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Re: Brief queries in reply to 'Two Qumran articles/a reply'

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  • dastacey62
    There are also no Turkish settlements at Qumran. The area would certainly have been exploited by semi-nomadic people throughout history and, as we know very
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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      There are also no Turkish settlements at Qumran. The area would certainly have been exploited by semi-nomadic people throughout history and, as we know very little about the burial habits of the poor, of nomads and of slaves, it is a dangerous assumption that ALL the non-bedouin graves at Qumran are 'Essene'.
      David Stacey
      UK

      --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Joe Zias <joezias@...> wrote:
      >
      > As there are no late Roman nor Byzantine settlements at Qumran it's hard to visualize that until the Turkish period that anyone was living, or burying there. True there are Islamic burials here and there not mentioned in the literature, if one walks the region one can find them, in fact I believe that the Qumran cemetery goes a bit further north than what is realized. Iron Age people burying in the same way as the Essenes, hard to believe
      >
      >
      >
      > Joe Zias www.joezias.com
      > Anthropology/Paleopathology
      >
      > Science and Antiquity Group - Jerusalem
      > Jerusalem, Israel
      >
    • Joe Zias
      Good question, logically you may be right however it s such a rare find that oens imply cannot answer with any certitude.Joe Joe Zias www.joezias.com
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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        Good question, logically you may be right however it's such a rare find that oens imply cannot answer with any certitude.Joe

        Joe Zias www.joezias.com
        Anthropology/Paleopathology

        Science and Antiquity Group - Jerusalem
        Jerusalem, Israel

        --- On Thu, 12/3/09, Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...> wrote:

        From: Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...>
        Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Brief queries in reply to 'Two Qumran articles/a reply'
        To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, December 3, 2009, 4:15 PM







         









        Joe, would the silver amulets found in chamber/tomb 25 at Ketef Hinnom have

        been an exception since they were a blessing?



        Jack



        Jack Kilmon

        San Antonio, TX



        ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --

        From: "Joe Zias" <joezias@yahoo. com>

        Sent: Wednesday, December 02, 2009 9:14 PM

        To: <ANE-2@yahoogroups. com>

        Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Brief queries in reply to 'Two Qumran articles/a reply'



        > David, the chances of finding gold in a Jewish grave is on par with

        > finding it in the street of Jerusalem, there is a Jewish law against the

        > destruction/ burial of wanton 'goods' which is why jewelery is seldom found

        > in Jewish graves as opposed to pagan ones. When it is found it usually

        > appears to be an ear ring, finger ring which may have been impossible to

        > remove without adding further destruction to the body. Those beads found

        > around the feet of the women should have been a 'dead giveaway' that the

        > graves were Bedouin. Never have they been found in anything but late

        > Bedouin burials. Unfortunately due to the haredim it's near impossible to

        > get good data anymore on human burials. As for the c-14 dates which

        > Feather speaks about, I was given privy to the data as they were not

        > refusing to put it out, so I did it for them :-) They then, replied that

        > the c-14 dates were from the Turking periond but tried to explain it away

        > by saying the excavators

        > mistakenly sent wrapping materials (sic) to run the tests. I replied 3-400

        > year old wrapping materialy just lying around ? They did not reply,

        > probably didn't have a sense of humor, however the c-14 dates of the women

        > and children are from the Turkish period, Bedouin recycle cemeteries all

        > the time. The orig. German publication was riddled with errors which made

        > it so easy for us to know immed. that the crania were Bedouin as the

        > children which were buried there were 100 % complete whereas they are

        > always under normal conditions to be, egg shell thick, the first to go

        > everything being equal.

        >

        >

        >

        > Joe Zias www.joezias. com

        > Anthropology/ Paleopathology

        >

        > Science and Antiquity Group - Jerusalem

        > Jerusalem, Israel
























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