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Two White-throated Sparrows and Cedar Waxwings in Homer

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  • Aaron Lang
    Dave Sonneborn, Joe and Kim McLaughlin, and I rang in the first of the year with a full day of birding in Homer. The weather was lousy--rainy and windy--but
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 1, 2011
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      Dave Sonneborn, Joe and Kim McLaughlin, and I rang in the first of the year
      with a full day of birding in Homer. The weather was lousy--rainy and
      windy--but the birding had a few nice highlights.

      We started at the feeder at the end of Steller's Jay Drive that has been
      hosting a White-throated Sparrow since the Christmas Count. Today it had not
      one, but two WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS accompanied by 5-6 WHITE-CROWNED, 2
      GOLDEN-CROWNED and 6 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS. One of the White-throated
      Sparrows is distinctly more brightly marked than the other. Yesterday we saw
      about 20 DARK-EYED JUNCOS in this neighborhood, but totally missed them
      today.

      On City View Drive, in town on the hillside, there was a flock of about 100
      AMERICAN ROBINS, 100 BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS and 2 CEDAR WAXWINGS feasting on
      mountain ash berries. Yesterday one of the Cedar Waxwings was on the corner
      of Lee and Calhoun, a bit further down the hill. I've been seeing up to 3
      Cedar Waxwings recently on Fernwood Drive, about 6 miles out East End Road.

      Because of wind and rain birding on the spit was challenging and we didn't
      see much of note. Dave saw the NORTHERN HARRIER on the spit yesterday but we
      couldn't find it or any of the other recent goodies on the spit today. A
      GRAY-CROWNED ROSY-FINCH of the interior race *tephrocotis *was the most
      interesting spit bird.

      Good birding,

      Aaron Lang
      Homer


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