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3019RE: [ANE-2] weavers

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  • Kevin P. Edgecomb
    Dec 6, 2006
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      Yigael Yadin in his Art of Warfare in Biblical Lands, 2:354-355, suggests
      the "shaft of his spear like a weaver's beam" in 1 Samuel 17.7 was rather to
      indicate that, like the "leash rod" of a loom, it possessed a cord wrapped
      around the shaft which created a short loop. The illustrations given are for
      a model of a primitve Greek loom, a drawing of a modern leash rod's loops,
      and a black figure kylix of a hoplite with precisely such a spear and his
      finger through the loop. The caption reads: "A typical Aegean javelin has a
      loop and cord wound round the shaft so that the weapon could be hurled a
      greater distance with greater stability by virtue of the resultant spin. The
      Greeks and Romans called such a javelin 'the loop.'"

      It's such a fine solution to the problem, that probably means it's wrong.

      Regards,
      Kevin P. Edgecomb
      Berkeley, California

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ANE-2@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of George F Somsel
      > Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 8:40 PM
      > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] weavers
      >
      > That would seem to solve a difficulty in reconciling the ABD
      > article stating that women did the weaving with the physical
      > realities that they would not be able to handle something so
      > heavy as what Goliath's spear was represented as being.
      >
      > george
      > gfsomsel
      > _________
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message ----
      > From: Lampros F. Kallenos <xalkinos@...>
      > To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2006 8:04:28 PM
      > Subject: Re: [ANE-2] weavers
      >
      >
      > > The shaft of his spear was like a weaver¢s beam ... ...
      > > The implication of this is that a weaver's beam was significantly
      > > larger and heavier than the normal spear shaft.
      > > Such a "weaver's beam" would be a significant implement for any
      > > average woman to handle.
      > >
      > > gfsomsel
      >
      >
      > The way to handle a spear is different from the way to handle
      > a weaver's beam.
      >
      > You handle a spear by putting your fingers around it, and
      > then you also have to lift and throw it. But a weaver's beam
      > is about 15-20 centimeters (six inches) long, and only has to
      > be thrown or pushed among the threads to the other side of
      > the weaving installation.
      >
      > So, I think what this phrase
      >
      > > The shaft of his spear was like a weaver¢s beam
      >
      > intends to is only a reference to the diameter of the shaft,
      > not to its weight. The weight is commented in the next phrase
      >
      > > his spear¢s head weighed six hundred shekels of iron
      >
      > And so, a woman could be a weaver.
      >
      >
      > .
      > _______________________
      > Lampros F. Kallenos "...EKANAN OISTRO THS ZWHS
      > Idalion, Lefkosia TO FOBO TOU QANATOU"
      > Kypros
      > --
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