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  • Jan Tavernier
    Dear All, having had problems with my mail, I do not know if my previous mail to the groupo has well arrived. Here it is again. Sorry for any inconvenience.
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 5, 2009
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      Dear All,

      having had problems with my mail, I do not know if my previous mail to the groupo has well arrived. Here it is again. Sorry for any inconvenience.

      Just to notice that Babylonian fragments of the Bisitun Inscription of Darius have been found in Babylon.
      See E. von Voigtlander, The Bisitun Inscription of Darius the Great: Babylonian Version (Corpus Inscriptionum Iranicarum 1/2/1), London, 1978, pp. 63-66.

      Cordially,
      Jan Tavernier

      ________________________________
      Van: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] namens Clark Whelton [cwhelton@...]
      Verzonden: woensdag 5 augustus 2009 7:26
      Aan: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Onderwerp: [ANE-2] Persia, Egypt, Babylon



      Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Persia, Egypt, Babylon

      >>>>>>>>>This thread has been going on for several days now. In what way
      >>>>>>>>>has Mr.
      Whelton's question not been thoroughly answered by those who have responded
      to it? "What's wrong with this picture?" Mr. Whelton still insists on
      asking. So I
      think it's time for Mr. Whelton to tell us, finally, what his own opinions
      are on this topic.
      David Lorton

      David Lorton sees nothing wrong with a picture of 1st millennium BCE
      Mesopotamia in which material evidence for the Medes and Chaldeans -- two of
      the most celebrated nations in Greek historiography -- is totally missing.
      He sees nothing wrong with a picture of the empire Persians in which Darius
      leaves behind "abundant and varied" (Briant) evidence of his rule in Egypt,
      while in Babylon -- a city where Darius held court and which served as a de
      facto capital of the Persian Empire -- there is a "painful" (Briant) absence
      of such evidence. Apparently no one on ANE sees anything wrong with the
      picture of Darius the lawgiver reforming legal codes in Egypt, but not in
      Babylon. No one sees a problem with Darius leaving inscriptions in
      Babylonian at Behistun, but not in Babylonia.

      I don't claim to know the answers. This is a complex puzzle and I've
      changed my views on the subject several times. If I had to bet, I'd say the
      problem stems from an inflated chronology that gave rise to dark ages,
      intermediate periods and ad hoc explanations for missing evidence. Whatever
      the cause, the Medes and Chaldeans cling to a fragile existence as literary
      creations. If not for Greek and Biblical texts, big chunks of the 1st
      millennium -- including much of the Achaemenid Empire -- would have been
      engulfed by dark ages.

      Clark Whelton
      New York


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