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2984Re: weavers

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  • Marc Cooper
    Dec 4, 2006
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      I would just add that while women seem to be the weavers in ED III
      and Sargonic Mesopotamia, female supervisors do appear in the
      tablets, though in Ur III and afterwards supervisors were always
      male to my knowledge.

      Marc Cooper
      Missouri State University

      --- In ANE-2@yahoogroups.com, Robert M Whiting <whiting@...> wrote:
      >
      > On Mon, 4 Dec 2006, victor avigdor hurowitz wrote:
      >
      > > you and Liz might be interested in S. Zawadaski, Garments of the
      > > Gods. Studies on the Textile Industry and the Pantheon of Sippar
      according
      > > to the Texts from the Ebabbar Archive, OBO 218, Fribourg,
      Goettingen 2006
      > > Victor
      > > BGU
      >
      > For Mesopotamia in the Ur III period, see also, in general, H.
      Waetzoldt,
      > Untersuchungung zur neusumerischen Textilindustrie (Rome 1972),
      and, in
      > specific, A. Uchitel, "Women at Work: Weavers of Lagash and
      Spinners of
      > San Luis Gonzaga" in S. Parpola and R. Whiting (eds.) Sex and
      Gender in
      > the Ancient Near East, CRRAI 47 (Helsinki, 2002), 621-31.
      >
      > George pretty much has it right. Women did most of the work of
      weaving
      > and men did the supervision.
      >
      > Bob Whiting
      > whiting@...
      >
      > >
      > > On Mon, 4 Dec 2006, George F Somsel wrote:
      > >
      > > > Large numbers of women of the lower social classes were
      employed in
      > > > temple and palace workshops. Some were free, many slaves. Here
      too
      > > > they worked in traditional feminine occupations, in the
      kitchen as
      > > > cooks, pastry makers, and menials; in the textile industry as
      spinners
      > > > and weavers. Usually all were under the supervision of men.
      Free women
      > > > might have brought their children with them. Women of the
      poorer
      > > > classes must have helped their husbands in whatever occupation
      they
      > > > were in, for there was no sequestering of women. Women might
      also have
      > > > worked in various agricultural jobs in palace and temple
      fields and
      > > > with animals.
      > > >
      > > > Freedman, D. N. (1996, c1992). The Anchor Bible Dictionary
      (6:949).
      > > > New York: Doubleday.
      > > >
      > > > This would seem to indicate that in the ANE women may have
      done the
      > > > work but the supervision was male. Perhaps this is so with
      regard to
      > > > weaving, but I recall a passage in the OT which might call
      this into
      > > > question (not simply on the basis of grammatical gender). In
      1 Sam
      > > > 17.7 it states regarding the accoutrements of Goliath
      > > >
      > > > The shaft of his spear was like a weaver¢s beam, and his spear¢
      s head
      > > > weighed six hundred shekels of iron; and his shield-bearer
      went before
      > > > him.
      > > >
      > > > The Holy Bible : New Revised Standard Version. 1989 (1 Sa
      17:7).
      > > > Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers.
      > > >
      > > > The implication of this is that a weaver's beam was
      significantly
      > > > larger and heavier than the normal spear shaft. Such
      a "weaver's
      > > > beam" would be a significant implement for any average woman
      to handle
      > > > (though I've known a few who would be up to the task). Of
      course, in
      > > > the account of the construction of the tabernacle, its work is
      > > > attributed to two men, Bezalel and Oholiab.
      > > >
      > > > george
      > > > gfsomsel
      >
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