Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Redpolls

Expand Messages
  • Delesta Fox
    This must be the year for the Redpolls...I have 10-15 currently feeding and drinking. Delesta Fox [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 30, 2006
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      This must be the year for the Redpolls...I have 10-15 currently feeding and drinking.
      Delesta Fox


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Steve W.
      Small flock about a week ago. Birch & Huffman area of Anchorage. Steve W.
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 4, 2007
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Small flock about a week ago. Birch & Huffman area of Anchorage.

        Steve W.
      • wkeys_99503
        I ve had a few sporadic Redpolls since Thanksgiving Day in Spenard. Also one juv. White Crowned Sparrow with 12-15 juncos, and a mystery warbler that hasn t
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 5, 2007
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          I've had a few sporadic Redpolls since Thanksgiving Day in Spenard.
          Also one juv. White Crowned Sparrow with 12-15 juncos, and a mystery
          warbler that hasn't shown up again.
          But yesterday, during the coldest windiest part of the day (around
          11 degrees here) the Chickadees were singing up a storm. It was loud
          full springtime singing. Not just a peep here and there--they were
          singing like a VECO executive on the witness stand.
          and that's the news from Spenard.

          w keys
        • wax4fun
          It s been interesting to read redpoll reports from further south as the birds leave their wintering grounds. We currently have the heaviest infestation of
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 14 10:16 AM
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            It's been interesting to read redpoll reports from further south as the birds leave their wintering grounds. We currently have the heaviest "infestation" of redpolls that I've seen at the feeder all winter, and this has been a year to remember for redpolls. Please don't send any more this way.
            Other spring arrivals in the Talkeetna area have been a pair of common mergansers at the Fish Lake outlet (mile 9, Talkeetna Spur Rd.); snow geese in the Numbered Lakes Park (off Barge Rd., Talkeetna), a robin in downtown Talkeetna, a pair of dark-eyed juncos and a singing brown creeper at mile 9.8 Talkeetna Spur Rd.
            Chris Mannix
            Talkeetna
          • w
            This afternoon, I chanced upon my biggest flock of redpolls this year on the BLM road to the Campbell Creek Science Center. It was 50 plus, which is not
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 10, 2011
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              This afternoon, I chanced upon my biggest flock of redpolls this year on the BLM road to the Campbell Creek Science Center. It was 50 plus, which is not going to set any records, but it was better than the handfuls that I've been seeing in the neighborhood.
              Next on the hit list are the Northern Shrikes. Has anybody seen any lately?

              w keys
              Spenard
            • Chris Maack
              Redpolls are now coming to my feeder in small flocks of about a dozen. After hearing them chittering overhead all summer, I was wondering when they would roll
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 10, 2011
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Redpolls are now coming to my feeder in small flocks of about a dozen.
                After hearing them chittering overhead all summer, I was wondering
                when they would roll in.

                The ravens seem to be very plentiful and aerobatic for this time of
                year also.

                Chris Maack
                Anchorage



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tim
                Has any one else noticed an unusually large number of redpolls this year?
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 2, 2013
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  Has any one else noticed an unusually large number of redpolls this year?
                • Tim Jones
                  Last week I asked Audubon members if anyone else had seen unusually large numbers of redpolls this year. There has been quite a response. In case anyone is
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 8, 2013
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Last week I asked Audubon members if anyone else had seen unusually large numbers of redpolls this year. There has been quite a response. In case anyone is interested, I posted a short blog item about it and also put most of the comments on it. Don't worry, no names or anything, just a general location. And thank everyone who responded. I don't feel so bad about hauling around those 40-pound bags of feed any more.

                    Cheers to all

                    Tim


                    Here is a link to the blog if anybody would like to see what others are experiencing: http://alaskaatitude.blogspot.com/2013/02/redpolls.html
                  • Pamela Eldridge
                    Tim,   Thanks for continuing the conversation about the Red Polls, as I find this very interesting, especially since the Red Polls are across such a large
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 8, 2013
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Tim,
                       
                      Thanks for continuing the conversation about the Red Polls, as I find this very interesting, especially since the Red Polls are across such a large territory - Anchorage to Talkeetna.
                       
                      The Red Polls did come back to our south Anchorage feeders. They were gone for two days, then the snow hit and they are back at the feeders. However, there's not the same numbers as before when they were a mob.
                       
