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9879Re: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in Ancient Egypt & Narmer - & N Palette names a king called Pepy!

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  • Doug Weller
    Feb 11, 2009
      Hi Brian,

      High resolution photos of the Narmer palette here (a link from the
      Wikipedia article)
      http://xoomer.virgilio.it/francescoraf/hesyra/palettes/narmerp.htm

      And the Wikipedia article now claims that

      In the third register at the bottom of the palette we have a king
      named PPP (Pepy) with a bull known as Montu commonly used in the kings
      titulary [16] building a city with the power of Montu. [Based it says on p.72 of Gardiner's Egyptian Grammar.

      DOug


      Wednesday, February 11, 2009, 12:11:42 PM, you wrote:


      > On 10/02/2009, at 5:31 AM, Trudy Kawami wrote:
      >> Are you talking about the Horus on the obverse? He holds a tether to
      >> the
      >> nose of the Delta rebel.
      >>

      > You are right, Trudy.
      > I have always seen it as cord, until this idea was put into my head
      > yesterday.

      > Once again I have been prompted to put my own little piece about the
      > palette on the internet, in the ancient Egypt section of

      > http://collesseum.googlepages.com/

      > It ends thus (with an idea that came into my head about MENES):

      > Was Narmer the King Menes who (according to the priests of Memphis, as
      > reported by the Greek historian Herodotos, 5th C. B.C.E.) was the
      > first king of Egypt and the founder of Memphis.

      > Here is a thought I have had: If we read the chisel sign in the name
      > "catfish chisel" (nar mer) not as mer but as menh (menkh) "chisel",
      > and note that the Greeks used to omit h (kh) in such foreign (Hebrew)
      > names as Menahem (Greek Menaem) and Nehemyah (Greek Neemia), then
      > Greek Menes could be Egyptian Menkh, and this palette could be the
      > record of the founding of the First Dynasty of United Egypt.

      > However, it should be noted that there is another candidate with a
      > claim to be the legendary King Menes. An ivory label found at Naqada
      > (near Thebes) has a sign men beside the name 'Aha, thought to be the
      > successor of Narmer. No tomb has been found for King Narmer at Saqqara
      > (the royal burial place near Memphis) ; the oldest-known tomb there
      > belongs to 'Aha. Was Narmer only the forerunner of 'Aha, and 'Aha the
      > builder of Memphis and the founder of the First Dynasty (around 3000
      > B.C.E.)?

      > http://collesseum.googlepages.com/narmer

      > Your other question:
      > Is the throw-stick ever shown in a "combat" rather than hunting scene
      > (usually the fowling in the marshes motif)?

      > I don't know (but apparently not), and I think the Australian
      > boomerang was used for hunting animals for food, and not for fighting.

      > Brian Colless
      > Massey U, NZ
      >> Just curious.
      >>
      >> Trudy Kawami
      >>
      > (Kawami: Polynesian? Japanese? Hawaiian-Japanese?)
      >>
      >> ______________________________
      >> From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      >> Of
      >> Brian Colless
      >> Sent: Sunday, February 08, 2009 10:48 PM
      >> To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      >> Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in ANE, AE (Ancient Egypt) trade etc.
      >>
      >> Yes, I went to
      >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_
      >> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_> (hieroglyph)
      >> (but I had to do a search to get through to it, as the bit in round
      >> brackets did not register, did not light up in blue)
      >>
      >> The word ga, 'throw-stick' is offered in a little box; interesting;
      >> It was already saying G before it was borrowed for the proto-alphabet?
      >>
      >> One surprise for me was on the Narmer Palette (which I have studied
      >> very closely in the past): the Horus Hawk is holding one; the King is
      >> wielding a 'donger' (club) to smash skulls.
      >>
      >> The alleged 'birthing wand' is a puzzle to me.
      >>
      >> Brian Colless
      >> Massey U, NZ
      >>
      >>
      >> ,___



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      --
      --
      Doug Weller Moderator, sci.archaeology.moderated
      Director and Moderator The Hall of Ma'at http://www.hallofmaat.com
      Doug's Skeptical Archaeology Site: http://www.ramtops.co.uk
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