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Bird Record Keeping

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  • boneman_ak
    I ve never known who officially keeps records of what birds are seen where, in regards to unusual sightings . In June of 1987 I took a picture of an
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 13, 2013
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      I've never known who officially keeps records of what birds are seen where, in regards to unusual sightings .
      In June of 1987 I took a picture of an unfamiliar bird out of my window on Kachemak Drive , Homer.
      George West identified it as a Western Tanager and wrote it up for some kind of ornithology journal . I probably have a copy of the article somewhere. I think it may have been a first time documenting of that bird in Homer.
      A couple weeks ago I took pictures of an Eastern Kingbird in Anchor Point area . But I had and have no idea how rare that might have been .
      So who does one contact to find out how unusual a given bird sighting might be and where is the ultimate set of records for such kept ?

      There must be others who wonder about that too .

      Lee Post
      Homer
    • Elias Elias
      Dear Sir In the past there were various folks who when out of their way to glean reports from various media and largely synthesized those data in a publication
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 13, 2013
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        Dear Sir

        In the past there were various folks who when out of their way to
        glean reports from various media and largely synthesized those data in
        a publication called Field Notes. At least in North America this was
        the case. But going forward eBird.org is moving toward being the
        centralized repository of bird sightings the world over. I highly
        encourage you to submit your detections to that webpage. Not only will
        you be able to access them at any point in the future but anybody else
        can as well.

        Flock on!

        Elias/Ηλίας
        Arcata CA/San Diego CA
        Walkie talkie primero=707-633-8833
        Last ditch alternate=559-433-7254


        On Sep 13, 2013, at 10:02, boneman_ak <boneman@...> wrote:

        > I've never known who officially keeps records of what birds are seen where, in regards to unusual sightings .
        > In June of 1987 I took a picture of an unfamiliar bird out of my window on Kachemak Drive , Homer.
        > George West identified it as a Western Tanager and wrote it up for some kind of ornithology journal . I probably have a copy of the article somewhere. I think it may have been a first time documenting of that bird in Homer.
        > A couple weeks ago I took pictures of an Eastern Kingbird in Anchor Point area . But I had and have no idea how rare that might have been .
        > So who does one contact to find out how unusual a given bird sighting might be and where is the ultimate set of records for such kept ?
        >
        > There must be others who wonder about that too .
        >
        > Lee Post
        > Homer
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Remember -- Be nice!Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • ipetefink
        Lee, I agree with Elias Elias (response to your post) that you should submit your reports of “unusual” Kenai Peninsula birds (with photos, of course) to
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 13, 2013
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          Lee, I agree with Elias Elias (response to your post) that you should submit your reports of “unusual” Kenai Peninsula birds (with photos, of course) to eBird, but I disagree with him that the journal North American Birds (decades ago it was called Field Notes) and its Alaska Region seasonal bird reports are a relic of the past. My reasoning is that all of the reports that make it into eBird in Alaska can not be taken at face value because so many of them are unsupported by photograph or even a written description (specimens or audio recording would also work). Alaska eBird is not yet the "ultimate set of records" that you asked about. eBird records with adequate supporting information are of great value, and of course the vast majority of eBird records are of common, every day birds that need little or no documentation (except when they are out of season, etc.).   

           

          I suggest that you also submit your rare bird reports to Aaron Lang of Homer (birdingak@...), who produces a Southcentral Alaska (Homer to Prince William Sound) report that goes to the Alaska editor of the journal North American Birds, published by the American Birding Association. Aaron produces quarterly reports that synthesize bird sightings (including eBird reports) on a quarterly basis. These reports are weighted towards the rarer species, and birds occurring out of normal habitat or season.  In my opinion, the sightings in his reports are vetted more carefully than eBird reports, which largely means they are more likely to be supported by photograph. His report goes to an Alaska editor, who includes material from all around the state in his Alaska regional report in North American Birds. You can get more information on the journal at the American Birding Association web site. I’m sure Aaron would be happy to put you on his report mailing list. His reports are fun to read, and are dripping with great photographs.

           

          Rich MacIntosh

          Kodiak     

           


          --- In AKBirding@yahoogroups.com, <boneman@...> wrote:

          I've never known who officially keeps records of what birds are seen where, in regards to unusual sightings .
          In June of 1987 I took a picture of an unfamiliar bird out of my window on Kachemak Drive , Homer.
          George West identified it as a Western Tanager and wrote it up for some kind of ornithology journal . I probably have a copy of the article somewhere. I think it may have been a first time documenting of that bird in Homer.
          A couple weeks ago I took pictures of an Eastern Kingbird in Anchor Point area . But I had and have no idea how rare that might have been .
          So who does one contact to find out how unusual a given bird sighting might be and where is the ultimate set of records for such kept ?