                      Pam Eldridge
                      south Anchorage

                      From: Tim Jones <tjones@...>
                      To: akbirding@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Friday, February 8, 2013 12:43 PM
                      Subject: [AK Birding] Redpolls

                       
                      Last week I asked Audubon members if anyone else had seen unusually large numbers of redpolls this year. There has been quite a response. In case anyone is interested, I posted a short blog item about it and also put most of the comments on it. Don't worry, no names or anything, just a general location. And thank everyone who responded. I don't feel so bad about hauling around those 40-pound bags of feed any more.

                      Cheers to all

                      Tim

                      Here is a link to the blog if anybody would like to see what others are experiencing: http://alaskaatitude.blogspot.com/2013/02/redpolls.html


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • John Wenger
                      With all the Common Redpoll posts, especially regarding numbers, I thought of a Species Account piece on just how numerous they can be, especially juveniles.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 10, 2013
                      View Source
                      • 0 Attachment
                        With all the Common Redpoll posts, especially regarding numbers, I thought
                        of a Species Account piece on just how numerous they can be, especially
                        juveniles. As I watch the birds out my window, I will never forget this
                        event. Here it is cut and pasted:



                        Common Redpoll

                        (Carduelis flammae)

                        John Wenger

                        2011, 8/27 AK, Fairbanks. Creamer's field ~1/8 mile north of the barn.

                        While at the Fairbanks Crane Festival, I witnessed the largest
                        out-migration of passerines in my 39 years of birding in Alaska! At ~1130,
                        after returning from a walk led by Kent Skaggs, the festival guest speaker
                        from the Audubon Center at Rowe Sanctuary in Nebraska, I noticed flocks of
                        small birds moving in the nearby deciduous woods. Setting up my scope on
                        the trail, I could clearly see unusual amounts of Common Redpolls. Several
                        other birders stopped, wondering what I was looking at. Not seeming
                        impressed with dicky-birds, they soon left. However, a minute or two later,
                        Kent came up and also wondered what I was checking out. I told him to look
                        to the nearby woods and watch the passerines, as there was a constant
                        movement of them. Now, both impressed, we walked over for a closer look.
                        Walking ~25 feet into the woods on a trail with a boardwalk, we stopped as
                        the birds moved overhead past us. The heaviest movement was in a small (~50
                        foot wide) lowland marshy strip bordered by birch trees. I said "lets do a
                        min-survey" and we tried, counting one-by-one but the birds were simply to
                        numerous to count this way. So, setting my watch timer for a minute, I
                        started counting by tens. It was still impossible to do.just stopping to
                        check the watch for time, several hundred birds would be missed. We
                        adjusted our method counting by the hundreds and roughly estimated that ~500
                        Common Redpolls, mostly juveniles, came through in a minute! We continued
                        counting for ~10 minutes. Finally taking a breather, I looked up into a
                        birch tree section with my binocs and over a dozen redpolls were in view.
                        I then checked farther on the trail which was bordered only by mostly
                        conifers to see if the same amount of birds were passing there.they were
                        not. The main movement was only in our lowland, marshy strip within the
                        woods. Oddly, later I realized that this movement was to the north??? I
                        have heard this is somewhat common at times but I've had no explanation of
                        it. This movement of Common Redpolls was the highlight observation for me
                        while at the Crane Festival.





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • erik.hendrickson755
                        Similar to other reports, I ve seen significantly more redpolls at my feeders this year, compared to my 3 previous winters in Healy. Over the past 6 or so
                        Message 11 of 11 , Mar 27, 2013
                        View Source
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Similar to other reports, I've seen significantly more redpolls at my feeders this year, compared to my 3 previous winters in Healy. Over the past 6 or so weeks, I've seen perhaps 15 to 30 redpolls daily; most are COMMON REDPOLLS, and as many as 1/4 have been HOARY REDPOLLS.

                          They move around quickly and are surprisingly hard to observe. Dan Crowson gave me a tip: common redpolls are overall brownish and hoary redpolls are overall grayish - especially for the males. For females, I find that bill size and the amount of white on the rump are most useful. (Sibley shows 1st year females look very similar, but bill size again seems to be a useful field mark).

                          I placed some photos (mostly poor light and out of focus, but useful for comparison) in album "ErikH".

                          Erik Hendrickson
                          Healy, AK
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.