Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Gambell: Dusky Warbler, Ringed and Sand- plovers, storm

Expand Messages
  • Paul Lehman
    Today, 1 September, a DUSKY WARBLER was first spotted by Aaron Lang et al. and then seen (or at least glimpsed) by all assembled in Gambell s far boneyard.
    Message 1 of 157 , Sep 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Today, 1 September, a DUSKY WARBLER was first spotted by Aaron Lang et
      al. and then seen (or at least glimpsed) by all assembled in Gambell's
      far boneyard. This is the EIGHTEENTH fall record of Dusky here since
      1997. The COMMON ROSEFINCH present also in the far boneyard has now been
      here five days, a record for the species. Also a push of Gray-cheeked
      Thrushes, more Bluethroats, and still 8+ White Wagtails. Shorebirds have
      definitely picked up the past several days, helped by a strong storm
      with south winds and rain that grounded a good number of shorebirds (but
      was basically a bust for landbirds) a couple days ago. Just before the
      storm there was a brief, calling COMMON RINGED PLOVER, my eighth here in
      fall, and the latest by about five days. (A Semipalmated Plover still
      here today is also my latest ever.) Yesterday we had our second juv.
      LESSER SAND-PLOVER of the season, and the storm dropped a fair number of
      SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPERS, with about 20 individuals here the past two
      days; a juv Sanderling (rare, but essentially annual); plus a major
      uptick in the numbers of Pectorals (80+), L-b Dowitchers, and Pacific
      Golden-Plovers. Just before the storm arrived there was a FORK-TAILED
      STORM-PETREL (casual visitor to the northern Bering Sea from the south)
      off the Point. During the storm we had another 7 Sabine's Gulls, Arctic
      Tern, and many hundreds of Red Phalaropes right along the shore.

      Every year at some time during the last few days of August or the first
      few days of September, when the wind shifts to the north after being out
      of some other direction for at least several days, there is always a
      substantial push of Emperor Geese. This year that day was today, and
      within just a couple hours of the wind shift, flocks of geese starting
      flying by, with some 400+ passing during this afternoon. Other
      miscellanea includes another Ancient Murrelet and another "Sooty" Fox
      Sparrow. And the numbers of Short-tailed Shearwaters are finally on the
      rise, with some 100,000+ off the Point this afternoon.

      --Paul Lehman
    • Paul Lehman
      After I departed Gambell on 01 October, Georgia birder Chris Feeney remained for one more week, departing on 08 October. Certainly the best Asian bird he saw
      Message 157 of 157 , Oct 13, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        After I departed Gambell on 01 October, Georgia birder Chris Feeney
        remained for one more week, departing on 08 October. Certainly the best
        Asian bird he saw during that time was a YELLOW-BROWED WARBLER in the
        far boneyard on 07 October. He obtained one photo, which I have posted a
        cropped version to Surfbirds.com (N. American Stop Press section). This
        is the second Yellow-browed at Gambell this fall and 6th overall (all in
        autumn), representing about half the North American records. The
        previously reported RUSTIC BUNTING remained a full week and was last
        seen on 06 Oct; and there was the 'final' BRAMBLING of the season on 07
        Oct. Other highlights of Chris's included an AMERICAN ROBIN (8th fall
        record) on 03 Oct, another YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, the latest-ever
        GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW, and a total of about 10 more MCKAY'S BUNTINGS,
        including a single group of 7 birds on 06 Oct associated with a migrant
        'hit' of Snow Buntings (typical at end of Sep or in early Oct). Pomarine
        Jaegers, Short-tailed Shearwaters (up to 200,000), and various late
        groupings of auklets continued to parade by the point, as did many
        hundreds but not thousands of Spectacled Eiders. A couple more
        Red-necked Grebes, a few lingering Pacific Golden-Plovers, and a white
        Gyrfalcon.

        --Paul Lehman
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.