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Re: parchment vs. leather Re: [ANE-2] dams, ink, and parchment

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  • David Hall
    Yes, but apparently the process changed/improved:   The usual method involved soaking the hide in water, to which were added calcium (Ca(oh) 2 ) or flour (to
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 4, 2009
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      Yes, but apparently the process changed/improved:
       
      "The usual method involved soaking the hide in water, to which were added calcium (Ca(oh) 2 ) or flour (to cause fermentation) and salt. An addition of tannin, made of oak-gall, produced an irreversible chemical reaction that strengthened the product. In the process, some used dates, while others used dog-dung - though not all the Jewish sages favored the latter. The raw skins were treated in different processes which led to a variety of the final product and to the different names, such as diphtera, gewil, and so forth."
       
      In the desert different plants may have been used for tannic acid.  I had studied cultural anthropology of the Bedouin and also travelogues of 19th century explorers to the area of the ANE deserts i.e. Charles Doughty.  A primative method is to find the hollow stump of a tree and soal water in it and use the water to tan, another is to boil plant parts in water to get the tannic acid. 
       
      You might recall Peter stayed in Joppa as the guest of a tanner.  The odors of a tannery were such that the site may have been located down-wind of the wealthier areas.   
       
      David Q. Hall

      --- On Tue, 3/3/09, Peter T. Daniels <grammatim@...> wrote:

      From: Peter T. Daniels <grammatim@...>
      Subject: parchment vs. leather Re: [ANE-2] dams, ink, and parchment
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 4:34 PM






      The page you referenced clearly states:

      "A material called parchment, first mentioned in 301 BCE, is assumed to have been prepared by the people of Pergamon. The preparation was without tanning, so that the skin dried while being stretched. The final product was thin and very delicate."�
      --
      Peter T. Daniels grammatim@verizon. net
      ____________ _________ _________ __
      From: David Hall <dqhall59@yahoo. com>
      To: ANE <ane-2@yahoogroups. com>
      Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2009 2:03:10 PM
      Subject: [ANE-2] dams, ink, and parchment

      Parchement and leather were both cured with tannic acid. Some plants known to the Bedouin of old were better for tanning than others. The tanning preserved the hides and prevented rotting.

      Parchement technology: Graeco-Roman and Jewish

      http://faculty. biu.ac.il/ ~barilm/parchmen .html


















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