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Minor Talk, Inlays and Identities in Nubian Burials, Wednesday December 9th, 2009 4 PM

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  • jeanjzli@berkeley.edu
    Wednesday December 9, 2009 4 pm 254 Barrows Hall Inlays and Identities in Nubian Burials of the Classic Kerma Period Talk by Elizabeth Minor, Graduate
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 2009
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      Wednesday December 9, 2009 4 pm 254 Barrows Hall

      Inlays and Identities in Nubian Burials of the Classic Kerma Period

      Talk by Elizabeth Minor, Graduate Student in Egyptology, Department of
      Near Eastern Studies

      Discussants:

      Dr. John Hayes, Lecturer in Arabic and Comparative Semitics, Department of
      Near Eastern Studies

      Randall Souza, Graduate Student, Ancient History and Mediterranean
      Archaeology.

      ***************************************************************************************************
      Inlays and Identities in Nubian Burials of the Classic Kerma Period

      The inlaid and appliquéd animal figures found on Classic Kerma grave goods
      provide a potential case study for the discussion of social imaginaries.
      During the Classic Kerma period (1700-1550 B.C.E.), the community at Kerma
      was in a state of rapid flux. The Nubian ruler undertook a program of
      offensive territorial expansion into formerly Egyptian controlled regions
      to the north. A wealth of Egyptian imports from these expeditions was
      brought back to Kerma and came to be owned by the ruler and elites alike.
      At the same time, local craftsmen began to incorporate Egyptian motifs
      into indigenous funerary art. The ivory inlays on funerary beds and mica
      appliqués on leather hats worn by the dead demonstrate this mix of local
      and foreign motifs. The fauna of the Nubian environment are found in the
      greatest numbers and variety, interspersed with symbolic Egyptian animals.
      Although the local mythology surrounding these iconic animals is unknown,
      trends in the motifs can be followed over four generations. Only an
      increasingly elite selection of the community were buried with these
      highly personalized burial goods, with each generation exploring new
      varieties and combinations of motifs. A closer investigation of the
      Kerman elite’s creative design process can give insight on how they
      imagined themselves, defining and refining their status in a volatile
      political milieu.

      ***************************************************************************************************

      This lecture is the part of the Memory and Identity Working Group
      lecture series.

      Memory and Identity Working Group meetings are designed to encourage
      dialogue across the department's diverse traditions.


      Event Contact: Benjamin Porter, Assistant Professor of Near Eastern
      Archaeology, Department of Near Eastern Studies,
      bwporter@..., 510-642-7794, or visit http://berkeleymemoryid.com/



      Jean Li, C.Phil.
      Egyptian Art and Archaeology, Department of Near Eastern Studies
      University of California, Berkeley
      jeanjzli@...






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