Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Re: [ANE-2] Parpola & the Assyrian Tree

Expand Messages
  • victor@bgumail.bgu.ac.il
    There is no tree in Adapa. That is clear. I didn t say there was. I was just pointing out what might be a parallel motif, and especially because Thomas asked
    Message 1 of 19 , Apr 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      There is no tree in Adapa. That is clear. I didn't say there was. I was just pointing out what might be a parallel motif, and especially because Thomas asked about a Tree of Death.
      Victor Hurowitz
      Dept. of Bible Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies
      Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
      Beer-Sheva, Israel
      >
      > From: walter mattfeld <mattfeld12@...>
      > Date: 2006/04/05 ד PM 10:08:10 GMT+05:30
      > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Parpola & the Assyrian Tree
      >
      > Dear Victor,
      >
      > But "where" is there any mention of a _tree_ in the Adapa myth ? Adapa is offered "bread of life" by Anu, but Enki lead Adapa into believing he would be offered the "bread of death".
      >
      > Your mention of the Adapa Legend is relevent. As many on this list are aware the Myth of Adapa and the South Wind is understood to be a Mesopotamian explanation of how, _once upon a time_, man had a chance to obtain immortality by eating the "bread of life" and drinking the "water of life" offered by Anu. Some scholars have suggested the notion that man can obtain immortality _via eating something_, resonates "somewhat" with the Eden scenario, a fruit if eaten bestowing immortality. I am in agreement with these scholars that Genesis is recasting the Mesopotamian myths about how man came to be made and why his demise was sought in a universal flood. This recasting being understood as a "challenge" or "_disavowal_" of the Mesopotamian concepts.
      >
      > If, as some have suggested, Adapa and the South Wind myth has been recast in Genesis, Adapa being understood to be a prototype of Adam, where is the serpent, the two trees, and the woman ? My research suggests several different Mesopotamian myths lie behind the Eden story. I understand Adam is a recast of Adapa, Enkidu, Enki, and Utnapishtim. Eve is a recast of Nin-ti ("Lady of the rib"), Ninhursag, Utnapishtim's wife, and Shamhat. The Edenic serpent is a recast of Dumuzi (Tammuz), Ningishzida, and Enki. The Garden of Eden is a recast of Dilmun, Eridu, Nippur, Humbaba's Cedar mountain, and the Eridu Genesis Myth (naked man wandering a wilderness steppe with animals for companions instead of gods and knowing no fear from these beasts).
      >
      > For me, Genesis is _denying_ the Mesopotamian myths' explanation of how and why man came to made, what his purpose on earth is, and why his demise was sought in a flood. This "_denial_" -is for me- accomplished by taking the Mesopotamian motifs from a varety of myths and giving them a number of "new twists" by changing the names of the characters, the locations, and sequences of events. If interested in this Secular Humanist approach cf. the following urls:
      >
      > The Tree of Knowledge (Its Mesopotamian Prototypes)
      > http://www.bibleorigins.net/EdensTreeofKnowledgeLife.html
      >
      > Why a Naked Adam in Eden ? (Eden is Eridu & Nippur & Edin)
      > http://www.bibleorigins.net/EdenDatePalmGardenIraqHrouda.html
      >
      > Genesis' Genesis (The Hebrews' Recasting of Mesopotamian Creation Myths on Man)
      > http://www.bibleorigins.net/genesisgenesis.html
      >
      > The Mesopotamian Prototypes behind Eden's Serpent
      > http://www.bibleorigins.net/ningishzida.html
      >
      > The Sabbath's Origins (The sebittu day, 7th day, when ALL the Mesopotamian gods rested)
      > http://www.bibleorigins.net/sabbathorigins.html
      >
      > Regards, Walter
      > Walter Reinhold arttig Mattfeld y de la Torre, M.A. Ed.
      > mattfeld12@...
      > www.bibleorigins.net
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.