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FW: Common Sandpiper & Green Sandpiper, Lake Louise Lodge (LATE REPORT)

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  • Peter Scully
    I am forwarding this late report I found on the Massachusetts Bird Listserv.  Common and Green Sandpipers reported from Lake Louise Lodge in beginning of
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 28, 2013
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      I am forwarding this late report I found on the Massachusetts Bird Listserv.  Common and Green Sandpipers reported from Lake Louise Lodge in beginning of June by a birding group from Mass.  Had not seen it reported here and thought it might be of interest to the group.
       
      Excerpt:
       
      "Once at the lodge located right on the lake, there standing in the grass along the beach was a Green Sandpiper [shocker], the next morning another vagrant a Common Sandpiper! As it turned out, these 2 vagrants topped what was seen on the island by a long shot."
       
      Full post here:  http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=468826&MLID=MASS&MLNM=Massachusetts
       
      I don't have any other details.
       
      -Peter

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    • Jim Stevenson
      Howdy Folks, I’m sorry I haven’t posted this yet but I had a long drive back from Prudhoe, after putting my clients on the plane in Barrow. First, it has
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 29, 2013
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        Howdy Folks,

        I’m sorry I haven’t posted this yet but I had a long drive back from Prudhoe, after putting my clients on the plane in Barrow.

        First, it has been years since I saw so many neat birds on this annual trek for me, which began in 1979. I have been doing it professionally since 1997.

        There were many more birds on top of the spruce trees than most years, with the majority of non-robins being waxwings and Pine Grosbeaks. There were also several Harlan’s Hawks over the spruces, plus several rough-legs and SE Owls over the tundra, north of mm 131. PIGR are quite common around Coldfoot, and WW Crossbills are in many places “Wayup North” right now. A pond with a pair of Horned Grebes was nice, but the Rusty Blackbirds around it were even better (not far south of Coldfoot).

        In Atigun Pass we missed rosy-finch for the third straight year, but found wheatear plentiful. Curiously few Snow Buntings and only one pipit.

        As was indicated, the Gyrfalcon nest is again active, just south of Ice Cut, and not far from a rough-leg nest. Smith’s Longspurs and Yellow Wagtails were easy, but for the third straight year, we failed to find Bluethroat.

        The costal tundra was really good this year, so from mm 60 on to Prudhoe we had to watch the marsh carefully.

        As usual, though, Deadhorse (Prudhoe) was far better than the ride up. One large pond about 4 o’clock off the large, circular road around the lake had many eiders of the two common species there (King and Specs). All four of us with cameras about melted our lenses down there, and other spots like behind the old Arctic Caribou Inn were excellent, too (mating RN Phalaropes). Number of swans and both geese seemed high and as the years roll by, almost all birds get tamer for the folks with cameras. One male Gadwall seemed awfully far north.

        We also had a nice flock of tame Sabine’s Gulls in smart plumage, and as always, feeding on the leeward side of the big lake (Colleen?). How curious it is to see another charadriform (besides Sandwich Terns) with a black bill and light tip, instead of vice versa (I have no working hypothesis for this).

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        We flew to Barrow for 36 hours and were again rewarded with lotsa birds. We had 9 Steller’s Eiders, a coupla Pomarine Jaegers, 3 Snowy Owls, more Sabine’s Gulls, loads more LT Ducks, two fly-by Yellow-billed Loons (on the way to the airport, along Stevenson Road), several pairs of Red-throated and Pacific Loons, one Common Eider out on the ice, a Varied Thrush .9 km down Cake Eater Road, which had loads of golden plovers, and many Red Phalaropes further down.

        We saw exactly ZERO scoters inside the Arctic, and almost none off Anchor Point a coupla weeks ago. Hypotheses?

        How lucky you are to live in a wilderness like Alaska. In the summer.

        Jim, in Homer



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