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Re: [ALPA_Forum] status of PA general plan and hsng element?

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  • Irvin Dawid
    Steve, Tony and I serve on the Rail Corridor Task Force which met last week - we had an update on the city s housing element - per Julie Caporgne (sp), the
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 23, 2011
      Steve,
      Tony and I serve on the Rail Corridor Task Force which met last week - we had an update on the city's housing element - per Julie Caporgne (sp), the city will submit the element despite being deficient in homes planned (should be 2800). I left early so perhaps Tony can fill us in.

      Jeff might provide an update on that group the city formed - TAG - techinical advisory group, that was intended to provide input.  I attended a few of the poorly attended meetings - which seemed to be canceled as often as they met.  Frankly, despite all the hoopla about the wicked ABAG and the 'huge' number of housing required that clearly would destroy the 'character' of our city, I don't think this issue really was a popular one - certainly not in comparison to 'anaerobic digestion' that drew 100 folks to council on Mon, or HSR...

      On Wed, Mar 23, 2011 at 3:32 PM, steveraneyc21 <cities21@...> wrote:
       

      Dear ALPA,

      I'm guest lecturing at UC Berkeley Public Policy school on Monday. One of my presentations looks at RHNA / Housing Element/ General Plan Update debates.

      If someone could provide an update/opinion on how they see the general plan and housing element update going, that would help inform my powerpoint slides. When I was last following this, it seemed to me that PA was many months behind other cities.

      - Steve




      --
      Respectfully,

      Irvin Dawid
      753 Alma St., #126, Palo Alto, CA  94301
      650-283-6534 (cell)

    • steveraneyc21
      OK, I made my UCB Goldman School presentation last night. I covered: * smart growth and regional planning geometry * driving-reducing housing preference as
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 29, 2011

        OK, I made my UCB Goldman School presentation last night. I covered:

        * smart growth and regional planning geometry 

        * driving-reducing housing preference as imposed on Stanford by Palo Alto for Stanford West Apartments

        * the RHNA battle with Palo Alto NIMBYs

         

        In one PPT slide I use a thought experiment. How would worldwide public policy differ if the earth was populated by 6.8B Vulcans rather than humans: 

         

        * Rational, well-informed voters

             Land-use conversant

             Fox News viewership: 0

        * Regions control major city land use decisions

        * In 1992, the Rio Climate Summit unified the world to protect the climate

        * By 2011, Vulcans already meet 2035 AB32 (50% of 1990 CO2)

        * US gas price: $8 per gallon (like Europe's ==> 33% less driving), ripples through policymaking 

        * $200/ton CO2 (not $30/ton)

        * Aggressive worldwide population reduction effort

        * US President is Goldman School's Robert Reich (author of Supercapitalism, hence Reich would reduce corporate political power, eliminating barriers to rational policies to protect the climate)

         

         

        Ward Connerly, infamous for his efforts against affirmative action and one of the state's most-loathed people, invented the virtuous RHNA policy when working for then-Governor Pete Wilson. He had the insight that local city planning generated regional negative externalities.

         

        Palo Alto anti-RHNA NIMBYs frame ABAG as "Alien Basterds Against Goodness"

         

        *************************

        I wonder if it is true that Palo Alto is not making a good faith effort towards a RHNA-compliant housing element? Is Palo Alto intentionally delaying? Is Palo Alto 24 months behind other cities? Has even one compliant scenario been presented for discussion?

         

        When I begged off Palo Alto's Housing Element Technical Advisory Group, I advised The City that Attorney General Brown had successfully sued Pleasanton for their housing cap, essentially taking over local city control of land use planning. And I thought it likely that Brown would become governor and achieve a more powerful position enforcing smart growth for SB375 climate protection. I wonder if Palo Alto's vocal vilification of RHNA and ABAG means that HCD will make Palo Alto a target? Given Palo Alto's stated pro-climate policy, it could be embarrassing to be singled out.   

        - Steve

        --- In ALPA_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Irvin Dawid <irvindawid@...> wrote:
        >
        > Steve,
        > Tony and I serve on the Rail Corridor Task Force which met last week - we
        > had an update on the city's housing element - per Julie Caporgne (sp), the
        > city will submit the element despite being deficient in homes planned
        > (should be 2800). I left early so perhaps Tony can fill us in.
        >
        > Jeff might provide an update on that group the city formed - TAG -
        > techinical advisory group, that was intended to provide input. I attended a
        > few of the poorly attended meetings - which seemed to be canceled as often
        > as they met. Frankly, despite all the hoopla about the wicked ABAG and the
        > 'huge' number of housing required that clearly would destroy the 'character'
        > of our city, I don't think this issue really was a popular one - certainly
        > not in comparison to 'anaerobic digestion' that drew 100 folks to council on
        > Mon, or HSR...
        >
        > On Wed, Mar 23, 2011 at 3:32 PM, steveraneyc21 cities21@...wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > Dear ALPA,
        > >
        > > I'm guest lecturing at UC Berkeley Public Policy school on Monday. One of
        > > my presentations looks at RHNA / Housing Element/ General Plan Update
        > > debates.
        > >
        > > If someone could provide an update/opinion on how they see the general plan
        > > and housing element update going, that would help inform my powerpoint
        > > slides. When I was last following this, it seemed to me that PA was many
        > > months behind other cities.
        > >
        > > - Steve
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Respectfully,
        >
        > Irvin Dawid
        > 753 Alma St., #126, Palo Alto, CA 94301
        > 650-283-6534 (cell)
        >

