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9857Re: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in ANE, AE (Ancient Egypt) trade etc.

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  • Brian Colless
    Feb 8, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Yes, I went to
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_(hieroglyph)
      (but I had to do a search to get through to it, as the bit in round
      brackets did not register, did not light up in blue)

      The word ga, 'throw-stick' is offered in a little box; interesting;
      It was already saying G before it was borrowed for the proto-alphabet?

      One surprise for me was on the Narmer Palette (which I have studied
      very closely in the past): the Horus Hawk is holding one; the King is
      wielding a 'donger' (club) to smash skulls.

      The alleged 'birthing wand' is a puzzle to me.

      Brian Colless
      Massey U, NZ


      On 8/02/2009, at 3:14 AM, David Hall wrote:

      >
      > I recall a lecture given by a medical professor about Ancient
      > Egyptian Medicine to a group of people interested in history. He
      > had a photo of a flat ivory object shaped like a boomerang that he
      > had identified as a "birthing wand." He also showed a three legged
      > stool he indicated may have been used by midwives during
      > childbirth. I went to him after the lecture and told him I thought
      > it was a throwstick. I had spent some time memorizing some of the
      > art at the Beni Hasan tombs in Middle Egypt from the early second
      > millenium.
      >
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throw_stick_(hieroglyph)
      >
      > The professor was able to show a slide of some petrie dish cultures
      > on agar showing that myrhh was an antiobiotic and inhibited the
      > growth of bacteria. He indicated the Egyptians may have known about
      > its anitbiotic properties and gave evidence for AE trade with
      > Eastern Africa and India. A check of articles about the use of
      > myrhh as an antibiotic in ancient Egypt in google.com revealed more
      > proponents of the theory myrhh was used as an antiobiotic and also
      > to embalm mummies in ancient Egypt.
      >
      > David Q. Hall
      > dqhall59@...
      >
      >
      >
      > --- On Sat, 2/7/09, Brian Colless <briancolless@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Brian Colless <briancolless@...>
      > Subject: [ANE-2] Boomerangs in ANE
      > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Saturday, February 7, 2009, 12:42 AM
      >
      > It is time I responded (favourably) to this.
      >
      > Whenever I encounter boomerang-deniers in connection with the origin
      > of the letter G (gaml 'throwstick' ; not camel, as taught in Hebew
      > school!) my gentle retort is, as I said in my earlier trumpet vs bugle
      > message (31 Jan 2009):
      >
      > "I remember seeing Tutankhamon' s missiles on show in the Cairo
      > Museum,
      > with examples of Australian boomerangs for comparison; the difference
      > was that his are made of ivory."
      >
      > I also have a big picture book of *Wonders of Tutankhamun* (Crown,
      > 1978). It turns out to be the same source that David has named:
      >
      > > A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:
      > >
      > > http://www.touregyp t.net/museum/ boomerangpage. htm
      > >
      >
      > Actually, there was one ivory boomerang in his tomb, and some wooden
      > ones.
      > That source says that throw sticks and boomerangs were found in the
      > Annex of the tomb.
      > What is the difference?
      > Not all Australian boomerangs are 'returning' missiles, though
      > 'boomerang' implies recoiling in English usage.
      >
      > When thinking about the gamlu (Krummholz, Bumerang, von Soden; bent
      > stick, throwing-stick, Concise D) my mind plays with g-m-l as
      > connoting completion and repayment, hence the returning aspect. Is
      > this a silly idea that needs to be cleaned out of my head?
      >
      > Do the bentness and curving notions come from the boomerang and are
      > then applied to the camel? And the sickle (maggalu)?
      >
      > I note that the throw-stick was used in all periods in ancient Egypt.
      > And its hieroglyph ( T 14) is a determinative for 'throw-stick' from
      > a root meaning 'throw') is also a club (Gardiner says) as det. of
      > foreign peoples.
      >
      > What goes round comes round. Have you seen the French movie where a
      > businessman is playing with his boomerangs en plein air? He launches
      > one, then answers his phone, and .......
      >
      > Brian Colless
      > Massey University, NZ
      >
      > On 2/02/2009, at 3:33 AM, David Hall wrote:
      >
      > > Throw sticks were used for hunting birds in ancient Egypt. The
      > > hunter stood atop a papyrus skiff and tried to knock down a duck or
      > > goose:
      > >
      > > http://i-cias. com/egypt/ photos/beni_ hassan01. jpg
      > >
      > > A throw stick was found in King Tut's tomb:
      > >
      > > http://www.touregyp t.net/museum/ boomerangpage. htm
      > >
      > > David Q. Hall
      > > dqhall59@yahoo. com
      > >
      > > --- On Sat, 1/31/09, Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@terra. es> wrote:
      > >
      > > From: Andrés Piquer Otero <erewan@terra. es>
      > > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] Wikipedia, the Boomerang, staff slings
      > > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups. com
      > > Date: Saturday, January 31, 2009, 1:25 PM
      > >
      > > Clark Whelton wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I'm not sure that throw sticks, such as boomerangs, were used as
      > > > weapons or for hunting in the ANE.
      > > >
      > > > Clark Whelton
      > > > New York
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > Off the head, I recall O. Keel's "The Iconography of the Ancient
      > Near
      > > East" including a number of ANE pictorial renderings with weapons
      > that
      > > the author (or the academic sources he cites) interpret as "throwing
      > > sticks", whatever that instrument is.
      > >
      > > Andrés Piquer Otero
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



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