
                    > za-ka-a-ri-'a-a-ma - Zwkaryahu
                    >
                    > Ga-da-al-ia-a-ma - Gedalyahu
                    >
                    > d ia-ku-ú-ki-nu and ia )u.ia-)-kin7, and Ia-)-ú-kin7-Jehoyyakin
                    >
                    > d ia-hu-ú-na-ta-nu-yahonatan.
                    >
                    > The divine element YHW is spelled differently in
                    > Akkadian in initial and final position, and the
                    > same is true in the Tanakh. I would like to hear
                    > the opinions of the list-members as to the
                    > relationship between the Hebrew -yahu and the
                    > Akkadian -a-ma.
                    >
                    >
                    > Best regards,
                    >
                    > Rolf Furuli
                    > University of Oslo
                    >
                    > (Bjarte and I both belong to the "Friday-club" at
                    > the University of Oslo, who for many years have
                    > come together every Friday to read cuneiform
                    > tablets and ancient manuscripts.)
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > >Dear list,
                    > >In Stephanie Dalley's edition of 474 tablets from the Schøyen Collection
                    > >(CUSAS Vol. 9, CDL Press, 2009), she identifies two Akkadian names, ÌR-ia-ú
                    > >(Arad-Yau), and ì-lí-ia-ú (Ili-Yau) whose second part is the West Semitic
                    > >divine name Yau. At this time (16th century) Yau/Yahweh "would be god of
                    > >Midian and Edom ... which one may connect with MBA/LBA cities at Qurayya ...
                    > >and Tayma ... It may perhaps be deduced that there was a south-western god
                    > >Yau who became assimilated into Babylonia at this period, perhaps as a
                    > >hypostasis of the storm god Adad, so that the divine name was used with
                    > >Akkadian elements ..." (Dalley, p. 72). Yau is also attested in a (later)
                    > >Kassite name from Nippur.
                    > >
                    > >Best wishes,
                    > >Bjarte Kaldhol
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >------------------------------------
                    > >
                    > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.