          There must be others who wonder about that too .

          Lee Post
          Homer
        • Elias Elias
          Thanks Rich for the reminder that Field Notes has changed their name. I knew it had. I simply wasn t remembering what it was. My rationale for stressing the
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 14, 2013
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            Thanks Rich for the reminder that Field Notes has changed their name. I knew it had. I simply wasn't remembering what it was. My rationale for stressing the importance of eBird.org as being the one-shop stop is the assumption that every NAB sub-regional editor is gleaning the rare bird feed for their area of interest. Every rare bird entered into eBird.org within keen eye borough (sorry I couldn't resist) can be emailed to not only Mr Lang but every person interested in bird sightings in the kenai. It is the democratization of birding information.

            eBird.org has the ability to institute borough-level (occasionally finer scale) filters (abundance and seasonal) if more that x number of whatever species is reported. I assume that one eastern kingbird in the kenai would exceed that threshold and prompt the reporter to provide details including a photo if acquired. 

            So for these reasons, I tend to the think eBird.org truly is the ultimate repository provided one has a Internet connection and has an interest in sharing detection data with a broader community and adding the data point to scientific record. 

            Flock on!

            Elias/Ηλίας
            Arcata CA/San Diego CA
            Walkie talkie primero=707-633-8833
            Last ditch alternate=559-433-7254


            On Sep 13, 2013, at 23:56, "ipetefink@..." <ipetefink@...> wrote:



            Lee, I agree with Elias Elias (response to your post) that you should submit your reports of “unusual” Kenai Peninsula birds (with photos, of course) to eBird, but I disagree with him that the journal North American Birds (decades ago it was called Field Notes) and its Alaska Region seasonal bird reports are a relic of the past. My reasoning is that all of the reports that make it into eBird in Alaska can not be taken at face value because so many of them are unsupported by photograph or even a written description (specimens or audio recording would also work). Alaska eBird is not yet the "ultimate set of records" that you asked about. eBird records with adequate supporting information are of great value, and of course the vast majority of eBird records are of common, every day birds that need little or no documentation (except when they are out of season, etc.).   

             

            I suggest that you also submit your rare bird reports to Aaron Lang of Homer (birdingak@...), who produces a Southcentral Alaska (Homer to Prince William Sound) report that goes to the Alaska editor of the journal North American Birds, published by the American Birding Association. Aaron produces quarterly reports that synthesize bird sightings (including eBird reports) on a quarterly basis. These reports are weighted towards the rarer species, and birds occurring out of normal habitat or season.  In my opinion, the sightings in his reports are vetted more carefully than eBird reports, which largely means they are more likely to be supported by photograph. His report goes to an Alaska editor, who includes material from all around the state in his Alaska regional report in North American Birds. You can get more information on the journal at the American Birding Association web site. I’m sure Aaron would be happy to put you on his report mailing list. His reports are fun to read, and are dripping with great photographs.

             

            Rich MacIntosh

            Kodiak     

             


            --- In AKBirding@yahoogroups.com, <boneman@...> wrote:

            I've never known who officially keeps records of what birds are seen where, in regards to unusual sightings .
            In June of 1987 I took a picture of an unfamiliar bird out of my window on Kachemak Drive , Homer.
            George West identified it as a Western Tanager and wrote it up for some kind of ornithology journal . I probably have a copy of the article somewhere. I think it may have been a first time documenting of that bird in Homer.
            A couple weeks ago I took pictures of an Eastern Kingbird in Anchor Point area . But I had and have no idea how rare that might have been .
            So who does one contact to find out how unusual a given bird sighting might be and where is the ultimate set of records for such kept ?

            There must be others who wonder about that too .

            Lee Post
            Homer


          • boneman_ak
            I understand there are online places to post every bird people are seeing but I was mostly curious about where and how one would find out what the record was
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 14, 2013
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              I understand there are online places to post every bird people are seeing but I was mostly curious about where and how one would find out what the record was of an unusual bird being seen in the past .

              Where and when has a particular unusual bird been seen and documented ever, not just what has been posted in the last 5 years or so .

              For instance these tanagers in Seward . Have they been documented in Seward previous to now ? How about in South Central Alaska ?
              Where and how many times .

              Who does one ask about this and how complete are the records they have access to .

              The article from 1987 says that species had been seen or documented 4 times as of that point in time but someone else hadn't uncovered those records . So where do those records from that journal go and is there a database for those and if so - how come it didn't show up in the records Todd had ?

              That's where my questions are leading me . Just Curious
              Lee Post
              Homer
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