      • lee mei
        Wow, great idea, thought provoking! Lee ... From: steveraneyc21 To: ALPA_Forum@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2011 10:55 AM Subject: [ALPA_Forum] Re:
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 29, 2011
          Wow, great idea, thought provoking!
          Lee
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2011 10:55 AM
          Subject: [ALPA_Forum] Re: status of PA general plan and hsng element?

           

          OK, I made my UCB Goldman School presentation last night. I covered:

          * smart growth and regional planning geometry 

          * driving-reducing housing preference as imposed on Stanford by Palo Alto for Stanford West Apartments

          * the RHNA battle with Palo Alto NIMBYs

          In one PPT slide I use a thought experiment. How would worldwide public policy differ if the earth was populated by 6.8B Vulcans rather than humans: 

          * Rational, well-informed voters

               Land-use conversant

               Fox News viewership: 0

          * Regions control major city land use decisions

          * In 1992, the Rio Climate Summit unified the world to protect the climate

          * By 2011, Vulcans already meet 2035 AB32 (50% of 1990 CO2)

          * US gas price: $8 per gallon (like Europe's ==> 33% less driving), ripples through policymaking 

          * $200/ton CO2 (not $30/ton)

          * Aggressive worldwide population reduction effort

          * US President is Goldman School's Robert Reich (author of Supercapitalism, hence Reich would reduce corporate political power, eliminating barriers to rational policies to protect the climate)

          Ward Connerly, infamous for his efforts against affirmative action and one of the state's most-loathed people, invented the virtuous RHNA policy when working for then-Governor Pete Wilson. He had the insight that local city planning generated regional negative externalities.

          Palo Alto anti-RHNA NIMBYs frame ABAG as "Alien Basterds Against Goodness"

          *************************

          I wonder if it is true that Palo Alto is not making a good faith effort towards a RHNA-compliant housing element? Is Palo Alto intentionally delaying? Is Palo Alto 24 months behind other cities? Has even one compliant scenario been presented for discussion?

          When I begged off Palo Alto's Housing Element Technical Advisory Group, I advised The City that Attorney General Brown had successfully sued Pleasanton for their housing cap, essentially taking over local city control of land use planning. And I thought it likely that Brown would become governor and achieve a more powerful position enforcing smart growth for SB375 climate protection. I wonder if Palo Alto's vocal vilification of RHNA and ABAG means that HCD will make Palo Alto a target? Given Palo Alto's stated pro-climate policy, it could be embarrassing to be singled out.   

          - Steve

          --- In ALPA_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Irvin Dawid <irvindawid@...> wrote:
          >
          > Steve,
          > Tony and I serve on the Rail Corridor Task Force which met last week - we
          > had an update on the city's housing element - per Julie Caporgne (sp), the
          > city will submit the element despite being deficient in homes planned
          > (should be 2800). I left early so perhaps Tony can fill us in.
          >
          > Jeff might provide an update on that group the city formed - TAG -
          > techinical advisory group, that was intended to provide input. I attended a
          > few of the poorly attended meetings - which seemed to be canceled as often
          > as they met. Frankly, despite all the hoopla about the wicked ABAG and the
          > 'huge' number of housing required that clearly would destroy the 'character'
          > of our city, I don't think this issue really was a popular one - certainly
          > not in comparison to 'anaerobic digestion' that drew 100 folks to council on
          > Mon, or HSR...
          >
          > On Wed, Mar 23, 2011 at 3:32 PM, steveraneyc21 cities21@...wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > Dear ALPA,
          > >
          > > I'm guest lecturing at UC Berkeley Public Policy school on Monday. One of
          > > my presentations looks at RHNA / Housing Element/ General Plan Update
          > > debates.
          > >
          > > If someone could provide an update/opinion on how they see the general plan
          > > and housing element update going, that would help inform my powerpoint
          > > slides. When I was last following this, it seemed to me that PA was many
          > > months behind other cities.
          > >
          > > - Steve
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Respectfully,
          >
          > Irvin Dawid
          > 753 Alma St., #126, Palo Alto, CA 94301
          > 650-283-6534 (cell)
          >

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