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Re: [ANE-2] Brief queries in reply to 'Two Qumran articles/a reply'

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  • Joe Zias
    Good question, logically you may be right however it s such a rare find that oens imply cannot answer with any certitude.Joe Joe Zias www.joezias.com
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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      Good question, logically you may be right however it's such a rare find that oens imply cannot answer with any certitude.Joe

      Joe Zias www.joezias.com
      Anthropology/Paleopathology

      Science and Antiquity Group - Jerusalem
      Jerusalem, Israel

      --- On Thu, 12/3/09, Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...> wrote:

      From: Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...>
      Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Brief queries in reply to 'Two Qumran articles/a reply'
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, December 3, 2009, 4:15 PM







       









      Joe, would the silver amulets found in chamber/tomb 25 at Ketef Hinnom have

      been an exception since they were a blessing?



      Jack



      Jack Kilmon

      San Antonio, TX



      ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --

      From: "Joe Zias" <joezias@yahoo. com>

      Sent: Wednesday, December 02, 2009 9:14 PM

      To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups. com>

      Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Brief queries in reply to 'Two Qumran articles/a reply'



      > David, the chances of finding gold in a Jewish grave is on par with

      > finding it in the street of Jerusalem, there is a Jewish law against the

      > destruction/ burial of wanton 'goods' which is why jewelery is seldom found

      > in Jewish graves as opposed to pagan ones. When it is found it usually

      > appears to be an ear ring, finger ring which may have been impossible to

      > remove without adding further destruction to the body. Those beads found

      > around the feet of the women should have been a 'dead giveaway' that the

      > graves were Bedouin. Never have they been found in anything but late

      > Bedouin burials. Unfortunately due to the haredim it's near impossible to

      > get good data anymore on human burials. As for the c-14 dates which

      > Feather speaks about, I was given privy to the data as they were not

      > refusing to put it out, so I did it for them :-) They then, replied that

      > the c-14 dates were from the Turking periond but tried to explain it away

      > by saying the excavators

      > mistakenly sent wrapping materials (sic) to run the tests. I replied 3-400

      > year old wrapping materialy just lying around ? They did not reply,

      > probably didn't have a sense of humor, however the c-14 dates of the women

      > and children are from the Turkish period, Bedouin recycle cemeteries all

      > the time. The orig. German publication was riddled with errors which made

      > it so easy for us to know immed. that the crania were Bedouin as the

      > children which were buried there were 100 % complete whereas they are

      > always under normal conditions to be, egg shell thick, the first to go

      > everything being equal.

      >

      >

      >

      > Joe Zias www.joezias. com

      > Anthropology/ Paleopathology

      >

      > Science and Antiquity Group - Jerusalem

      > Jerusalem, Israel
























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