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Origins of the Book of Kings

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  • David Hall
    I am a baffled by the discussion of the Bible perhaps being written in Hellenistic times as the sources predated Hellenistic times and were extensive.  If
    Message 1 of 67 , Jun 27, 2009
      I am a baffled by the discussion of the Bible perhaps being written in Hellenistic times as the sources predated Hellenistic times and were extensive.  If there was no return from the exile, how can one explain the book of Maccabees and the synagogues, mikvehs, incense shovels, Dead Sea scrolls etc. of the Herodian times, unless a remnant of Jews not taken into captivity was keeping the home fires burning until in 1948 more Iraqi Jews returned to Israel.  Josephus reported caravans of thousands of Jews from Babylon leaving Babylon before the Passover for pilgrimages to Jerusalem on an annual basis.   
       
      As for the book of Kings there are historical records of the Assyrians to verify later portions of the book.  The records of Shoshenq for an earlier portion.  The Lachish ostraca for the reign of Hezekiah.  A seal of Jeroboam found at Megiddo.  A Jotham signet ring found at Eilat during the last season of the Nelson Glueck excavations funded in part by the Smithsonian Institute of Washington D.C.  Excavations in Samaria by Reisner of Harvard University revealed Ahab's palace with fragments of numerous ivory carvings in situ confirming a Biblical description of Ahab's Ivory palace.  There was a vase found in the palace with an inscription of the name of a contemporary Egyptian pharaoh.  I am sure I could not write all the evidence for the book of Kings in so small a writing as this.  This history may have been compiled from a more extensive group of sources.
       
      The historical records could not have been a complete fabrication, nor be cut off from a Hebrew organization capable of keeping records in spite of reports of them suffering much adversity through the ages. 
       
      David Q. Hall  . 
       
       
       
       




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    • RUSSELLGMIRKIN@aol.com
      The episodes you mention predate the Babylonian Chronicles and do not involve the Mesopotamian empires. Russell Gmirkin There may be historical material in
      Message 67 of 67 , Jul 17 7:34 AM
        The episodes you mention predate the Babylonian Chronicles and do not
        involve the Mesopotamian empires.

        Russell Gmirkin

        There may be historical material in Kings not derived from the Babylonian
        chronicles.

        Ahab was described as going to fight the King of Aram in Ramath Gilead
        east of the Jordan River (Ramath Gilead was supposed to be the birthplace of
        Elijah the Tishbite). This would have been near the land of the Moabites.
        Ahab was killed in the battle.

        The Moabite stela claimed Mesha killed the son of Omri and took land from
        Israel. Mesha of Moab may have sided with Aram at Ramath Gilead and used
        the Aramaen victory to temporarily displace Israel as claimed in his stela.

        2Kings 1:1 After Ahab's death, Moab rebelled against Israel.

        In Kings 3 Israel claimed Mesha and Moab who used to be subservient had
        rebelled and afterward Israel entered Moab with a large force attacking from
        the direction of Edom to the south instead of Aram to the north put down
        the rebellion.

        Was this history in Kings II not from Berossus?

        David Q. Hall




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