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Persian period in the hill country

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  • Sam WOLFF
    Part of the confusion in the archaeological record of the Persian period is that archaeologists working in Israel and administered territories have a difficult
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 9, 2009
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      Part of the confusion in the archaeological record of the Persian period is that archaeologists working in Israel and administered territories have a difficult time distinguishing pottery from the end of the Iron Age from that of the early Persian period, especially in the hill country, an area that lacks Greek imports, for the most part, those pots that often provide us with reasonably absolute dates. Can one differentiate between a 7th/end of 6th c. site and a 6th, or even sometimes a 5th c. site in the hill country? The answer is, its not easy. Thus, when observing survey data and even excavation data, one has to be careful jumping to conclusions about whether the region/site was occupied or not after the fall of Jerusalem. And to be careful about historical conclusions based on such data.

      Sam Wolff
      Jerusalem


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    • Lisbeth S. Fried
      Hi Sam, I discuss the problem of dating Persian and neo-Babylonian pottery in my review, which appeared recently in JAOS, of Oded Lipschits excellent book. A
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 9, 2009
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        Hi Sam,

        I discuss the problem of dating Persian and neo-Babylonian pottery in my
        review, which appeared recently in JAOS, of Oded Lipschits' excellent book.
        A problem in my opinion arises from the Lapps' study of Tel el Ful. I think
        their analysis of the pottery there is very problematic, yet it seems that
        subsequent archaeologists have based their dating on this site, perpetuating
        confusion.

        I'd like to see the Lapps' work completely re-evaluated.

        Liz Fried

        Ann Arbor, currently enjoying sunny Jerusalem.



        _____

        From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sam
        WOLFF
        Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2009 11:09 AM
        To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [ANE-2] Persian period in the hill country





        Part of the confusion in the archaeological record of the Persian period is
        that archaeologists working in Israel and administered territories have a
        difficult time distinguishing pottery from the end of the Iron Age from that
        of the early Persian period, especially in the hill country, an area that
        lacks Greek imports, for the most part, those pots that often provide us
        with reasonably absolute dates. Can one differentiate between a 7th/end of
        6th c. site and a 6th, or even sometimes a 5th c. site in the hill country?
        The answer is, its not easy. Thus, when observing survey data and even
        excavation data, one has to be careful jumping to conclusions about whether
        the region/site was occupied or not after the fall of Jerusalem. And to be
        careful about historical conclusions based on such data.

        Sam Wolff
        Jerusalem


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        PineApp Mail-SeCure for the presence of malicious code, vandals & computer
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      • Sam WOLFF
        Now we have Nancy Lapp s Shechem IV: The Persian-Hellenistic Pottery of Shechem/Tell Balatah (Eisenbrauns 2008). Not exactly groundbreaking work, but nice to
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 9, 2009
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          Now we have Nancy Lapp's Shechem IV: The Persian-Hellenistic Pottery of Shechem/Tell Balatah (Eisenbrauns 2008). Not exactly groundbreaking work, but nice to have.

          Sam Wolff

          Liz Fried wrote: I'd like to see the Lapps' work completely re-evaluated.



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