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Gambell: Middendorff's may be an Acrocephalus warbler?

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  • Paul Lehman
    Oops. The adult Middendorff s Grasshopper-Warbler reported here on 9 September MIGHT instead be a bird of the genus Acrocephalus and be a first North
    Message 1 of 209 , Sep 10, 2010
      Oops. The "adult Middendorff's Grasshopper-Warbler" reported here on
      9 September MIGHT instead be a bird of the genus Acrocephalus and be a
      first North American record (if we can figure out what species it is!!),
      with Eurasian Reed, Blyth's Reed, and Marsh Warblers the closest
      matches, with also Blunt-winged, Paddyfield, and Manchurian Reed also
      needing to be considered. We are trying to work it out, but would love
      to receive feedback from anyone who knows anything about this genus.
      Aaron Lang is posting additional photos on his
      website--www.birdingak.com--tonight, at least he is trying to do so but
      is currently experiencing "Gambell technical difficulties." He had
      already posted some 12 photos yesterday evening. Folks can right-click
      on these photos and download them for study and forwarding to others.
      The bird was NOT present today, 10 Sept, so we can't add any additional
      details or photos, although there are a good number of photos of the
      bird taken yesterday, both perched and in flight. So..... please take a
      look at Aaron's site, though it is uncertain when all the new photos
      will be up and running.

      --Paul Lehman
    • Paul Lehman
      Yesterday afternoon, the 13th, a first-cycle BLACK-TAILED GULL was at the point, but quickly disappeared and has not (yet) been re-found. This is the fourth
      Message 209 of 209 , Jun 14 5:28 PM
        Yesterday afternoon, the 13th, a first-cycle BLACK-TAILED GULL was at the point, but quickly disappeared and has not (yet) been re-found. This is the fourth Gambell record for this species, all in late spring. Also yesterday, a flock of 7 White-winged Scoters contained two adult males that appeared to be good candidates for Asian stejnegeri. Photos taken. This taxon is probably almost annual here in spring, and it is a possible candidate for a future split. This morning--June 14th--a TUNDRA BEAN-GOOSE made a nice low pass over town, heading south--the second individual seen here this spring. Yet another RED-NECKED STINT brings the season total to 8, a pair of rare KITTLITZ'S MURRELETS were off the point yesterday (possible breeder on the island's higher mountains), a scarce and late Red-necked Grebe is present, and the casual, long-staying first-cycle THAYER'S GULL continues today, as does the brachyrhynchus MEW GULL yesterday. Also continuing the past two days are the late pair of Eurasian Wigeon, at least one of the LESSER SAND-PLOVER pair, a few Black Guillemots, the territorial Northern Wheatear, and up to 8 Common (and a few Hoary) Redpolls--a semi-species not known to breed on the island. Two drake Common Goldeneyes today are rare but almost annual spring visitors and could conceivably be already post-breeding dispersers. A Northern Pintail nest is in the middle of the near boneyard, despite all the human and dog traffic.

        I depart for home tomorrow afternoon (15th), but am likely to be back in just over two months--in late August--for my annual long autumn stay (through early October).

        --Paul Lehman

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