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University of Haifa: Most ancient Hebrew biblical inscription deciphered

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  • Joseph I. Lauer
    EurekAlert! and other sources have published a University of Haifa press release concerning the deciphering of the Elah Fortress/Khirbet Qeiyafa inscription by
    Message 1 of 62 , Jan 7, 2010
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      EurekAlert! and other sources have published a University of Haifa press
      release concerning the deciphering of the Elah Fortress/Khirbet Qeiyafa
      inscription by Prof. Gershon Galil.
      The press release, entitled "Most ancient Hebrew biblical inscription
      deciphered", has not yet been posted at the university's website.
      It may be read at
      http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-01/uoh-mah010710.php
      According to EurekAlert!, the English translation of the deciphered text
      is:
      1' you shall not do [it], but worship the [Lord].
      2' Judge the sla[ve] and the wid[ow] / Judge the orph[an]
      3' [and] the stranger. [Pl]ead for the infant / plead for the po[or and]
      4' the widow. Rehabilitate [the poor] at the hands of the king.
      5' Protect the po[or and] the slave / [supp]ort the stranger.
      The release begins: "Prof. Gershon Galil of the University of Haifa who
      deciphered the inscription: 'It indicates that the Kingdom of Israel already
      existed in the 10th century BCE and that at least some of the biblical texts
      were written hundreds of years before the dates presented in current
      research.'"
      The release ends with the following: "The contents of the text express
      social sensitivity to the fragile position of weaker members of society. The
      inscription testifies to the presence of strangers within the Israeli
      society as far back as this ancient period, and calls to provide support for
      these strangers. It appeals to care for the widows and orphans and that the
      king - who at that time had the responsibility of curbing social
      inequality - be involved. This inscription is similar in its content to
      biblical scriptures (Isaiah 1:17, Psalms 72:3, Exodus 23:3, and others), but
      it is clear that it is not copied from any biblical text."
      Other sites with the release include:
      http://www.physorg.com/news182101034.html
      http://www.scienceblog.com/cms/most-ancient-hebrew-biblical-inscription-deciphered-28989.html
      http://www.sciencecodex.com/most_ancient_hebrew_biblical_inscription_deciphered
      http://esciencenews.com/articles/2010/01/07/most.ancient.hebrew.biblical.inscription.deciphered
      A brief AFP article on the subject ("Archaeologists claim discovery of
      oldest Hebrew writing") may be read at
      http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gM9Vz_GRfzYuxCKUq0wGzBBZAg2Q
      Joseph I. Lauer
      Brooklyn, New York
    • Michael Brass
      ... There are short film clips of Sir Henry Wellcome s 1911-14 excavations at the famous site Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan, which I am re-examining. The
      Message 62 of 62 , Mar 15, 2012
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        > 1.1. Reflections on the EES Excavations at Amarna
        >    Posted by: "Brian" r.brianroberts@... r.brianroberts
        >    Date: Wed Mar 14, 2012 7:11 am ((PDT))
        >
        > I quite accidentally discovered a set of short videos on Youtube comprised of film shot during the 1930-1933 seasons at Amarna, under the Directorship of John Pendlebury. The first thing that occurred to me was how ahead of his time he was to realize the power of the moving image to enthrall the public back home! And secondly, it may be the first multimedia excavation ever (in their case, printed report and film).
        >
        > Does anyone on the list know if that's true?

        There are short film clips of Sir Henry Wellcome's 1911-14 excavations
        at the famous site Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan, which I am
        re-examining. The clips are available on the Wellcome Trust's website.

        Regards,
        Mike Brass
        University College London
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