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RE: [ANE-2] Origins of Judaism

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  • Lisbeth S. Fried
    Dear Robert, et. al., I m not sure that the so-called Passover papyrus was a response to a request for information about how to celebrate the Passover.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 6, 2010
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      Dear Robert, et. al.,

      I'm not sure that the so-called Passover papyrus was a response to a request
      for information about how to celebrate the Passover. According to the
      letter, something, some information, or something, was sent from king Darius
      to the Satrap Arsames. It is impossible to believe that the Judeans of Yeb
      would be asking Darius about how to observe Pesach.

      I think what we have here is official permission, authorization, to observe
      the holiday and to abstain from work on the first and last days. What is
      more interesting is what is not authorized in the letter, the sacrifice of
      the Pascal lamb. If one can imagine a situation where one's fellow
      degel-members were asking why you won't have a beer with them (the national
      drink), this letter would be helpful.



      Re: ethnicity. I would say that even tho the Judeans and the Arameans were
      in the same degel and spoke the same language, and were all classified as
      Arameans by Arameans and Egyptians, I would warrant that the non-Judean
      Arameans did not celebrate the Passover or the Feast of Unleavened Bread.



      Lisbeth S. Fried, Ph.D.

      Department of Near Eastern Studies

      and the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies

      University of Michigan

      202 S. Thayer -- Room 4111

      Ann Arbor, MI 48104

      www.lizfried.com <http://www.lizfried.com/>





      _____

      From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      featherrobert
      Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2010 6:31 AM
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [ANE-2] Origins of Judaism






      It is not so much that the Settlers at Yeb knew about Passover, but that
      they didn't know about the Exodus, or the Oral Laws. If anyone thinks
      otherwise they must show evidence. Asking for information on how they could
      celebrate the Passover, around 400 BCE, is pretty strong evidence they did
      not perform the ceremony previously. David Hall says that `the early
      Egyptians were polytheistic.. .', but that is not entirely true. There was a
      window of monotheism in the 18th Dynasty, which is well documented and
      attested by numerous Egyptologists, and first highlighted by Freud. The
      clues are all there.


      Robert Feather, London, Institute of Materials.





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