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Gambell: Willow Warbler #2, two Little Buntings, Chipping, Gray-tailed

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  • Paul Lehman
    A mix of weather and wind directions at Gambell the past couple days. On Sunday the 28th we found the week s SECOND WILLOW WARBLER, which is still present
    Message 1 of 223 , Aug 30, 2011
      A mix of weather and wind directions at Gambell the past couple days. On
      Sunday the 28th we found the week's SECOND WILLOW WARBLER, which is
      still present today (Tuesday), at times cavorting with the continuing
      LITTLE BUNTING, which today became TWO Little Buntings when we finally
      confirmed two different birds about 300 yards apart on the lower
      mountainside. Nice photos obtained by others of both one of the buntings
      and the warbler, and we'll try to post them in the near-future on some
      website such as surfbirds.com Also yesterday and today is a juvenile
      CHIPPING SPARROW, with a surprising 22 fall records here, given it
      breeds no closer than southeast and east-central Alaska. At one point
      one of the Little Buntings was chasing the Chippy all over the place:
      the Asian and North American counterparts of each other. More new
      sparrows today included 3 White-crowned, 1 Golden-crowned, and 3
      Savannahs--all rare-but-regular fall vagrants from the mainland. Today
      we had the first juvenile GRAY-TAILED TATTLER of the season (rare but
      regular). Actually, the rarest bird the past three days here was the RED
      KNOT on Sunday, only the fourth fall record here--though I admit that
      not many people would have it at the top of their list.... The earlier
      wayward PINE SISKIN became a flock of FOUR Pine Siskins. Other
      miscellanea included a flock of 6 Sanderlings (rare but annual, but the
      largest flock I've ever seen here), plus 15 more fly-by Sharp-tailed
      Sandpipers, and 8 more Ancient Murrelets.

      --Paul Lehman
    • Paul Lehman
      We are in the midst of what will likely turn out to be at least a week-long run of north winds and chilly temps--probably until at least next Mon or Tues.... 
      Message 223 of 223 , Sep 22 1:53 PM
        We are in the midst of what will likely turn out to be at least a
        week-long run of north winds and chilly temps--probably until at least
        next Mon or Tues....  But despite that, we did have a new LITTLE BUNTING
        yesterday (the 21st) in the far boneyard, the 5th Little Bunting here
        this fall. Also a BRAMBLING in the circular boneyard from 19-21 Sep, a
        species which is almost annual in fall here in very small numbers. The
        second RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH of the past week was at old town also from
        19-21 Sep. But the best mainland stray was the BLACKPOLL WARBLER present
        19 Sep only, establishing the third fall record here, and casual
        anywhere to offshore Alaska. The previously mentioned SIBERIAN ACCENTOR
        #2 ended up staying four days, and the EURASIAN SKYLARK remained at
        least six.  The first couple Ancient Murrelets of the season were seen
        yesterday, an uncommon but regular post-breeding disperser from the
        south, but it has been a slow year for that species to date.

        Over the years, there has been a strong correlation between the numbers
        of Red-throated Pipits here in fall and the numbers farther to the south
        a month later along the U.S. and Mexico west coast. This year has been
        rather mediocre for that species here, with a total of 18 individuals to
        date, and few additional birds expected. So, it will probably be a
        ho-hum to average year to the south as well.

        --Paul Lehman
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