Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

2995Re: SV: [ANE-2] weavers

Expand Messages
  • Peter T. Daniels
    Dec 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      NPL -- note that they're talking about H o r n e r (a modern American) and not H o m e r.

      Screen fonts are sometimes not all they need to be.
      --
      Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Niels Peter Lemche <npl@...>
      To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2006 11:17:11 AM
      Subject: SV: [ANE-2] weavers

      > But that is the point of Horner's book. The exact reference is Tom
      > Horner, Jonathan Loved David, Philadelphia (Westminster) , 1978, p. 38.

      > Linafelt's point at SBL was that Saul's sword in the lament (2 Samuel
      > 1:22), far from being the implement of a hero, was the tool in his
      > suicide, and that Jonathan's bow was key to his renouncing his claim
      to
      > the throne. With it he shot the arrows that warned David to flee
      execution > - 1 Samuel >20:35ff. See Ackerman's, When Heroes Love and
      especially
      > Nardelli's new >book when it comes out.
      > Andrew Fincke

      Maybe somebody here read too much Homer, and too little ANE stuff. I
      guess that some here will think of similar homosexual motives in
      Gilgamesh. Homosexuality is mentioned here and there in the OT but they
      simply don't like it. So what do we have: anything except a modern and
      very colored reading of biblical texts? I guess that the same attitude
      will turn most military history into a history of homosexuality, and we
      are in no need of another Keagan to tell us that history.

      Finally, and here we are again again again: on what background are we
      discussing: a narrative and a dubious interpretation of the narrative,
      or historical persons. Since we should only discuss the first thing
      here, it must be narrative. We cannot use this text to say that David
      was gay. WSE can discuss whether or not a novelist made him that. I
      think that this novelist mostly show him as a friend of nice girls (or
      rather women, as the narrative have him suing mostly married
      women--Abigail, Batsheba, and perhaps even Micha).

      Niels Peter Lemche

      PS: a piece Paper never objects to what is written on it.
    • Show all 30 messages in this topic