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13635Re: [ANE-2] Elephantine

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  • Peter T. Daniels
    Oct 6, 2011
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      When did the "Ten Commandments" become normative? How do you know that the "Jews" of Jerusalem didn't do all the things you list as practiced by the Yeb folk (mutatis mutandis for Egyptian precedents, depending on who was in the ascendant at any particular time)?

      --
      Peter T. Daniels grammatim@...


      >________________________________
      >From: Robert Feather <a8oct@...>
      >To: ANE-2@yahoogroups.com
      >Sent: Thursday, October 6, 2011 6:16 AM
      >Subject: [ANE-2] Elephantine
      >
      >
      >

      >
      >Dear Elizabeth, and Aren,
      >
      ><...>

      >You can of course define Judaism as you wish, but central to its values is the Ten Commandments. The people at Yeb broke at least two of the basic laws. They worshipped more than one god, and allowed work on the Sabbath. In addition they charged interest, married out, used Akkadian terms, followed the Egyptian legal, fiscal and social precedents - some dating back to 1700 BCE, as well as numerous other anomalous markers.

      ><...>
      >

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