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Dieleman talk Nov. 4th, 4 PM: Elite Egyptian burial and self-presentation in Ptolemaic Egypt

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  • jeanjzli@berkeley.edu
    ******************************************************************* Wednesday November 4th, 2009 4 pm 254 Barrows Hall Elite Egyptian burial and
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 29, 2009
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      Wednesday November 4th, 2009 4 pm 254 Barrows Hall

      Elite Egyptian burial and self-presentation in Ptolemaic Egypt

      Lecture by Professor Jacco Dieleman, Assistant Professor of Egyptology,
      Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA

      Discussants:

      Stephanie Langin-Hooper, Graduate Student, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies

      Jean Li, Graduate Student, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies


      Abstract: In the Hellenistic Period, Egypt was home to an ethnically mixed
      population. Indigenous Egyptians formed a large majority, but by now they
      shared the land with a considerable number of settlers from abroad. Among
      these settlers, Greeks formed the largest and most
      important minority group, ruling the country since the conquest by
      Alexander the Great in 332 BCE and the subsequent establishment of
      Ptolemaic rule. This influx of Greeks resulted in the coexistence of two
      spheres of life in Egyptian society, i.e. Greek and Egyptian,
      distinguished on the basis of language, cultural practices, and legal
      status. The Greek sphere was associated with government and social
      mobility, the Egyptian sphere with indigenous culture. In the course of
      the Ptolemaic period, more and more individuals were willing to, and
      capable of, partaking in both of these spheres of life. This aspect of
      Ptolemaic society is most insightfully exemplified by the practice of an
      individual carrying both an Egyptian and a Greek name, and using one over
      the other depending on the situation. But how did this aspect play out in
      death? Did one choose to be buried and commemorated in Greek or Egyptian
      fashion? This paper will review three cases of elite
      self-presentation on funerary monuments in which the deceased poses as
      both Egyptian and Greek in text and/or image. What does this say about the
      ethnic and cultural identity of these individuals? And what kind of social
      imaginary or imagined community underlies these constructions of identity?


      This lecture is the part of the Memory and Identity Working Group
      lecture series.

      Memory and Identity Working Group meetings are designed to encourage
      dialogue across the department's diverse traditions.


      Event Contact: Benjamin Porter, Assistant Professor of Near Eastern
      Archaeology, Department of Near Eastern Studies,
      bwporter@..., 510-642-7794, or visit http://berkeleymemoryid.com/







      Jean Li, C.Phil.
      Egyptian Art and Archaeology, Department of Near Eastern Studies
      University of California, Berkeley
      jeanjzli@...
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