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Gambell: Middendorff's may be an Acrocephalus warbler?

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  • Paul Lehman
    Oops. The adult Middendorff s Grasshopper-Warbler reported here on 9 September MIGHT instead be a bird of the genus Acrocephalus and be a first North
    Message 1 of 157 , Sep 10, 2010
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      Oops. The "adult Middendorff's Grasshopper-Warbler" reported here on
      9 September MIGHT instead be a bird of the genus Acrocephalus and be a
      first North American record (if we can figure out what species it is!!),
      with Eurasian Reed, Blyth's Reed, and Marsh Warblers the closest
      matches, with also Blunt-winged, Paddyfield, and Manchurian Reed also
      needing to be considered. We are trying to work it out, but would love
      to receive feedback from anyone who knows anything about this genus.
      Aaron Lang is posting additional photos on his
      website--www.birdingak.com--tonight, at least he is trying to do so but
      is currently experiencing "Gambell technical difficulties." He had
      already posted some 12 photos yesterday evening. Folks can right-click
      on these photos and download them for study and forwarding to others.
      The bird was NOT present today, 10 Sept, so we can't add any additional
      details or photos, although there are a good number of photos of the
      bird taken yesterday, both perched and in flight. So..... please take a
      look at Aaron's site, though it is uncertain when all the new photos
      will be up and running.

      --Paul Lehman
    • Paul Lehman
      After I departed Gambell on 01 October, Georgia birder Chris Feeney remained for one more week, departing on 08 October. Certainly the best Asian bird he saw
      Message 157 of 157 , Oct 13, 2014
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        After I departed Gambell on 01 October, Georgia birder Chris Feeney
        remained for one more week, departing on 08 October. Certainly the best
        Asian bird he saw during that time was a YELLOW-BROWED WARBLER in the
        far boneyard on 07 October. He obtained one photo, which I have posted a
        cropped version to Surfbirds.com (N. American Stop Press section). This
        is the second Yellow-browed at Gambell this fall and 6th overall (all in
        autumn), representing about half the North American records. The
        previously reported RUSTIC BUNTING remained a full week and was last
        seen on 06 Oct; and there was the 'final' BRAMBLING of the season on 07
        Oct. Other highlights of Chris's included an AMERICAN ROBIN (8th fall
        record) on 03 Oct, another YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, the latest-ever
        GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW, and a total of about 10 more MCKAY'S BUNTINGS,
        including a single group of 7 birds on 06 Oct associated with a migrant
        'hit' of Snow Buntings (typical at end of Sep or in early Oct). Pomarine
        Jaegers, Short-tailed Shearwaters (up to 200,000), and various late
        groupings of auklets continued to parade by the point, as did many
        hundreds but not thousands of Spectacled Eiders. A couple more
        Red-necked Grebes, a few lingering Pacific Golden-Plovers, and a white
        Gyrfalcon.

        --Paul Lehman
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